WINNERS from my last post, back to Dr. Wall for a checkup

Look who won the fabulous Zen Society skin care products—I’m sure you’ll love them like I do!

Candi Nicholls, Lehi UT  84043

Sarah Peterson, Suwanee GA 30024

Deidre Gibb, Los Angeles, CA 90066

Congrats, ladies!

I went back to Dr. Wall to get my stitches out yesterday. I’m now missing two back teeth, and 5 fillings on the OTHER side of my mouth are re-excavated and filled, plus a “bone graft,” (really it’s just implanting my own blood, spun down to stem cells, a fibrin-rich plug that allows you to BUILD bone where the jawbone was excavated). In six months, that bone will be ready to accept a zirconium implant, screwed in. I’m not going to fossilize any dead teeth in my mouth, ever again—but that doesn’t mean I don’t want pretty, white, straight teeth! None missing! If I do implants to replace both my lost teeth, my total bill for all these procedures will be about $14,000.

I told Dr. Wall the task of the biological dentist is to give us a beautiful, white smile, without killing us in the process.

I’ve had a hard time eating much else besides smoothies, vegetable juice, and soups.

Tomorrow, I’m sharing a couple of YUMMY soup recipes we made up, with our garden produce, to help me limp along on my liquid diet.

This time, my Bioscan was 87,000. Up 7,000 from 2.5 months ago. That’s a super-way-crazy-psycho high score. I was glad to know that my antioxidants are still gonzo, because if you have a raging infection, your cells are gobbling up nutrient reserves, and FAST. Dr. Wall said everything is healing brilliantly and my bone graft looks excellent.

I could feel that since my surgery, even though I hiked to Stewart Falls with Emma on Labor Day, did a hardcore spin class last week, and generally carried on with life, I felt my immune system still straining. I was vegetable-juicing, but all those deadly pleomorphic organisms from those two tooth cavities are now ranging my body, and I FEEL it.

I told Dr. Wall this, and he asked me if I wanted a low-intensity antibiotic. He doesn’t like them, stated that they mess up your GI tract and immunity for TWO YEARS, throwing multiple systems out of balance, but also said, “I also don’t like all those micro-organisms running around inside of you either.”

I said no thanks—I’m doing okay. But I showed  him a swollen lymph node in my neck, just downstream from the removed molars.

He massaged the side of my neck. It hurt. He showed me how to “milk” it—like squeezing thick stuff out of a straw, he said. A few hours later, the swollen painful lymph gland was back to normal, not painful or swollen.

My whole life, if my immune system is taxed, that’s my inherent weakness: lymph glands back up. (Some people, it’s their lungs, or sinuses, or something else, where acidity and infection tends to settle.) Fortunately, lymph glands can be easily manually stimulated.

I met a couple of GSG readers there in the office, who have been going to Dr. Wall since I first blogged about him. (Good luck! It takes weeks, or even a couple of months, to get in! But don’t give up—he is outstanding and moving to a larger office. I want him to train another dentist in his modalities to shorten the wait time.)

I want to promote biological dentistry because I’m SICK that people are putting poison in their mouth every day all around me. They’re cutting the nerve and artery to an ORGAN, and shellacking it in the mouth, and then assuming everything will be just fine. This practice is anything but fine.

I told Dr. Wall he is one of my heroes. He loses popularity with the A.D.A.-loyal dentists, and many other people, in the interests of doing what’s right. I respect that.

Tomorrow, the recipes for an amazing vegan cream of tomato soup, and an out-of-this-world Indian carrot soup with garam masala in it. My survival strategy for the past 2 weeks.

 

Creative Health Institute, part 3 of 5

Here’s a video of Ed and me. He makes a living selling processed food, and he came to CHI because his mom paid for it and told him to go. He had no idea what he was getting himself into. I told him, “That’s because if she told you about the wheat grass implant, you wouldn’t have agreed!” He acknowledged this is likely the reason. That said, he’s glad he did.

I’m always looking for easy preventative nutrition habits that enrich my life and keep me well. I have MANY years of spreading my message, raising my kids, spoiling grand- and great-grandchildren, seeing the world, and tennis, biking, and skiing left to do! My takeaways, from CHI, for my permanent lifestyle so I look and act as young as Madeleine 23 years from now? Two new things:

First, I am going to add Rejuvelac to my habits. My first batch is just finished and sitting on the counter. It’s so easy, extremely inexpensive, and a habit I’ve decided is worth my time. Soak a cup of soft white wheat berries (or quinoa) in water overnight. Rinse and drain it twice a day, covered, for 2 days. Blend it with 8 cups water and let it sit, covered with a tea towel or in a jar with a mesh lid, several days. Then refrigerate it in jars and drink 2 glasses a day. I was a little afraid of it at CHI, but the taste isn’t strong and I acclimated quickly.

Madeleine had a fabulous idea that I use it instead of water in the base of my green smoothies. I might as well—it’ll put probiotics in the smoothie and my kids won’t even notice.

Second, I’m going to start rebounding again. I have a rebounder in my bedroom that I haven’t used in a long time. It’s so incredibly great to move lymph fluids–nothing else really compares. The lymph system is something we take for granted and rarely talk or think about, but if your blood delivers the groceries, the lymph system takes out the garbage. Even a few minutes a day is helpful, and add some lymphatic massage and EFT tapping during that same few minutes.

