Nutrition for pregnant moms, babies, toddlers…..part 1 of 5

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl: My baby is breastfeeding, and doing great. But I know I have to make the transition. Besides blending cooked vegetables, what else should I do?

Answer: Please share this blog series with anyone with a baby, or anyone thinking about starting a family.

What I’m about to tell you is worth more than money could buy. I wish I’d had this information before I even conceived my oldest son.

I must make this disclaimer first: My comments should not stand in for competent medical advice. Talk to your naturopathic medical doctor or other qualified, holistic practitioner before implementing these or any other strategies.

In my opinion, the information I want to share with you in this blog series is worth more than the four-year degree I got before going to grad school. I’m crushed that I spent a year feeding my son crap (on the advice of a pediatrician!) before I studied hard (many sources), learned the truth, executed on it, and forever changed my entire family’s future, for the better.

What I’m going to write here is a digest of what I learned during years of intensive study, when my first child was very ill with asthma. He was constantly choking on yellow and green mucous coming out of his nose, which meant it was all over in his head, throat, and throughout his body. No babies or children who have yellow and green mucous are healthy.

The mucous made his tiny body the perfect acidic, sluggish, anaerobic environment for getting every little virus that came down the pike. Which led to more asthma. Which led to more drugs. Which led to more mucous production, along with the dairy and sugar and chemical-added “foods” I fed him. You get the idea?

But I didn’t know that, then. I was a deer in headlights. A young mother with little information. Overweight and struggling with my own major health problems.

I’m even more crushed to think that not only did I lose a year to total ignorance, as I began my career as a mother, but there are women everywhere who would do anything for their kids, but they have no clue about the devastating consequences of following their pediatricians’ nutritional recommendations. And they follow bad counsel from doctors who are untrained in nutrition, for years.

(Mine said to pump my little guy full of pus- and bacteria- and steroid- and antibiotic-tainted milk of another animal. Of course he didn’t call it that. That’s me being sarcastic. He said to feed him lots of milk. And if I couldn’t get enough bottles of milk in him, I should just add a few scoops of artificially colored, sugar-sweetened NESTLE QUIK. When my son’s weight fell precipitously, he said to feed him lots of ICE CREAM.

A grad student I met after one of my lectures in Arizona last year told me she’d interned with that same pediatrician. And she told me he’s still giving people the same awful advice. She said he tells his patients, “Vegetables and fruits are just fiber. All babies need is milk, for strong bones. Lots of it.”)

What happens when we follow standard pediatric advice?

I turned my oldest son from a 8 lbs. 9 oz., 23” healthy newborn, to a Failure to Thrive, barely breathing, blue, constantly ill baby so underweight he fell below the 5th percentile. Following his pediatrician’s advice.

And then I stopped doing what the pediatrician said to do. I stopped buying what the pediatrician was feeding his own family. Baby formula made from dairy, then dairy milk and cheese and popsicles and white bread and chicken nuggets, hot dogs. Peanut butter and jelly. Maybe some cooked veggies now and then, a banana and an apple each day, just to feel better about my parenting.

And when I STOPPED doing what my culture’s parenting standards dictated, and started following true principles in nutrition, all the problems disappeared. My boy became strong, robust, healthy, 6’3”.

He went on to lead the state in RBI’s (runs batted in) his senior year of high school and pitch in the final two games of the state playoffs.

If he doesn’t achieve his destiny, it’s damn well not going to be because I failed him.

What I’m going to write in this blog series is worth many books I’ve read, and lets you just dismiss a lot of the OTHER books and web sites I wasted time on.

Most published nutrition advice is heavily influenced by the industries who created the mentality that there’s a dairy product for every nutritional need, and a drug for every medical problem.

What I’m about to write could mean that your family never uses an antibiotic again. (We haven’t, for over 17 years.) That you use M.D.’s only if you break an arm or get in a car accident. Isn’t that the ideal? Where did we get the idea that we have to lean heavily on doctors, because we’re so often sick, and cannot problem-solve our family’s own minor issues?

My next post reviews breastfeeding versus the alternatives. How long to nurse your baby, and what to do if you can’t.

Recovering from oral surgery…..part 2 of 3

 

Dr. Wall gave me IV Vitamin C during the procedure.  I am also using ACS and ACZ, to kill micro-organisms and safely remove them from the body.

