Broken ribs, Thai Lettuce Wraps

Day 4. It turns out I have a couple of broken ribs. Good times! Ice and heat, ice and heat, and this morning seems a bit better than the past few days. But I am going to Boise and Twin Falls anyway, in 2 days!

One more recipe from Michelle’s garden to deal with the lettuce onslaught, one of my favorite things, Thai Lettuce Wraps:

Thai Lettuce Wraps

1 head lettuce – any kind, but a firmer leaf works better

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 thumb size piece of ginger, grated

1 red chili de-seeded and finely sliced (you can leave this out if you want it mild)

2 shallots, finely sliced

1 C firm tofu, chopped into small squares

1 carrot, grated

1 egg white, organic, free range

1/2 C shredded red cabbage

3 green onions

2 C larger sprouts (bean, sunflower)

3  T lime juice

2 T Nama Shoyu

2 T fish sauce (or more Nama Shoyu – but the fish sauce does make this taste really good!)

1 T agave

2 T olive oil

Put 1 T. oil into wok or large frying pan.   Stir-fry garlic, ginger, chili and shallot for one minute over medium high heat.   Add tofu, carrot, cabbage and green onions and the other T olive oil.   Stir-fry for one more minute.   Add lime juice, Nama Shoyu, fish sauce and agave while stir-frying.   Push ingredients to the side and add the egg white.   Mix in with other ingredients.   Add sprouts, stir and remove from heat.   Taste and add fish sauce or salt if needed.

Serve in lettuce leaves and eat by hand.

extra ingredients for green smoothies [part 3 of 7]

 

 

On to more green smoothie ingredients!

Lemon peel

Lemon peel is another ingredient I add almost daily.   I often buy a large bag of lemons at Costco, or I bring them home from California or Arizona when I visit there.   I freeze the lemon juice in ice cube trays for use in guacamole, raw desserts, and homemade salad dressings.   (Many recipes are found in Ch. 3 and 11 of 12 Steps to Whole Foods on GreenSmoothieGirl.com.)   But I don’t throw the lemon peels away!   I cut them in eighths (having washed the lemons well, first) and freeze them.   Every day I get a piece of lemon peel out of the freezer and toss it in my smoothie.   It’s a bit bitter, so it’s best when stevia or raw, organic is added to the mix to offset the bitter.

With its potent flavanoids, lemon peel has been linked by research to preventing and killing skin cancers.   As a teenager and young adult, I laid out in the sun for hours, nearly daily, from April to October.   I was always brown, but only after burning many times.   I’m more careful now, but still love the sun and never use sunscreen.   The only reason I can explain why I look younger than I am and have no skin cancer, despite being a fair-skinned redhead, is my excellent nutrition and near-daily use of lemon peel!

Sprouts

Sprouts are such an easy thing to grow, and most people don’t eat them at all.   They are living things, and they are enzyme packed little powerhouses.   When the seed, nut, or legume sprouts, all the enzyme potential is unlocked to go into that burst of energy that becomes a plant.   You have the opportunity, at that unparalleled nutritional level, to steal that nutrition for yourself.   Sprouts have the capacity to dramatically reduce your reliance on the body’s need to manufacture enzymes and consequently steal from metabolic processes.   When you eat them, you are oxygenating your body–think of eating sprouts as the very opposite of eating sugar and other toxic foods that make your body a host for all kinds of immediate and future problems.

They’re great on sandwiches, and I add them to granola I serve my children every morning.   But many people have a hard time finding ways to sneak them into the diet, and blending them into a smoothie is easy and painless.   Just add them as part of the greens portion of the recipe.  

I would not use sprouted nuts or large seeds like pumpkin and sunflower in green smoothies (unless you’re using “greened” sunflower sprouts–when the seed is grown into greens).   I would stick to the smaller seeds like clover, alfalfa, and fenugreek for green smoothie ingredients.

What did you make, when did you eat it, and where?

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl, what do you eat in a day?   Not only what did you eat, but WHERE were you when you ate it (soccer field, etc.), and when did you make it, etc.?

 

Answer:   I logged three weekdays  in a row, just for you.   (I think this question was a nice way of asking, do you spend your whole day in the kitchen, or are you busy like me?   Because if you’re in that kitchen for more than half an hour, I’m not even listening to you!)

 

Tuesday:  

 

Breakfast: the kids made themselves kefir blended with banana smoothie, and bowls of granola with sprouts added, and rice milk.   I made my Hot Pink Smoothie in less than five minutes and drank it out of a quart jar on the way to the gym.   (Always!   So boring, sorry.)

 

Lunch:   In front of the computer, I had a quart of green smoothie with some chips I made with sprouted wheat tortillas (under the broiler, brushed them with olive oil and sprinkled The Zip on them).   I had some guacamole with the chips (that I had in the fridge from yesterday).   The kid in charge of school lunch assembly made whole-wheat PB sandwiches, an apple, carrot sticks.   I stuck the kids’ green smoothies in the fridge for after school.

 

Dinner:   I made a hot dish called Amaranth L’Orange (coming out in Ch. 9) right before eating it, and my teenaged son made a salad, with some chopped squash and cucumbers and tomatoes in it (took each of us about 15 mins.).   I tossed some raw apple cider vinegar and extra virgin olive oil on, to avoid making a “real” dressing.   I ate mine in the car driving to a soccer practice, along with the remainder of my green smoothie from earlier.   Everybody else ate together except me and my son at soccer practice.

 

Wednesday:

 

Breakfast: same as above.

 

Lunch: took a quart of green smoothie to work, with a baggie of Chipotle Sprouted Almonds (Ch. 7).   Drank some of the green smoothie in the car on the way to work (at noon).   Finished teaching at 3:15 and had the rest of the GS and almonds driving home on the way to grab kids for sports practices.   Kid in charge of school lunch assembly made whole-wheat sandwiches and a baggie of cantaloupe slices, a baggie of sugar snap peas, and a Stretch Island fruit leather.

Dinner:   Had Southwest Quinoa Salad that I’d made and refrigerated a  couple of  hours earlier, with extra raw veggies in lieu of making another salad, because we were going in different directions to soccer games and this is an easy meal to take.   I grabbed some plastic cups and spoons to eat out of, at the game.   We also had some Oat-Coconut Cookies I’d made earlier (a mix recipe you’ll get in Ch. 11).

 

Thursday:

 

Breakfast: same as above.

 

Lunch:   had a quart of green smoothie (drank only about 2/3 of it), and leftover quinoa salad from last night, while working at the computer.     Kid in charge of school lunch assembly made bags of popcorn with coconut oil and seasonings (see Ch. 4), a bag of grapes, and a bag of baby carrots.

 

Dinner:   Threw together Cucumber-Tomato-Red Onion salad with garden veggies, with balsamic and olive oil (see Ch. 2), and made Turnip Buckwheat Casserole (coming out in Ch. 9).   Took about 30 mins. in the kitchen.   We all sat down and ate together at the kitchen table, a miracle in soccer season!

 

Anyone else trying to eat a plant-based diet of whole foods want to share what you ate in a day, when you made it, and where you ate it?   (Or anyone else eating the S.A.D., just to make the rest of us feel better? haha)