Karla wins a 12 Steps manual and shares her 57-old athlete story!

good newsRight as I got home from my first trip on my 2014 book tour, I got this high-vibration letter from Karla in Arizona–hope you enjoy it!

Karla, I can relate to so much of this. I had plantar fasciitis, too, for nearly a year. This was devastating, as a competitive tennis player, until I got on top of it. I sat out while my team went to six-state Districts, which almost killed me! I’ve been symptom free for 3 years, even though my doc demanded I get steroid shots (I refused, and am glad I did). Plus, like you, I took up cycling, which gave me a new hobby/sport I totally LOVE, even now that I’m way past plantar fasciitis.

Eating an anti-inflammatory diet is key! No hybridized gluten grains, and minimal or no animal proteins, dairy, and sugar. What I did is eat my 12 Steps to Whole Foods diet, looking for LOTS of greens, and alkaline fruits and veggies, as the base of my pyramid. Your EVERY CELL will thank you. Inflammation is optional!

Here’s the letter from Karla, who is living life out loud, at the age of 59—so inspiring!

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl

6EF9879DB1D199012D7D6398A6051600I attended your presentation in Mesa last night with my husband, Rod. I was the very lucky winner of the 12 Steps Course Manual! I cannot begin to tell you how thrilled we both were to receive this valuable tool. The excited shriek you heard when read our number was genuine! THANK YOU!!

We love our green smoothies, and your website has inspired and taught us during our journey. We refer those who ask about what we are doing to your website. You have been our “guru.” We thank you so much for sharing your knowledge with us. And for the amazing gift we won—we are so excited to incorporate more healthy eating and improve our health even more!

Last year, we decided to cut way back on meat and dairy and try to eat a plant-based diet. Rod has read the China Study, and we watched Food Inc., Forks over Knives, and Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead, all of which are amazing documentaries on health and food. We have an amazing green smoothie story!

Two years ago, I was diagnosed with plantar fasciitis—a tendon inflammation in the arch that goes up the heel. It felt like someone stuck a red hot poker up my heel every morning when I would step out of bed. Rod and I were avid hikers and this was devastating, as walking at all was very painful. The podiatrist said, “Ride a bike.”

That was life-changing advice. We were riding 10 – 20 miles at a time and discovered a network of bike trails here in the Phoenix area. We started green smoothies, and bought a Blendtec.

life-life-is-beautiful-quotes-text-favim-com-511717We eventually began training for an 85-mile race—I was turning into an athlete at age 57! Last year we did two CENTURY rides!

Last year, Rod and I rode 5,000 miles, and we sacrificed a bike ride in 70 degree weather to come and hear you speak last night!  Cycling has been a wonderful hobby that we enjoy together, and green smoothies are our fuel every day.

Every day is amazing. I feel better than I have felt in over a decade! And I will turn 59 in June. People ask me what I am doing—how does my skin look so good? I don’t wear any foundation makeup, so I don’t hide my age spots and wrinkles, but my skin glows and that is what people see.

Love to you,

Karla LaMunyon, Peoria, AZ

 

My tennis team stages a DRUG INTERVENTION

My team staged a drug intervention for me, last weekend.

We participated in a tournament that, if we won it, gave us a wild-card seat at our Districts playoffs in August, without having to win our division. By Saturday at 7 p.m., I’d played three matches in less than 24 hours, and won all three. We also had three team wins. That put us in the finals match against Sports Mall, whom we have always considered our fiercest competition.

Our captain, Pam, had me slated to play singles in the final match, and she was strategizing the lineup to be able to count on 3 wins and 2 losses—I was one of the wins she needed to bank on.

I’ve been struggling with Plantar Fasciitis for over a year. It went away for a few months in the winter, but when I’m playing tennis almost daily, it comes back, and it HURTS.

Plus two of my toes were banged up and bleeding, with a nail threatening to fall off, from so much high-impact in the summer heat, in the same shoes. My bloody sock was draped over my armrest, and I was sitting there icing my foot after the 3rd match, when the little army of my 7 teammates confronted me.

Them: We want you to take these. [They point at 4 Ibuprofen they’ve laid out on the table.]

Me, laughing: You guys, I never take drugs. If I take those, I’ll probably have to go curl up in the corner of the court and sleep it off. Or it might make me loopy. Or something. Who knows.

Them, sternly, hands on hips: Take TWO then.

Me: [long pause] All right, okay, how about this: I’ll take ONE!

So I did. I won my singles match easily, in two sets, as darkness fell, and my team pulled out the 3 wins that we needed to take the tournament and go to Districts.