I told the anaesthesiologist I wanted no benzodiazipenes.  Jeanette, also a patient of Dr. Wall’s, warned me that the anaesthesiologist wouldn’t like that. She was right; he didn’t. He pitched me on using these “date rape” drugs. He said they would protect me from the memory of the traumatic surgery, and he said he would recommend them for his own loved ones.

(Of course he would—those who operate in drug use every day are very comfortable with them. I am always wary of advice from pharmacists, drug reps, and drug-intensive medical practitioners. They’re good people, but they come from a different planet than the one I come from, ‘nuff said. I’m glad they are there, when we need them, don’t get me wrong. But I think massive caution is needed, with drugs in general.)

I stood my ground, he used no benzo’s, and I have no memory of the surgery. Not only that, but by the time I was driven home 90 minutes after surgery, I worked on my computer for the rest of the day and went to bed at the normal time and slept a normal amount, 6 hours. I felt fine and went first thing in the morning back to Salt Lake to watch my team play.

I experienced ZERO pain for three days. Shocking! He dug out roots of my teeth all the way up into the jaw, he debrided the jaw bone of any decay, and did a bone graft. I have stitches not only over the place where teeth once were, but also up high in the gums, where the tips of the roots were. He also did some major work on the other side of my mouth, redoing fillings that date back many years, 14 individual procedures total, in 5 hours. On Day 4, I did feel a little bruised.

All I can figure, with so little pain, is that this doctor is a genius, as Dr. Ulm’s practice told me he was. He did excellent, precise work, rather than tear up my mouth. I can’t say enough good about Dr. Wall.

I’m on a mostly liquid diet. Dr. Wall found that amalgam was NOT entirely removed from my mouth 10 years ago. He dug out another chunk of it. L I am glad to have that done. But I basically now can’t chew on either side of my mouth very well.

Fortunately I can drink lots of green smoothies and vegetable juices. I’m also drinking Rejuvelac every day. A good idea anyway, since I need to detox from the pleomorphic organisms that were trapped in what Dr. Wall told me, post-surgery, was TWO failed root canals. He said, “We knew the front tooth’s root canal had failed, from the imaging, but the roots of the back one that I dug out were decayed, too, through the jaw bone!”

I am so glad, now, that I had this procedure done. (My tennis team won against two states the day of surgery, but then lost to teams from Boise and Las Vegas anyway, the next day. I am traveling so much in October and November, I didn’t feel I could wait.)

It’s a little weird to be missing two teeth, not gonna lie. Americans are conditioned to keep our teeth, cosmetic concerns over health, at any cost. (I intend to value the cosmetic and functional aspects, too, by getting an implant to replace the front tooth.)

My main thought is, what a travesty to spend so much energy eating the right food, juicing and blending vegetables, traveling all over Kingdom Come teaching others about it…..and having deadly pleomorphic organisms mutating and moving all around my body, undoing the good work that nutrition, and my body’s defenses, were doing.

More thoughts on our dental choices, tomorrow.

Antibiotics and dental surgery….do I agree with taking AB’s preventatively? Part 1 of 2

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl:

I think you are pretty conservative and avoid antibiotics, but I had an interesting experience recently in my dental practice that I want to share with you.  You influence a lot of people to make better choices for their health, and if you agree with me and my position as a health care provider and trying to do what is in the best interest of my patients, maybe you can pass this on to your readers.

The AAOS (american academy of orthopaedic surgeons) currently recommends that persons who have had total joint replacementsshould take one dose of antibiotics one hour prior to high risk dental procedures (not a whole week of antibiotics, just one dose) to avoid bacteremias forming in the artificial joint and causing a systemic infection and possibly failure of the artificial joint.  I had a patient recently who refused to take an antibiotic before a procedure because she avoids taking antibiotics in general.

Hand holding pillsI contacted her orthopaedic surgeon, and the nurse from his office recommended the same protocol for her, and she still refused.  She walked out of my office informing me there was no way she was going to take the antibiotics and she would find another dentist who would do the work without making her take the antibiotics.  I worry about her health and the risks she is taking.  I also worry about the dentist she finds to treat her without following the standards of care, as his license may be in jeopardy for treating her this way if complications were to arise anytime down the road.

I try to avoid antibiotics whenever I can for myself, but there are times when it may be worth the major complications which could arise.  I am not willing to put my license and my career on the line to treat someone who refuses to follow the written protocols and standards of care for surgeries which they have had done in the past, which now place them in a higher risk category.  I don’t know if you understand what I am saying here, but let me know if you agree or disagree with me.

