More garden recipes, and a bedside update….

Thanks for all your kind emails and Facebook messages. I’ve been sleeping 12 hours a night since my accident Saturday; still unable to walk or do much of anything without acute/stabbing pain in my lower back/hip, and I wonder if it’s nerve damage, as I landed approximately on my hip’s sciatic nerve. I am hoping to get a PT friend of mine to come over today and start thinking about a diagnosis. My tennis team forfeits tomorrow without me. I am so used to boundless energy; thus this has been humbling. (I still plan to be in Boise and Twin Falls this weekend!)

Now, more from Michelle Jorgenson’s garden creating:

“So, next in the garden is rhubarb.   My family loves rhubarb, but you can only do so many things with it!   I’m still working to perfect the healthy rhubarb crumble, so I’ll send that some other time.   But, I did come up with a tasty fresh fruit crisp and some rhubarb strawberry jam.”

Rhubarb and Berry No-Bake Crisp

1 1/2 C chopped rhubarb

1/2 C water

1  T agave

1 C strawberries, sliced

1/2 C blueberries

1 C oatmeal

1/2 C pecans or almonds

1/4 C wheat germ

1/4 C coconut oil

1 T honey

pinch salt

1 t cinnamon

Put chopped rhubarb , agave and water in a small saucepan to cook.   Bring to boil and cook until rhubarb breaks up- about 3-5 minutes.   Remove from heat and cool.    Mix oatmeal. nuts, wheat germ, coconut oil, honey,  salt and cinnamon together in a bowl.  Add strawberries and blueberries to the cooled rhubarb.   Serve berries topped with the oatmeal mixture.   Can put plain yogurt sweetened with maple syrup on top.

Sugar Free Strawberry Rhubarb Freezer jam

4 C chopped strawberries

3 C chopped rhubarb

2 C water

2 T orange juice

6 T honey

6 packets stevia

2 packages unflavored vegan gelatin

Sprinkle gelatin over surface of water in a saucepan and let sit for a few minutes.   While it sits, chop the fruit.   Add chopped fruit and juice and bring to a boil.   Reduce to a simmer and cook until rhubarb starts to break up – 5-10 minutes.   Remove from heat and add sweeteners to taste.   Transfer to canning jars and close with lids.   Cool, then put in refrigerator or freezer.   Will thicken as it cools.

Makes about 5 pints

Mother’s Day Blueberry Dessert

The more you eat raw food, the simpler it becomes. When I’m by myself, what I eat at home tends to be bare-bones, if I’m not in restaurants with friends. But when I have a Sunday dinner for my family, or a special occasion, I make it fancier. I’m not always the greatest at planning ahead, so sometimes I open the fridge and make something up, based on one ingredient I’d like to use.

Yesterday my two youngest kids made a lovely Mother’s Day dinner. I had a quick brainstorm about how to make the two pints of blueberries (currently in season) in the fridge into a dessert.

I put some young Thai coconut meat (1/2 cup?) and coconut liquid (1/2 cup?) into my BlendTec, with a little lemon juice (1 Tbsp?) and agave (2 Tbsp?), plus some cashews (1/3 cup?) and 6 frozen strawberries. I whizzed it up into a cream sauce and served it with ½ cup blueberries in each of five crystal glasses as a parfait. Yum, everyone gobbled it up.

(I put question marks after the measurements because I didn’t measure, so these are guesses–don’t hold me to them!)

Raw green food and kidney stones

I have more requests to address oxalates.

It’s another one of those “they” things: first they tell us greens are good for us, and then they tell us oxalates will cause kidney stones and other problems.   Many people are fearful of kidney stones since they’re not only common (estimates are than 10 to 15 percent of Americans are diagnosed at some point), but also terribly painful.

Here’s the thing: it’s a gross oversimplification to say greens contain oxalates, oxalates cause kidney stones, and so you shouldn’t eat greens.   First of all, calcium is so plentiful and highly bioavailable in greens, and calcium binds to excess oxalates to render them harmless and easily removed from the body.   With all but a few serious health problems where specific nutrients are banned by your doctor, green foods are VITAL and should be eaten DAILY.   Some evidence says BLENDING oxalate-rich foods neutralizes it–voila, green smoothies!)

Foods high in oxalates include soy, beer, wheat, nuts, beets, chocolate, rhubarb, spinach, and strawberries.   I eat wheat, nuts, beets, chocolate, spinach, and strawberries regularly, most of them daily.   But if you have a problem with kidney stone formation, I would address eliminating three deadly S’s rather than greens: SODA, SUGAR, AND SALT.   Those chemically upset your body’s ability to utilize minerals like calcium and magnesium, leading to stones.

I know a schoolteacher who suffered with stones and eventually kidney failure, probably because for 30 years she didn’t want to have to leave her classroom to go to the bathroom, so she avoided drinking water.   Drink LOTS of water to avoid kidney stones!