Send me your best HEALTHY TREAT recipe!

shutterstock_187878188 (Small)I am updating the 12 Steps to Whole Foods manual for our 5th Edition, and I’d love some of your very best HEALTHY TREAT recipes. If it’s made from whole plant foods, no processed or animal products, and you’re willing to share and have it published, send it with your NAME and HOMETOWN, and we’ll print it in this next edition! Send to support123@greensmoothiegirl.com, and THANK YOU!

I love helping people figure out how to get away from corn syrup and chemicals and toxic fats in their “junk food” of choice, and how to find something delicious that also nourishes their every cell. I’ve got lots of great recipes in 12 Steps, but I bet you can help me make that 400-page, full-color manual even better!

healthy treatsYour sending the recipe is your permission to share it—and please don’t send anything that is copyrighted by someone else. Please check your measurements and instructions very carefully, as we won’t have time to kitchen-test these before this new edition goes to print.

I love to share what’s working for you, with my readers. I’ll share some of your recipes on my blog, too!

Pudding candy?

puddingcandy
“Pudding Candy”

Our reader Britni wrote us:

This picture was affectionately named “pudding candy” by my 5 & 3yr old children. I just saw your blog post about the bowl of candy.I used to love all of the candies in that bowl, and peanut butter cups as well. Here’s what I do now, instead, since I’ve learned to love whole foods!

The mixture below is a spoonful of natural peanut butter next to a spoonful of “pudding”. The pudding is made from

Avocados, organic raw agave, organic raw cacao, organic cold pressed coconut oil, and vanilla. Then I added a scoop of vanilla GSG protein and a scoop of GSG Chocolate Green Light.

It’s a delicious treat that satisfies my kids’ sweet tooth.

Yum!

Can Easter be Sugar-Free?

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Sugar Free Easter Baskets for my Kids

hug me don't eat meAs it turns out, you CAN do Easter without sugar.

I love to make my kids baskets of gifts on Valentine’s Day and Easter. There are plastic eggs in these baskets, which I filled with treats, but no candy with refined sugar or corn syrup. I get them in bulk at the health food store: carob raisins and nuts etc.

I fill baskets with lip gloss, socks and underwear, movies, toys, mugs and other festive little gifts. My kids don’t expect sugar in their baskets.

I once did what everyone else did, before I knew better–but kids can and do survive the shift to a healthier life.

I love you, Cade, Emma, Libby and Tenn! Enough to get creative with the holidays.

Happy Easter to you. He is Risen!

 

My fantasy Halloween

 

Matthew sent me this cartoon last week.

I wrote back: “I wish!”

If you’re a new reader, you might not know that I’ve tried lots of things to
deal with this holiday. I love the costumes and macabre fun, and hate the
candy.

What has worked best for my family is that my kids go trick-or-treating, and
when they come home, I pay them $20 for the privilege of throwing their
candy away. My kids have never balked at this—they like money more than
candy.

If you have very small children or don’t have kids yet, remember, it’s not
wrecking their childhood if you opt out of the candy-collecting part of the
holiday, unless you decide to take them door to door asking for junk food.

I was raised doing it. And then I’d be sick for weeks after Halloween. I
don’t know what’s good about that rotten tradition.

Some friends of mine take their kids out to dinner on Halloween every year,
opting out completely and making their own memories in a different way.

 

Chia Pudding: a great new habit

Marlene told me, after my class in Kennewick, Washington, that she makes chia pudding for her diabetic husband as a meal or dessert. (Cinnamon is a great blood-sugar controller–note that she adds lots of cinnamon to his pudding.) It’s a great idea, since chia is a power food, and high in protein as well. (It’s pure fallacy that you can’t get enough protein eating a plant-based diet! You don’t have to go out of your way to find protein—greens, nuts, seeds, grains, and legumes average about 10%, which is perfect. But chia is particularly high, at 23%.)

I asked for the recipe, and here it is. Thank you, Marlene!

MARLENE’S CHIA SEED PUDDING

Stir together

1 TBSP chia seed  

about 1/4 to 1/3 cup of any milk alternative or water (hubby uses unsweetened chocolate almond milk, I use regular or coconut milk)

As much cinnamon as you enjoy (Hubby is diabetic so he gets about 1 tsp, I use less)

Let those two soak while you are busy for about 20 minutes.

Add any seed that you like:

1/2 TBSP sesame seed

!/2 TBSP sunflower seed  

1/2 TBSP pumpkin seed

Stir above together and add more liquid if needed

1 TBS nuts

1/2 TBSP unsweetened flaked coconut  

Sprinkle of hemp seed powder

Stir all together and then add whatever fruit you enjoy. We enjoy it with no added sweetener, just frozen berries in the winter or fresh fruit in the summer. I usually do not add the fruit till he is ready to eat, it can sit in the fridge for a couple of days if he gets too busy.  When I add the fruit, I mix in a little more liquid.  