Sincerely,

Dr. G.L.

Should I shut the heck up about all things not green smoothie?…..Part 6 of 7

About Dr. L telling me I should not talk about toxic dental practices and stick to whole foods topics only?

That is precisely the reason I have a blog in the first place.

I don’t want my readers to be as ignorant as I was when I was 27 years old and allowing doctors to tell me to feed my little boy spoonfuls of liquid steroids. I had dentists wanting to fill holes in his teeth with mercury as he got older (luckily, I never allowed that in any of my children). I’m livid that a dentist sent me home with little blue fluoride pills to feed my baby, not giving me the very real “other side” to the recommendation to have him eat sodium fluoride!

(Fortunately, in the case of the little blue pills, they sat there and expired during the two years after filling the prescription—I felt guilty every time I saw them, but I could not make myself feed them to my little boy. And fortunately, I knew enough that no child of mine has ever had an amalgam filling.)

I don’t have any interest in denigrating any profession.  Certainly not dentists. I have had email correspondences with Dr. L since he attended a class I taught two years ago, and I know him to be a thoughtful, purposeful, open-minded vegetarian athlete who influences his patients for good.

However, I hope more dentists self-educate to offer other options and educate their patients against toxic practices. I’m sure it would be scary to have many practices that underpin your livelihood called into question—dentists carry debt on expensive equipment to perform these procedures and use these materials. But I’m not the researchers who have documented valid, massive concerns for the public health. I’m just one person waving a red flag towards it.

But I’m fierce that since I am blessed with an audience, I hope for my readers to start YOUNGER THAN I DID—or at any point!—with knowledge about controversies regarding their health. That way they won’t unwittingly allow unnecessary root canals in their mouth, as I did.

I hope my readers learn to QUESTION AUTHORITY. I don’t mean REJECT all authority across the board. I mean make your own decisions, do your own thinking, use your intuition. Study an issue well before doing something like fossilizing a dead tooth, or feeding your baby little blue pills of a known poison, or injecting your child with, well, anything. Expect that major industries—all of them—have an agenda. That agenda is often in conflict with the public health.

Don’t believe everything you read on the internet. Learn to be a savvy consumer of information so you know what’s more likely to be true, and less likely. (In the intro to 12 Steps to Whole Foods, I write about evaluating research.)

I will not go silent on subjects where I think we are asleep at the wheel.

 

I may not be an “expert,” as Dr. L wanted me to know. But I am a HUGE FAN of parents becoming educated about the chemicals they feed their little ones. We should become layperson experts as much as possible—these issues have massive implications.

And while I believe dentists are good people trying to help us (Dr. L states that I am criticizing dentists), they do not always understand the implications of our drinking and eating synthetic fluoride.

If that’s the criticism—that I shouldn’t blog about dental issues because I’m not qualified—well, then, I’m not an expert on whole foods either. He didn’t like the quotes I used by a chemist, and he dismissed an entire book on the fluoride travesty by a journalist, because the journalist wrote a book for money so clearly he fabricated a fake controversy.

Adding fluoride to water is forced medication, and it’s not a fake controversy. It’s a real controversy for good reasons. Even if I accept Dr. L’s belief that children have fewer cavities if they drink fluoride or take fluoride pills, he offers no evidence that it’s safe for other organs and systems, to ingest it regularly. That’s because there IS no evidence of its safety. There is plenty of cause for concern and many studies documenting how dangerous it is.

If you feel that my blog should be limited to non-controversial topics related to whole foods only, perhaps you can just skip any posts on other topics? I’m a renegade, and this is a counter-culture blog. It just is.

If I’m blogging 5 times a week, for nearly 5 years now…..I don’t want to have limitations like that. I want to talk about what’s on my mind. Eating whole foods and giving the S.A.D. the boot will always be my favorite topic, though, so come back soon for more on that!

Tomorrow, I will post some interesting comments from a dentist who wrote in with her opinion on my comments on amalgam fillings and root canals.

(To access the other posts in this series, Click Here.)

Can you stand ONE more comment about PSA and prostate cancer?

