Birthday season is over, but the CAKE was divine

Aug. 22 ended birthday season around here, when Emma turned 17.

ABC’s Wife Swap, filmed in 2007, when you agree to do the show, waltzes in and figures out what they can string you up for. (I knew they would. I considered it a game.) For me, it was the green smoothies, and the fact that I tell my kids, “The bus leaves at 7:22,” and then I leave them to walk to school, if they’re not ready.

None of that bothered me. What I didn’t see coming was that they would make a federal case about the two times I rented out a skating rink, or the municipal pool, for back-to-back parties for my kids. Each had their own party, their own cake, their own friends and presents. It wasn’t cheap to rent out the pool, and my kids decided that was what they wanted.

We did it just twice, the last time 6 years ago. The kids had a ball at their party.

Wife Swap made out that I am “obsessed with efficiency” and “won’t let them have their own party.” They purposefully failed to mention that all four of my kids are born within 3 weeks of each other. They made it seem as if my four children born at different times of the year are forced against their will to have a joint party because I don’t care about them.

I recently brought Patty out from Creative Health Institute. She works for us fulltime now, and we love her!  She became a long-term volunteer there for 18 months. I will tell you Patty’s story later, on a video, with her making Choca-Maca-Laca that I learned at CHI last year from Madeline Wilson.

The recipe is named that for the superfood ingredients Maca and Lacuma. But I LOVE this yummy recipe, and Patty lost tons of weight eating the Ann Wigmore diet plus two whole quarts, daily, of Choca-Maca-Laca! Wow. I guess “a calorie is not a calorie is not a calorie,” because that’s a lot of calories. Remember Colin Campbell discovered in the Oxford-Cornell China Project that those eating a plant-based diet stay lean eating 200 calories a day MORE than animal-flesh eaters, who were not lean, ate!)

I also posted Patty’s raw peach cobbler on the blog a year ago.

Patty is a Level III raw chef, and she made this delicious cheesecake, with the ingredients in my kitchen, for Emma’s 17th birthday on the 22nd. All the kids loved it. She blends tangerines and peaches from my tree, into Rejuvelac, and tells the kids it’s Powerade. Even though she’s not a mother, she has the instincts: she tells them it gives them energy for school and sports. (It’s true, of Rejuvelac.) She puts a half gallon of it in the fridge, like at CHI, with a masking-tape label saying “Don’t drink this after 6 pm!” That’s because it’ll keep you awake.

The photo is of Patty with Cade (19), Emma (17), Libby (15) and Tennyson (12).

Sunday I’ll post the recipe!

Announcing three winners: GreenSmoothieGirl Makeover [part 1 of 4]

As I mentioned, I got LOTS of video applications. If you wanted to be in our pilot project, and you weren’t selected, please know that if the show takes off and we do more, I will want to work with you then!

One major factor was to choose folks who are VERY NEW to eating right. I was looking for people eating the Standard American Diet who desperately need some training, so we could watch their transformation from ground zero.

For the next three days, I’m announcing the 3 winners, and telling you why I fell in love with them and want to work with them first. I’ll be posting their demo videos.

We’ll create the reality show out of interviews and my consultations with these amazing families. You may not be aware that my family and I were on ABC/Disney’s show Wife Swap several years ago. (The green-smoothie, anti-junk-food lifestyle was, of course, central to the show. They matched us with a family who ate nothing but junk, in Albuquerque.)

Much of the show was manufactured, and I had an interesting experience working with cameras, producers, and directors in a high-pressure situation, a constant presence in my life. To a certain extent, creative license is required in making a show. But my show will be as real as possible because my point isn’t to create entertainment. It’s to give you a peek inside a real-life transformation, so you have inspiration for your own journey.

Will we ever do a “second take?” I’m sure that’ll occasionally be necessary. However, we aren’t going to put words in a family member’s mouth. We aren’t going to manufacture successes. We aren’t going to sugar-coat challenges.

You will be moved and inspired by their real stories–there is a lot of suffering here, but a lot of potential and enthusiasm, too.

Come with us on this exciting journey–make sure you’re subscribed to GreenSmoothieGirl channel on YouTube, so you know when we release each new segment!

The next three days, I’ll introduce you to our three families. We’ll post their demo footage, so you can see what I saw, before I summoned them to meet with BlendTec and me as finalists.

How GreenSmoothieGirl.com was born–it’s a crazy story!

