How much is your health worth?

Yesterday, I rode my bike on my usual path. It’s a 20-mile ride up and down Provo Canyon, turning away from Sundance, to the top of South Fork. The road dead ends there, in front of the Girl Scouts’ Trefoil Ranch.

On the way up, a bull moose in my path took my breath away. I’ve heard moose (Meese? Meesen?) bellowing at each other, but I’ve never seen one up there! I stopped and tried to take a photo, but then he snorted so I figured I’d better get a move on!

On the way down, just past Bridal Veil Falls, there was a bighorn sheep in my path! I have never seen one, outside of the zoo! I had to slam on my brakes to stop short of him. Then he ran down and kinda chased a terrified jogger off the path and into the trees. Then he ran back up into my path and trotted towards me. Scary, because I couldn’t have turned my bike around on the narrow path if I’d wanted to.

I got a picture, but it’s just his tail; you can’t even tell what kind of animal it is.

This made my day and I had a giant grin on my face all the way down. My life is ridiculously awesome because I’m blessed to be so physically active—even though I was fat and ill, 20 years ago. Sometimes when I’m skiing, biking, or just won a tennis tournament, I feel a little guilty. I think of all my peers who couldn’t make it up that 10-mile ascent if they were handed a $15,000 decked-out Trek road bike.

Tons of people my age are coming home from work and going into “energy conservation” mode, plopping into the La-Z Boy every night after work and doing as little as possible until bedtime. They don’t even LIKE television, but it’s all they have the energy for. Some of my peers are sidelined by diagnoses like ALS, migraines, obesity, diabetes.

Somebody said to me recently, “If you don’t have your health, you don’t have anything.” Your work, your hobbies, your relationships, everything is impacted negatively, eroded, as you lose your health. The cool thing is, you can regain it—incrementally, gradually, but you CAN regain it, but only if you’re willing to put in some effort.

I have gone to Zumba the last three nights in a row with Matthew. Last night, the teacher’s music was so LOUD that our ears were ringing and we both left before the end.

Today he sent me an article about how verbal persuasion is the LEAST effective way to motivate people. The MOST effective is personal experience. A study showed that nurses who had suffered a hospital-acquired infection were much more likely to tell others to wash their hands.

But, nurses in the study were just as motivated if a close friend or family member suffered an infection. So, vicarious experience can be just as powerful! This is exciting news—apparently, we DON’T have to learn everything “the hard way!”

Matthew wrote in the same email, “Why were you and I the ONLY people saving our ears and walking out? No one even asked the teacher to turn it down! It’s like people eating stuff that hurts them because everyone else is doing it.”

I like the fact that MY experience can help you avoid the same fate. Matthew also wrote, about the quote from the article that nurses were “turning their hand hygiene into a moral passion:”

“This is totally you, when you teach your class!”

When I teach, I tell my story, of 21 CHRONIC HEALTH CONDITIONS I had at the age of 26, that went bye-bye because of my excellent diet and simple but consistent lifestyle habits. When I teach, I tell about the desperate health crisis of my baby boy, once on constant antibiotics, steroids, and bronchodilators, who is now a 6’3″ drug-free, illness-free college-prep athlete. Learn vicariously from my story, rather than doing it the hard way!

It’s so worth the time I’ve spent educating myself and developing new habits. Drinking Rejuvelac every day, my new habit from Creative Health Institute, makes me happy! I don’t really love the stuff yet, but I don’t hate it, either. And I love the thought, “Wow, I just drank a big glass of enzymes and probiotics!” It’s SO easy to make, and now it’s the base of my green smoothies and no one has even noticed!

I am going to learn something new and awesomely cool everyplace I go in the coming year, and I’m going to teach it to you when I get home!

6 thoughts on “How much is your health worth?

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  1. I love your day and what you’ve been writing about. That was my favorite trail to run on and bike when I was in college. My family is currently making the transition from what we thought was a pretty healthy version of the SAD and it breaks my heart to see those around me grow old and lose their health way before their time (especially my parents and in-laws). We’re doing green smoothies almost every morning and I’m excited to try the Rejuvelac. I would really like to do a week long cleanse. The one from CHI sounds interesting, but I was wondering if that is something you would reccomend from home and if so is there any more info/recipes/instructions you can give us. If not, are there any other cleanses you might suggest? Thank you for all you do.

  2. Thank you for all you do. Today at Sam’s Club, I saw a friend/co-worker from 23 years ago. Her husband was driving one of those handicap carts and she looked sooo old. She is my age, her child is the same age as my children. I have only been doing green smoothies for about 18 months, but I feel much younger than my years! My daughter (33 yrs.) has more aches and pains than I (56 yrs.) do. Thank you for teaching us (GSG readers) everything you learn.

  3. I read a quote many years ago that has stuck with me regarding health: A person with their health has hundreds of dreams; a person without their health has one.

    That says it all…

  4. Because Rejuvelac is fermented, does the resulting liquid contain alcohol? I was excited to learn that kefer grains could make kefer with fruit juice until I read that there is some alcohol in the resulting kefer.

  5. Andi, I thought a lot at CHI about whether someone could do the whole thing at home. You certainly COULD, but it would be a lot of work. Unless you get away, you’re not likely to do it so singlemindedly, like we did there. I told Kristin when I got back, “It was weird to be all about ME for five days! As a mom, that NEVER happens.” (And of course, I was interviewing, filming, photographing—so it wasn’t ALL about me detoxing. But I was BUSY from early in the morning until 10 p.m. every day.)

    And you’d have to invest in some stuff: a rebounder, the kitchen equipment, the wheatgrass juice press (and you’d have to grow it or buy it, by the flat), and doing the enemas is possible at home but some people are scared of it….I could go on.

    If you want to do a colon cleanse, read my report under Articles on the site.

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