One last comment about PSA. We have people at both ends of the spectrum writing us. Some are furious that their loved one died of the treatment. Others are indignant that we don’t see what a wonderful gift the PSA test is for saving lives. I think this brief experience Dave R. wrote us is worth bringing front and center:

“Thanks for the article.  I went in for a routine physical a couple of years ago (I’m a scout leader and needed one for summer camp).  My doctor suggested that I should have a PSA test.  I said fine.  My PSA count was moderately high for my age and I was referred to a specialist.  The specialist confirmed the readings and suggested a biopsy.  I procrastinated the biopsy for a year and then finally went in for the procedure.  It was not only uncomfortable, but painful.  My doctor said that the biopsy was negative and told me that in his opinion, I will never have prostate cancer.  In fact, he has never had a patient with a negative biopsy ever get prostate cancer.  This should be the end of a moderate to good story, but now I am considered uninsurable unless I’m included on a big companies heath plan.  Just because I had a moderately high PSA test!  I wouldn’t advise anyone to get a PSA test.  I’ve heard too many other horror stories.”

Thank you for sharing that, Dave, and I’m sorry it happened to you. I know several people who have been tormented for years by Dept. of Family Services for not administering the drugs that pediatricians demanded their child take. When you go in for an ear infection, that simply isn’t an outcome you expect! I worried about that, myself, since I had a child with chronic ear infections but never gave her an antibiotic (I did get tubes in her ears, however), and I needed the pediatrician to work with me, and know that AB’s were not my remedy of choice. To that end, I had to change pediatricians.

I’m sure Dave never counted on getting a PSA resulting in his becoming “uninsurable” and being forced to work for only big companies.

dentists, and taking antibiotics

Here’s a letter I got recently from a wonderful dentist who reads this blog/site. I won’t give my own response until I hear some of yours. What are your thoughts?

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl:

I think you are pretty conservative and avoid antibiotics, but I had an interesting experience recently in my dental practice that I want to share with you.   You influence a lot of people to make better choices for their health, and if you agree with me and my position as a health care provider and trying to do what is in the best interest of my patients, maybe you can pass this on to your readers.   The AAOS (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons) currently recommends that persons who have had total joint replacements should take one dose of antibiotics one hour prior to high risk dental procedures (not a whole week of antibiotics, just one dose) to avoid bacteremias forming in the artificial joint and causing a systemic infection and possibly failure of the artificial joint.   I had a patient recently who refused to take an antibiotic before a procedure because she avoids taking antibiotics in general.

I contacted her orthopaedic surgeon, and the nurse from his office recommended the same protocol for her, and she still refused.   She walked out of my office informing me there was no way she was going to take the antibiotics and she would find another dentist who would do the work without making her take the antibiotics.   I worry about her health and the risks she is taking.   I also worry about the dentist she finds to treat her without following the standards of care, as his license may be in jeopardy for treating her this way if complications were to arise anytime down the road.

I try to avoid antibiotics whenever I can for myself, but there are times when it may be worth the major complications which could arise.   I am not willing to put my license and my career on the line to treat someone who refuses to follow the written protocols and standards of care for surgeries which they have had done in the past, which now place them in a higher risk category.   I don’t know if you understand what I am saying here, but let me know if you agree or disagree with me.

Are “eating healthy” and “obsessed” synonymous? Part 2 of 3

Regarding faux diagnoses: I’m always frustrated when someone wants to create a pathology out of something healthy, as with this “orthorexia” thing that a number of readers wrote us about.

Fact is, before we had artificially-colored Cheez Whiz and a few generations of exposure to it, that kind of “food” would have been shunned. If you’d squirted a blob of it on a plate and put the can next to it, folks in 1875 would have skirted it, poked at it, maybe sniffed it…..but wouldn’t they have been terrified to actually eat it? They certainly would have never seen that color before. Imagine being at an 1875 farmhouse and explaining the ingredients of Cheez Whiz to the inhabitants.

If your senses weren’t dulled and changed by ubiquitous processed foods, wouldn’t Cheez Whiz seems like a really terrible, crazy idea? Yet now we are 180 degrees from there, where you have an eating disorder if you WON’T eat the Cheez Whiz.

So if we go back to eating the way people did for thousands of years–before cancer, heart disease, and autoimmune diseases became common–now we are mentally ill.

I’m sure you’re not surprised to learn I reject coining the word “orthorexia.”

But. The way folks have made a healthy idea pathological is through “guilt by association.” Fact is, a lot of people who are really healthy eaters are ….. no offense if this hits close to home for anyone …… kinda neurotic people in general. In fact, their healthy eating comes from being a rather paranoid, fear-based person.

So, because some people who eat all-raw are, um, kinda “weird,” by mainstream America’s standards ….. then eating high-raw, by association, is weird. So goes the logic. And bam, we’ve got ourselves a new diagnostic label to toss around the internet.