You’re wondering about this “wheat grass implant” business. It seems foreign at first, and some of the people at my session had NO idea what they were getting themselves into. The three-bag enema cleans anything out of your colon, and then you put 8 oz. of wheat grass into your colon with the enema bag. Best if you can KEEP it in. It is powerfully detoxifying, and it travels that rectal vein very quickly to the liver and cleanses it and opens the ducts for that all-important release of many toxins directly into the colon for elimination. This is a tough one to add to an everyday routine, but a week of wheat-grass juice implants, once a year, is a powerful preventative.

Tomorrow I’ll talk about people I met at CHI and how they’ve impacted my life and studies.

Creative Health Institute, part 2 of 5

Here’s a video of our teacher, Madeleine, talking about Rejuvelac, and a great idea for green smoothies—and the “banya” by the Coldwater Creek that is my favorite part of the CHI experience.

If ALL you got at CHI was any two of the following things, the experience is well worth the money–and of course, you get all five:

1. The education in the form of classes every morning and afternoon, and the chance to learn from Bobby Morgan. (He was unfortunately not there when I was, as his daughter got married; however, I heard 100% good things about his knowledge base, teaching style, and overall nurturing personality.) I had Madeleine instead, and I’m so crazy about her I’m talking to her about co-teaching a retreat next summer. You’ll learn about everything from affirmations, to genetically modified foods, to how to stimulate peristalsis in the colon. I did a guest lecture and so did our scholar-monk (another guest at CHI), Bhante. You’ll get lots of food demos: how to make Rejuvelac (an enzyme-rich probiotic drink from sprouted wheat or quinoa), seed cheese, almond milk, raw treats, sauerkraut, and more.

2. The wheat grass juice. You get three 2-oz. shots a day, 8 oz. to put in your bath every other night, 8 oz. twice a day as an “implant” (I will explain in a minute), wheat grass face masks, and more. While I was there, our lung-cancer patient was given poultices for his chest. Our eye-infection patient put it in her eye. Someone with a foot fungal infection was offered foot baths. If you’ve ever juiced wheat grass, you know it’s highly time consuming, requiring special equipment. You are getting about 30 oz. a day, which would cost you about $60 if you called in an order to your health food store or Jamba Juice! You’ll be treated to a tour of the wheatgrass greenhouse, and they teach you to grow your own.

Their grass tastes sweeter and far better than what I get here in Utah. In fact, despite a 15-year aversion to the stuff (it’s a long story), I did fine taking three shots a day, putting it on my face, and even in my bath. When I got home I got a 4-oz. shot at my health food store, and I gagged at the taste like I usually do—far more bitter and….I don’t know, yucky!

3. Raw-food meals (and Rejuvelac that you drink 16 oz. of daily) made for you. The first three days are raw red-cabbage sauerkraut, and “Energy Soup” (you add flaxseed and kelp or dulse) only. Energy Soup is like green smoothie, only no fruit, and you eat it with a spoon. On Day 4 forward, they offer you salads, sprouts, fruit, and some gourmet raw dishes and even an occasional treat. The chef, B.J., is very solicitous, and you can make a special request if you want. I didn’t, but I saw Chris got blueberries every morning, and other guests’ requests were honored.

4. The social atmosphere. It was amazing how emotional it was to leave the 15 others participating in the Detox and Rebuild program because we’d bonded so much. My detox symptoms consisted of one zit I got that lasted a day. I got up early in the morning and went for my usual run, though much shorter than I do at home, partly to get back in time for the 30 min. rebounding class. But other guests were experiencing headaches, nausea including vomiting, depression, and loss of energy. They usually lasted a day and the next day the guest’s eyes cleared and he or she felt better. But the shared experience–camaraderie, humor, wide diversity of age, health, race, religion, and goals—made the whole experience enjoyable and even fun as well as physically rewarding.

5. The detox protocols. The most important one, IMO, is enemas followed by a wheat-grass implant, and while you do them yourself morning and night, you’re given the equipment and careful instruction and support. This is invaluable, because it’s a lost art in modern culture, and it’s critically important. Coffee enemas or wheat-grass enemas are widely used by the alt-docs I am studying, including Nick Gonzalez, Hippocrates Institute, and the Gerson Therapy.

But another fun amenity at CHI is the “banya” or Russian sauna that Victoria Boutenko and her family built. It was my favorite part of my experience at CHI, getting in there half-naked with Melinda and Ed-and-Ed and whoever else every night. Then I’d leave, plunge into Coldwater Creek 10 steps away, and go back to the banya for more sweat-lodge therapy. Hot-and-cold practices like this are health practices followed by many around the world. You can get a professional colonic or massage or reflexology session at CHI as well (not included, but affordable). You do skin brushing and use the Chi machine. You do a bentonite-clay-and-wheat-grass mask on your face in the morning. You do yoga and meditation sessions. You participate in a half hour of rebounding, lymphatic massage, and EFT tapping every morning together. You are asked to get in the sun at least 15 minutes, and the grounds are beautiful, on the bank of a creek, so the outdoors will draw you out.