“Dear GreenSmoothieGirl” for Arizona, part 1 of 4

One of my favorite things about traveling to a new city on my speaking tour is meeting names I’ve been seeing since GSG was a brand new site. And meeting volunteers who come help us at the classes. Jenny and Tosh Black. Tawnya and Chad Hood. Jeannie Kirkpatrick. Shanna Anderson. Thank you all for coming, and for half a dozen of you who brought 15+ friends to Mesa….you “get” my vision of spreading this message far and wide, so that we turn the tide of the health disaster currently ruling in America. And I love you.

I’m going to answer questions submitted to us via email, the next few days:

Dayna: Do you use fluoride toothpaste or commercial sunscreens?

GSG: No fluoride toothpaste. It’s a toxic petroleum byproduct that should have never been in our water supply, let alone in toothpaste or supplements. In the store, we have a few cases of this awesome deal that I got that we provided through the group buy. I put a case in my food storage. Especially for little kids who swallow their toothpaste, please use a natural kind.

Sunscreen can be chemical or physical. I don’t use the chemical kind. I’d rather get a sunburn! It’s full of toxic chemicals. The physical kind uses nano zinc oxide that literally blocks the sun. When you rub it in, at first it makes your skin very white (or you can get the tinted kind here). A few minutes later, your skin will look normal though. We have a little in our store but are not getting any more.

Cheryl: do you know any healthy whole-food bars?

GSG: On my blog, I posted this one from Michelle Jorgenson. There’s also a Manna Bar in Ch. 7 of 12 Steps to Whole Foods. At Costco, the Trio Bar is pretty good, and most Lara Bars at your health-food store are good. (But she’s started putting some sugar in a few of her bars, so read labels—the Cherry Pie one is my favorite, with all-raw ingredients).

Please don’t buy “protein” bars made from soy (refined, adding to the excess bad-estrogen problem in our food suppy), or whey (highly refined animal product).

Read what Dr. Michelle Jorgenson has to say here.

Amy: I want alkaline water—but it has to be simple, affordable, and convenient.

GSG: I agree. I am not a fan of putting baking soda or sodium chlorite drops in your water, though. I tried that years ago and noticed no health benefits, plus it dirties your water and those additives make me uncomfortable. We have a group buy going on all the time now, with so many people interested, so we can get wholesale prices on ionizers. Having it installed under your own sink is the only way to do it, because alkaline water you get from your friends’ machine or at the health food store loses its alkaline pH within 8 hours, according to my testing.

Look under Robyn Recommends on GreenSmoothieGirl.com. This is an FAQ about the ionizer we arrange wholesale pricing for you:

Water Ionizer

More tomorrow…..

Nick’s comments about his ionizer

Received today via email:

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl:

About 3 years ago I participated in the water ionizer group buy.   Some of the benefits I enjoyed soon after I received it were:   noticably more energy within the first week; the end and I mean the end of restless leg syndrome that I had been experiencing since the late 1970’s.   This was an unexpected benefit that occurred within 3-4 weeks.   The RLS came back when I was away from my ionizer for three weeks but was quickly overcome when I got back to my machine (3-4 days).   Getting rid of RLS is a benefit that is not publicized and it might work for others and it did for me.

Best to you and all who participate in this year’s opportunity.

Nick

extra ingredients for green smoothies [part 3 of 7]

 

 

On to more green smoothie ingredients!

Lemon peel

Lemon peel is another ingredient I add almost daily.   I often buy a large bag of lemons at Costco, or I bring them home from California or Arizona when I visit there.   I freeze the lemon juice in ice cube trays for use in guacamole, raw desserts, and homemade salad dressings.   (Many recipes are found in Ch. 3 and 11 of 12 Steps to Whole Foods on GreenSmoothieGirl.com.)   But I don’t throw the lemon peels away!   I cut them in eighths (having washed the lemons well, first) and freeze them.   Every day I get a piece of lemon peel out of the freezer and toss it in my smoothie.   It’s a bit bitter, so it’s best when stevia or raw, organic is added to the mix to offset the bitter.

With its potent flavanoids, lemon peel has been linked by research to preventing and killing skin cancers.   As a teenager and young adult, I laid out in the sun for hours, nearly daily, from April to October.   I was always brown, but only after burning many times.   I’m more careful now, but still love the sun and never use sunscreen.   The only reason I can explain why I look younger than I am and have no skin cancer, despite being a fair-skinned redhead, is my excellent nutrition and near-daily use of lemon peel!

Sprouts

Sprouts are such an easy thing to grow, and most people don’t eat them at all.   They are living things, and they are enzyme packed little powerhouses.   When the seed, nut, or legume sprouts, all the enzyme potential is unlocked to go into that burst of energy that becomes a plant.   You have the opportunity, at that unparalleled nutritional level, to steal that nutrition for yourself.   Sprouts have the capacity to dramatically reduce your reliance on the body’s need to manufacture enzymes and consequently steal from metabolic processes.   When you eat them, you are oxygenating your body–think of eating sprouts as the very opposite of eating sugar and other toxic foods that make your body a host for all kinds of immediate and future problems.

They’re great on sandwiches, and I add them to granola I serve my children every morning.   But many people have a hard time finding ways to sneak them into the diet, and blending them into a smoothie is easy and painless.   Just add them as part of the greens portion of the recipe.  

I would not use sprouted nuts or large seeds like pumpkin and sunflower in green smoothies (unless you’re using “greened” sunflower sprouts–when the seed is grown into greens).   I would stick to the smaller seeds like clover, alfalfa, and fenugreek for green smoothie ingredients.

Eating right, even at Disneyland

Hi, Ben here—GreenSmoothieGirl.com’s webmaster. Robyn’s on spring break in SoCal, seeing Wicked and doing the theme parks with her family. But she left me her list of what she packed, to give you some travel ideas. She keeps her family’s energy high and digestion strong on vacation, while saving money on restaurants, by packing this stuff for breakfasts, lunches, and snacks.

Cooler:

Bags of baby carrots, sliced cucumbers, raw sweet potatoes

½ gal. homemade yogurt

2 bags Costco spinach

1 bag Costco frozen mixed berries

pint of soaked/drained sunflower seeds (to add to granola for breakfast)

quart of alfalfa/radish/clover sprouts (to add to granola for breakfast)

Box:

BlendTec

Plastic cups, straws, bowls, spoons, and baggies

Knife and cutting board for smoothies (I use it even on hotel room tables or vanities)

Lexan mugs for smoothies

Backpack for taking food to the parks

3 loaves whole-wheat bread

organic peanut butter-honey mix

gallon bag of homemade granola

3 boxes Rice Dream

gallon bag of soaked/dehydrated teriyaki almonds

Tonya’s “For Cryin’ Out Loud Dehydrator Onion Bread” (post to follow)

bananas (for green smoothies and to add to yogurt for breakfast)

bags of washed apples, pears, plums

 

5-gallon jug of filtered water