I guess I’m not that extreme even though I don’t have any Advil or Tylenol in my house. There’s a time and a place. Like, when you’re being pressured by a bunch of mom-athletes ganged up on you with their hands on their hips! You’ve heard of “interventions” to get someone to STOP taking drugs? I wonder if what happened last weekend is the first time an intervention has been staged to make someone TAKE them!

The photo is of the four of us who played every match and didn’t lose any: Shelli, Meagan, Pam, and me. GO TEAM!

Independence Day, part 1 of 2

Here are photos after my family’s annual 5K run at Provo’s Freedom Festival.

Runners in the photo are my dad, my son Cade, my brother Ben, my sister Betsy, and her husband Matt. (And my mom, who walked.)

Also here’s a random photo of my bro-in-law Matt and me doing a fashion shoot using my mom’s stylin’ bathrobes. (I went in her closet for a coverup because it was chilly after the race. My bro Ben said, “You’ve gone from cold to old.” Matt would like me to write that he is NOT pregnant–it’s the shape of the robe, not him.)

The race, on asphalt, exacerbated this horrific case of plantar fasciitis I’ve developed. On facebook, readers suggested these things that I am now trying: massage, Strassburg Sock at night, ice it, barefoot running, wearing shoes with supports in the house. I just gave up running, tennis, and Zumba for now, in favor of biking, Stairmaster, and weightlifting (ugh).

Anyone else get rid of it? If so, what did you do??

I ran it 5 minutes faster than I did 5 years ago. I beat everyone but Ben and my 16 year old son who has legs “up to here.” I’ve never beat my dad until this year. It’s fun to run with him because he talks about everything he sees as we go along (so, you have to turn your iPod down to chat with him). He turned 67 last month and guess what he did on his birthday. He ran 4 miles, just like he does every day!

My grandmother used to say, “It’s not what you do now and then, that will save or kill you–it’s what you do every day.” I believe my extended family’s excellent health is because of two things. First, the example we had and habit we formed of eating a primarily plant-based diet. Second, the example we had of being physically active. Breaking a sweat every day.

One of the most enduring memories I have of my dad is when I’d get up at 5 a.m. to practice the piano and go to seminary. He’d come home from his paper routes and his run, before work as an Air Force Lt. Colonel, Defense Intelligent Agent in the Pentagon.

I remember it well because he’d always want to talk: he’s Seinfeld’s infamous “close talker” and I have a sizeable “personal space” bubble. He’s the biggest patriot I know–a Vietnam veteran with a huge American flag cemented in his front yard. He’s one of those people who does the right thing, day after day, consistently. He’s my hero. In fact, I think I’ll tell a little story about him tomorrow.

Here are photos after my family’s annual 5K run at Provo’s Freedom Festival.

Runners in the photo are my dad, my son Cade, my brother Ben, my sister Betsy, and her husband Matt. (And my mom, who walked.)

Also here’s a random photo of my bro-in-law Matt and me doing a fashion shoot using my mom’s stylin’ bathrobes. (I went in her closet for a coverup because it was chilly after the race. My bro Ben said, “You’ve gone from cold to old.” Matt would like me to write that he is NOT pregnant–it’s the shape of the robe, not him.)

The race, on asphalt, exacerbated this horrific case of plantar fasciitis I’ve developed. On facebook, readers suggested these things that I am now trying: massage, Strassburg Sock at night, ice it, barefoot running, wearing shoes with supports in the house. I just gave up running, tennis, and Zumba for now, in favor of biking, Stairmaster, and weightlifting (ugh).

Anyone else get rid of it? If so, what did you do??

I ran it 5 minutes faster than I did 5 years ago. I beat everyone but Ben and my 16 year old son who has legs “up to here.” I’ve never beat my dad until this year. It’s fun to run with him because he talks about everything he sees as we go along (so, you have to turn your iPod down to chat with him). He turned 67 last month and guess what he did on his birthday. He ran 4 miles,  just like he does every day!

My grandmother used to say, “It’s not what you do now and then, that will save or kill you–it’s what you do every day.” I believe my extended family’s excellent health is because of two things. First, the example we had and habit we formed of eating a primarily plant-based diet. Second, the example we had of being physically active. Breaking a sweat every day.

One of the most enduring memories I have of my dad is when I’d get up at 5 a.m. to practice the piano and go to seminary. He’d come home from his paper routes and his run, before work as an Air Force Lt. Colonel, Defense Intelligent Agent in the Pentagon.

I remember it well because he’d always want to talk: he’s Seinfeld’s infamous “close talker” and I have a sizeable “personal space” bubble.   He’s the biggest patriot I know–a Vietnam veteran with a huge American flag cemented in his front yard. He’s one of those people who does the right thing, day after day, consistently. He’s my hero. In fact, I think I’ll tell a little story about him tomorrow.