This gives hubby a nice breakfast or dessert and does not raise his blood sugar as other breakfasts and desserts do.  He likes the energy he gets from eating it. It is usually a daily meal for him. Quantities can be increased for a family (our kids are gone and raised).

Halloween Controversy: better to feed candy to the homeless? or nothing?

Last year on Halloween, I posted that I pay my kids $20 for the privilege of dumping their Halloween candy in the trash outside. On facebook, I have the interesting situation of 90% of my personal page’s friends being GSG readers, and 10% being people I actually know. One of my high-school friends, cheerleader Beth, who has no idea who I am 25 years later, protested:   “Awww, don’t throw the candy away, give it to the homeless!”

A few of my more vociferous readers pounced on her. She had no idea what she’d gotten herself into, poor girl. She wasn’t on the GSG page with 13,000 people who know exactly what we’re all doing there.

She was on the Robyn Openshaw page—for all she knew, I was that girl she left the high-school campus with, at lunch, to get 7-11 Nachos and a Diet Coke.

When I was at CHI spending 16+ hours per day with the same 15 people, only one heated argument broke out. It was on this topic: “Is it wasting food, to throw away candy?” A mother, Esther, and her two adult daughters, Kendra and Melinda, had apparently been “going the rounds” on this subject.

I inadvertently stepped on that land mine when I said, “I don’t want to poison my own kids–why would I want to poison homeless people?” KABLAM, the room instantly divided into two camps.

You know without even thinking what the response will be: “But homeless people don’t get enough to eat! It’s not like homeless kids are eating salad anyway, or have any options! Who cares what their nutrition is—they’re just trying to survive.”

I opt out of those conversations at that point, because they’re a little contentious. But if you ASKED me, I’d say that generally in America, the homeless are not in jeopardy of having a choice between going hungry versus eating candy.

Actually, I could go on all day with my more indirect arguments to that line of reasoning. (If I thought anybody cared.) Okay, just a little academic argument here, acknowledging right up front that I know the homeless aren’t academic—they’re real people, trying to survive. I get it.

But for instance, did you know that the #1 factor related to longevity is LOW-CALORIE DIET? Yep, when people are calorie-suppressed for many, many years, they live a long time! Really thin people have minimal disease risk. Whenever I say this, I just about get strung up from the nearest tree. Check out my report on what the weight charts should REALLY be–this is John McDougall’s stuff, okay? Not mine. But it’s interesting and (sorry!) really valid:

http://www.greensmoothiegirl.com/nutrition-manifesto/healthy-height-and-weight-chart/

I realize it’s not politically correct to advocate for extreme thinness! I am just making an observation: the low end of our weight charts are the UPPER end of the weights of cultures who have impressive longevity.

My points are, related to whether we give the Halloween candy to the “less fortunate” families/kids, or do the whole world a favor by throwing it away:

  1. Kids who eat candy are HUNGRIER as a result. Sugar just fuels food obsession and cravings. So you fill their belly with fun-sized Snickers. Guess what: they then want MORE of it, not just in two hours, but the next day, and the next day, and the next. They are little addicts. Poor kids are America’s fattest kids. Sure, the poorest among us are the most addicted–but is it my job to feed the addictions?
  2. IS IT REALLY better to give them candy, than nothing? Pretty sure going without—(within reason, of course, I’m aware we do have to eat SOMETIME)—would be better. Less comfortable, but much healthier.
  3. It’s a matter of principle for me. I’m just not going to feed people toxic fuel. It goes against everything I believe in. It was HARD for me, at first, to throw candy away. I compost everything, for crying out loud! I grow my own food! I buy very little stuff in boxes and cans! BUT. If it’s poison for my kid (and it is!), it’s poison for everyone. Bottom line: I feel more guilty feeding someone else’s child candy than I do throwing out “perfectly good food.” Read about 1,000 books on the nutritional-deficiency health crisis in America as I have, and you will never look at candy the same way again. You will not see it as “food.”

I think I will make a new rule for myself, in honor of the reflecting I’ve done writing this blog entry.   From now on, for every $20 I pay my child to throw his candy away, I will also donate $20 (or more) to our homeless shelter, earmarked for raw plant foods. In fact, maybe I will come up with a fund to start making sure they have leafy green salads, and veggies and fruits at the shelters here.   Hmmmm, I’m glad I wrote this blog…..now I’m thinking about a plan……