Okay, so this is a tricky subject. I’m not naming any names. But just by nature of the subject matter on this site, I get TONS of email from people who sound like they’re losing a lot of sleep, over food. Lots of regular people read this blog, but some folks struggle with excesses of uptightness. They worry about all kinds of details, trying to find the “right” diet.

An older reader recently mentioned on this blog that her new learning curve about health and nutrition has resulted in family members calling her “obsessed.”

I replied that I think that’s what it looks like, when your eyes first open. It’s pretty natural to upset the equilibriums in your life initially, when you learn truths that you may have known nothing about for 50 years. You’re shocked, you’re excited, you feel like the scales have fallen from your eyes and everyone else around you is still in the dark!

You overachievers don’t do things in a small way. So suddenly you are voraciously reading everything you can get your hands on. You read all 12 steps in my course and try to do it all overnight. You listen to the audio files from 12 Steps in your car (for the 4th time) and feel resentful when a family member makes a snide comment. You carry your high-lighted, battered manual in your purse for when you get a spare 10 minutes to plan your groceries. You find yourself having a conversation with a stranger in the grocery store line about The China Study.

Sound familiar? (If so, it’s because I’m not making this stuff up. I’m taking it as examples from things y’all have told me, at classes or in emails.) More tomorrow about how “weird” I was when I started on this journey and what a healthier place looks like, once all the pieces settle into awesome habits.

Are “eating healthy” and “obsessed” synonymous?” [part 1 of 3]

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl (from Linda):

“I just received an e-mail earlier today from a friend who considers herself a very healthy eater (she’s a nurse) with a link to the following article “New Eating Disorders: Are They For Real?” about newly discovered or classified eating disorder, Orthorexia.

“It says: ‘Orthorexia is Latin for ‘correct eating.’’ Here, too, the focus isn’t on losing weight. Instead, sufferers increasingly restrict their diets to foods they consider pure, natural and healthful. Some researchers say that Orthorexia may combine a touch of obsessive compulsive disorder with anxiety and warn that severely limited “healthy” diets may be a stepping stone to anorexia nervosa, the most severe – and potentially life-threatening – eating disorder.’

“Linda continues: Okay, I say, but I am not “severely limiting” my healthful foods, I eat quite a variety, probably more than the average adult. My weight is well within normal limits, and I do not worry too much about calories or restrictions, other than making a clear attempt to eat unprocessed whole natural foods, as much raw as I can.

“So, this doesn’t seem to apply to me…. But then the article goes on to say…”Orthorexics: Those affected may start by eliminating processed foods, anything with artificial colorings or flavorings as well as foods that have come into contact with pesticides. Beyond that, orthorexics may also shun caffeine, alcohol, sugar, salt, wheat and dairy foods. Some limit themselves to raw foods.”

“Hmmmm, like that is something bad, say, compared to eating unlimited junk food, highly processed food and foods with pesticides? But that was not enough: the article goes on to describe the TREATMENT the newly classified Orthorexic needs in order to be “cured”, I guess, of their disease/condition! Wow, this is the kind of stuff that I find myself running up against since I took up a whole foods, high raw diet just over two years ago.

“I say very little at this point to anyone about what I choose to eat or not, and this is very sad to me, since I am trying to just be the example of what good fitness/nutrition can be. This just seems to put the ultimate stamp of “disapproval” on the way many of us are choosing to eat to circumvent GMO, pesticides, processed foods and additives. Robyn, I have to give you credit that you can keep up the good fight despite resistance, but would love to know what you do when confronted with this type of information?

“This is the link: http://health.yahoo.net/experts/dayinhealth/new-eating-disorders-are-they-real.”

Robyn’s answer: in my next post!

A tribute to the late, great Paul Leatham

If you’ve heard me speak, you’ve likely heard me refer to Paul Leatham, one of the greatest influences of my life. Shortly before I spoke in San Diego last month, I got an email that he had passed away. He was 63 and died of lingering complications from a motorcycle accident.

When my first child was extremely ill and my own life was destroyed by caring for him, being up all night, and worrying, three people told me to go see Paul.   I have a strange pattern in my life of important things happening in three’s. So the third time, I moved heaven and earth to get to Paul Leatham’s lecture immediately and implement his counsel.

