High-nutrition food storage

People in my community are dedicated to storing a year’s supply of food (myself included), and we are blessed to have many preparedness experts around us.   I struggled for years to achieve a food supply that we would actually eat, that wouldn’t go to waste because it’s so nutritionally inferior or has such a short shelf life.   (I threw out a lot of stuff over the years.)

I feel that I now have a solid food storage I can rotate into our diet.   So I’m including here a list of what’s in The Hatch.   That’s what we call our cold-storage room in the basement, in honor of our favorite ABC TV show, Lost.   I hope it helps you, and if you’re a preparedness guru, please share any ideas on what YOU store.

I know some of you will have to get creative, space-wise, to achieve any kind of storage, and perhaps you will want to consider starting with a three-month supply of food.)   Tons of natural disasters in the last couple of weeks, along with an international food shortage and skyrocketing fuel costs, have put food storage at the forefront of many of our minds.

I’ve put at the top of this list the things I feel are most nutritionally valuable in my list (the least important things are at the end).   For length, I’ve left off the list all the non-food items and dog food.

 

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Raw sauerkraut (from my garden cabbage)

Organic extra virgin coconut oil

Extra virgin olive oil

Raw legumes: small red, black turtle, small white, pinto, garbanzo, and 11-bean mix, plus lentils and split peas

Grains: popcorn, wheat, Kamut, quinoa, rye, oat groats, rolled oats, brown rice

Shredded coconut

Raisins

Nuts and seeds: raw almonds, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, cashews (many of these are in my upright full-size freezer)

Coconut juice (canned)

Raw apple cider vinegar (gallons are on sale right now at Good Earth, locals!)

Sweeteners: raw honey, raw agave, real maple syrup, blackstrap molasses, stevia

Spices: sea salt, kelp, cinnamon, cocoa powder, baking powder, basil, oregano, cayenne

Natural peanut butter

Whole-grain pasta

Canned: Powdered milk (to make kefir/yogurt)

Whole eggs

No-sugar-added spaghetti sauce

Canned diced tomatoes, and tomato sauce

Dehydrated fruits and vegs (bell peppers, onions, apples, bananas, mixed fruit)

Beans: black, vegetarian refried, garbanzos (for convenience)

Corn

Vegetarian chili

No-sugar-added applesauce

No-sugar-added peaches, mandarin oranges

Some other random items like canned black olives and liquid chlorophyll

Good, Better, Best . . . Part III

I have more stuff to say (and photos to blog) about traveling and eating right, but by request, I interrupt:

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl, will you please continue the good, better, best discussion, specifically covering pasta, seasonings, nut butters, and fats?

Pasta: white-flour pasta doesn’t belong in the kitchen of a health-conscious cook. The more coarsely you grind your wheat, the more nutritious it is, since the blood sugar uptake is slower. Good: whole-wheat pasta Better: whole-spelt or -kamut pasta (ancient, unhybridized grains) Best: homemade pasta made from ground whole grains, soaked 8-24 hours in advance (too time-consuming for me, but some like to do this)

Nut butters: grocery-store peanut butter has trans fats and sugar added. Good: organic, natural peanut butter Better: roasted almond butter Best: unsalted, homemade raw almond butter made from soaked, raw, dehydrated almonds (I put them through the Champion Juicer with the blank plate on)

Fats: almost everything sold in the grocery store is refined, high-heat treated and rancid. Good: extra-virgin olive oil, other unrefined oils (mostly found in health-food stores) Better: virgin/organic coconut oil, refrigerated flax oil, unrefined grapeseed oil Best: whole foods high in good fats like avocados, nuts, and seeds

Seasonings: many in the grocery store have MSG added even if you don’t see it on the label, as well as sugar and refined salt, and other  chemicals. Good: unrefined sea salt (50+ trace minerals, still actually very slightly refined) Better: Original Himalayan Crystal Salt (84 trace minerals), Mrs. Dash Best: Kelp, herbs like basil, thyme, oregano, salt-free and chemical-free organic seasonings like anything by Spice Hunter at your health-food store

Good, Better, Best . . . Part II

GRAINS

Good: eat whole grains and quit eating white flour.

Better: eat soaked whole grains (this requires planning a little ahead, as my cousin noted).

Best: eat sprouted, raw nuts, seeds, and grains.

SWEETENERS

(Note, that I am uneasy about fructose, xylitol, “organic sugar,” or dehydrated cane juice crystals—ways to spend extra money on refined options that really aren’t much better.   They’re maybe a 2 on a scale of 1 to 10, whereas sugar/corn syrup are a 1.   So I don’t even include them in the “good” category.)

Good (4 on a 1-10 scale): use Sucanat and honey  and real maple syrup instead of refined sugar and corn syrup.   They have a high glycemic index but also good nutrients and are not terribly acidic like refined sugars.

Better (7 on a 1-10 scale): use raw agave and stevia and molasses.   They have higher nutrition and  lower impact on blood sugar.

Best (10 on a 1-10 scale): use little or no concentrated sweeteners, just fruit and dates as treats or sweeteners.   They are high in fiber, lower in sugar, and highest in nutrition.

Your body and spirit will tell you when you’re ready to transition to the next level. If everything in you is resisting the “best” levels, then start with “good” and congratulate yourself, for now, rather than anguishing or beating yourself up.