Welcome to GreenSmoothieGirl.com!

I put this site up in August, 2007 when I went on a reality show and ABC/Disney told me I’d better prepare for an onslaught of publicity and requests for information.

My family eats a rather unusual diet that has led to exceptionally good health.  People notice because we buck American trends, and it shows.

I frequently have people who know about our diet show up on my porch, call on my phone, and stop me in public.  People are sick, they are overweight, they lack the energy to get through the day . . . and they want help.  They have lots of questions.  My experience as a nutrition educator has led me to this conclusion: People want to eat right. They just don’t know how.

The reality television experience was just the impetus I needed to make information about my family’s lifestyle more accessible to more people.

Little did I know what GreenSmoothieGirl.com would become!

A year and a half later, I have a small group of people working on the site, have written two books, and we are getting 80,000+ visitors monthly.  I take my responsibility to teach people how and why to eat whole foods very seriously and am willing to do whatever it takes.

This newsletter is my first-line effort to educate a terrifyingly underinformed public about basic principles of good nutrition, as well as, very specifically, how to live a healthy lifestyle.

I’ve had a wide and varied career. But besides being a mom, I’ve never done anything I feel is as important as my role teaching, helping, and nurturing people towards good health.

Today, a woman stopped me at the grocery store.  She said, “I have been seeking answers to my health problems.  I saw your car and the web site burned into my mind.  I’ve spent three hours reading your site, so far, and trying some things you suggest, and I’m amazed how when I eat right, I don’t crave bad stuff!”

That’s the beautiful thing about whole foods.  They are what God put on the planet to nourish us.  When we eat them, we don’t need anything else.  We get off the roller coaster of craving bad food and succumbing to the temptation and then hating ourselves for our indulgences.  GreenSmoothieGirl.com is the summation of my 15 years of studying exactly how to implement good nutrition in a real American family’s diet.

When we eat whole foods instead of the Standard American Diet, we have the boundless energy to not just dream big, but also fulfill those dreams.

In future newsletters, I’m going to tell you a little more about my story and introduce you to some fun parts of my site.

Thanks for joining me—I’m thrilled to have you along.

To Your Health,

–Robyn Openshaw

 

Kincade writes an essay (or two)

We had 15 minutes of fame on ABC’s show Wife Swap, where the show was quite fascinated with our discipline technique of assigning our children five-paragraph essays (with intro and conclusion) for breaking major family rules.   In Albuquerque, in the Espinosa-Marquez home, several of the “tribe” of skaters wrote essays I assigned about why using the “F” word is inappropriate.

We actually don’t do this very often.   But, we do find that our kids all ace English and don’t experience writer’s block at all, thanks to their copious home writing experience.   I keep their essays to entertain them in the future when they are adults (or to entertain all of us if they continue to not learn the lesson, by reading us all their original essay out loud).

My 14-year old son, Kincade, had a bad day on Sunday and wrote not one, but TWO, essays.   Because I thought one of them was hilarious, I share it here for your enjoyment.   Note the skilled use of lots of “filler,” which will come in handy for high school length requirements:

Are Fathers Important, and Do They Deserve Our Respect?

 Fathers are very important in a family, and so we should be respectful to them.   In my second essay of the day, I will discuss why fathers are so important to families.

In our family and in most families in our country, and the United States, and the world, and probably the universe, the fathers bring home the bacon; or, in our family, it’s more like the lettuce.   Fathers all around the world work very hard to provide the “lettuce” for the family and they work too hard for their snot-nosed kids to be disrespectful to them.   I think this is pretty much the reason why fathers are so important, but because I need to fill up this page, I guess I’ll need to make some more stuff up.

Fathers are also important because as a clinical study shows, families with fathers who take an active role are less likely to have children who become juvenile delinquents.   I think that 86% of these “clinical studies” are just made up, but fathers are important because if we didn’t have fathers, we would probably drive our mothers crazy.

Fathers are also incredible role models.   They set examples for their children like being responsible, working hard, and being a stud.   These are some of the examples that my father has showed me, even though I have picked up only on the last one.   If a father were a gang member, then the child would probably show some type of interest in joining a gang.   Fathers’ examples are the most important because every child looks up to his father.   This is why I think fathers’ examples are important.

Now I have told you why I think that fathers are so important.   I feel bad about being disrepectful to Dad last night, and I know that I should try harder to be more respectful.

By Kincade Pay