I listened with great skepticism. At that moment in my life, I was fully in the throes of administering drugs to my son for his problems, trusting the doctors, and embracing Pop Culture and its dietary excesses. I had a brand new master’s degree and thought I was kind of smart. I liked science and proof, and I disliked charlatans selling stuff and making big claims.

I was also desperate. Therefore my mind opened a crack. His lecture covered many unconventional topics, but I thought about the content for weeks and it made more and more sense.

Paul Leatham wasn’t even selling anything.

He’s the one who insisted we eat a 60-80% raw, 95%+ plant-based diet. That’s what I have done since I heard him speak 16 years ago until now. It has changed my life profoundly for the good. And his work has cascaded into influence on far more than just me and my kids.

He was a self-educated iridologist and told me things about my own health that rang true, just from examining a complex system of lesions and other evidence in the irises of my eyes that correspond to body systems and organs. Every single thing he said to me was true.

For instance, he said, looking at my irises through a microscope: “Your right ovary is very weak.” (He didn’t know it, but I had recently had a ruptured ectopic pregnancy, wherein my right ovary basically exploded, and I nearly bled to death before a doctor cut me open and stopped the bleeding to save my life.  I would have been dead at 27 if it weren’t for a medical doctor.)

So yes, it’s fair to say my right ovary was very weak. There was only a piece of it left.

He taught me to nurture my adrenal glands, that were burned out from stress and sugar.

He reinforced my early-in-life lessons (from my grandmother’s and uncle’s cancer) that food can heal us. It can destroy us, too. But it can be profoundly powerful in putting us back together.

I will forever be indebted to Paul Leatham. I didn’t know him well, personally, just listened to his lectures several times and followed his program. I will spend the rest of my life trying to be one-tenth the teacher he was.

I have been praying for his family (wife Wendy and 9 children). May they be blessed because of the great work that Paul did.

The rest of the story with Rich the Pharmacist. Part 1 of 2.

So here’s the rest of the story with Rich, my first high-school boyfriend. I told you how I ran into him on the plane on his way to pharmacists’ immunization training, and he helped us out in Seattle.

I told him, as we reminisced, that before I straightened out my lifestyle, I was 26 and weighed 206 lbs. I was walking in the mall trying to induce labor 2 days after my due date. I saw him and cheerfully said, “Hey Rich!” He looked at me, like, “No comprendo!” and walked right on by. He literally hadn’t recognized me. I was mortified.

Guiltily, he said, “Well, I relate to that. I saw you getting out on the curb, outside. I didn’t even want to approach you because I am ashamed about how I look.”

With 70% of America overweight, I often get the sense that the vast majority of us feel trapped inside someone else. We barely recognize ourselves. Can’t believe this happened to us. Just a five-pound weight gain annually is obesity, in a decade. That’s gaining just ounces a month.

And it seems almost sudden that, in mid-life, we’re ashamed and shocked that we got this way and we wonder how it happened and where’s the way out.

Rich texted me after we were both home in Utah. This is part of it:

“If I do this I want to do it full on, full tilt, full bore, hardcore, never look back, no holds barred, past the point of no return. If I am going to approach it like that, I figure I need the very best tools.”

(He then asks me to hook him up with a BlendTec.)

About the lecture in Seattle, he said:

You gave me hope. I’ve listened to so many doctors, psychologists, “professional” pharmacists, counselors with all their psycho-babble and I can tell they are just saying what they’ve been told to say. You and I talked about people who claim to be experts on nutrition but who look like the ‘before’ poster for a weight-loss program.

“Because of the way I know you, I was already open to your message. I watched you very closely, as you talked to a long line of people after the lecture about their very personal problems and hopes and challenges. To make sure you’re the same Robyn with whom we hid our affection for each other when we were young. And, you are. Just more secure and wiser. Your smile never turned and your enthusiasm never changed.

“Because I am apple shaped rather than pear shaped, people are surprised to know that I carry all my weight in my upper body. So I can still bench press 225 a few times, but I have to wear a C-pap at night with supplemental oxygen so I don’t stop breathing and suffocate. My lungs have more weight pressing on them than they can handle. If I could become one of your miracles, I could kick the C-pap habit. That would be worth so much more than money could buy. I guess I don’t have to tell you that. Look at me, preaching to the choir.”

A few days ago, a GSG reader pushed back on this blog, not just once but more–against my stating that YOU CAN’T AFFORD TO EAT HOT DOGS.

I always appreciate pushback, because it keeps an honest conversation going. But I’ll tell you what I think of that tomorrow.