ObamaCare . . . part 3 of 3

Congress has been wringing its hands over the tragedy of millions of uninsured Americans, for years. The question has been, “How can we pay for all the drugs and surgeries and doctor visits of the Baby Boomers?” How indeed. (And we aren’t even thinking, yet, of the soda generation of obese kids–we’ll worry about that later.)

The Boomers are headed into old age, and they are the biggest generation in recent history, and they’re EXPENSIVE. Social Security is teetering on bankruptcy. Americans haven’t exactly been investing and saving well. Who will pay for it?

Wrong question. It’s unanswerable. It is too expensive and doesn’t work anyway.

Here’s a better one. What if we didn’t look to drugs and surgery to save us?

Here’s another. Is our medical care system even capable of solving our health care crisis?

Here’s another. Would it be less expensive to just start eating right? A heavily plant-based, mostly raw, whole-foods diet? Would we actually solve our problems that way, rather than drugging symptoms of the problems caused by lifestyle in the first place?

Would we have higher Gross Domestic Product and start to turn the trade deficit and the national debt around, if we all had more energy, a more positive mood, and a disappearance of our chronic health problems? If we ate close to the source, locally, without chemicals and huge corporations controlling us and our diet and health?

My ex-husband’s co-workers are a prime example. They go into diabetic comas in the bathroom, three of them died the last year we were married, and two health insurance companies dropped them after increasing rates a couple of times a year, because the employees were so expensive and so ill. Several had cancer or serious cardiac problems. Everyone he worked with was overweight or obese. Lunch every day was fast food.

We continue to frantically wring our hands over an unsolvable problem–how to pay for the endless healthcare needs of those who are sabotaging their health with lifestyle choices. To do this is to be hamsters forever running in a little wheel. Getting nowhere.

YOU have power to turn it around. Start with your own life. If you’ve gotten off the Standard American Diet, teach someone else how to do it. That’s how my site got started. A way to go quantum with the information I’d culled from a hundred different sources, to CORRECT MY FAMILY’S HEALTH.

Teach someone what you know today. Teach someone else the next day. A lot of you are already doing it. Let’s make it a groundswell, an uprising, an outright revolution.

When I consulted with my LNP friend this week to interpret my Vitamin D test results (see my blog posting about that experiment last week). She referred to testing and said, “If you get your doctor to order the test, your insurance will pay for it.” I said, “I don’t have a doctor.”

She said, “What?” I really don’t. I don’t go to one. Ever. I went to an OB/GYN when I had my babies, but the youngest is 9. I haven’t ever even been to a naturopath.

I don’t need them. THAT, my friends, is the best way out of the downward-spiralling health care nightmare that so many people around us are in. It’s a whirlwind. You reap what you sow. JUST SAY NO.

Put. Down. The hot dog.

Pick up my 12 Steps manual. Or my book The Green Smoothies Diet. Grab an apple and a handful of almonds for the car ride. The GOOD option, take the manual (with recipes/ingredients) into Whole Foods Market. Or BETTER, buy a share in a local community-supported agriculture co-op. Or BEST, plant a garden on your patio or backyard. Make a green smoothie. A big salad. A lovely pot of vegetarian chili. Some homemade whole-grain sourdough bread.

It’s good food and it can save us from being in the downward spiral of ObamaCare. It’s enabling the sickness of drug layering: one chemical pill causing a problem that requires another chemical pill, and on and on until our seniors must have other family members managing their complicated, outrageously expensive drug schedules. Many of them are swallowing pills all day long, and to what advantage?

Start taking steps, my friends. Start today. The Pelosi-Reid-Obama “solution” starts in 4 years.

Power foods? Really?

I saw a People Magazine article last week about 10 “power foods.” They listed agave, along with the aggressively marketed, uber-expensive acai and goji berries. Now I’m not going to diss  acai and goji, which are certainly high in antioxidants.

But if you’re trying to adhere to a budget, do you really want to pay $10 to $60 a pound for these “power foods” from thousands of miles away from your home, when you can buy oranges and apples for $0.69/lb.? Their antioxidant levels may not be as high, but they’re wonderful foods grown close to home that won’t break the bank, and IF YOU EAT THEM REGULARLY they can be an important part of an aggressive anti-disease and pro-energy healthy diet.

Not too exotic, I know. And if you have lots of discretionary income, great. Eat interesting little berries from mountain ranges all the way across the world. (I do really like goji, though I justify the cost only now and then.)

But meantime, common sense suggests that if you stick to greens, vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, legumes, and whole grains grown near you, you’ll be JUST FINE.

As for agave being a power food, no way.

WHAT?! You offer agave in the group buy and it’s in your recipes, GreenSmoothieGirl! WHAT. ARE. YOU. SAYING!

My friends, it is much preferable than sugar. If you get a reputable brand that certifies it to be raw and organic, you should use it for treats that are alternatives to junk food.

But no concentrated sweetener is a power food–except maybe honey, because of its pollen content and anti-bacterial properties. (Still really high in calories. Use it sparingly.)

Anyway, I rolled my eyes at the People article, so mainstream and dumbed down. But I guess nobody wants to hear that boring old broccoli, or almonds, or raw sweet potatoes, are power foods. Yawn. We want something NEW!

People are always writing me, “What do you think of Dr. X’s heart-disease preventing supplement?” “What do you think of emu oil?”

I haven’t studied every new, well-marketed product out there. But keep in mind that for every drop of something-or-other you can squeeze out of the poor emu, or every new pill full of “natural” stuff, there’s a bunch of people sitting around a boardroom strategizing on how a study they pay for can “prove” that you simply must have it to heal 30 different maladies.

I don’t mean to sound cynical. Try it if it’s in your budget. But now and then I like to pull everybody who might be listening, back to the straight and narrow road. That is, simple, whole, unadulterated plant foods. Those we KNOW will heal us and prevent all the awful things we’d rather not die of. If you’re reading the Emu Oil ad online while eating your second Hostess Ding Dong of the day, an examination of priorities might be in order.

Just my $0.02.

Mark Bittman: western lifestyle causing global warming

http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/view/id/263

 

This is a great speech worth your time, by New York Times food writer Mark Bittman.   Did you know that our massive meat consumption (which has increased per capita 250 percent globally in the past 50 years) contributes to global warming?

 

Bittman discusses the history of food since 1900, and he talks about while the mission of “kindness to animals” is good, it’s a red herring and by no means the biggest issue, since we’re killing 10 billion animals annually, thus leading not only to heart disease, but a serious threat to global survival.   Thirty percent of the earth’s surface is devoted to animal production, and this is expected to double in the next 40 years or fewer, if our dietary habits continue.   And 18 percent of greenhouse gases are directly attributable to livestock production.

 

Processed foods also consume lots of the earth’s resources, with 1 billion cans of Coke consumed DAILY.

 

He says “locavore” is Webster’s word of the year: it refers to people who eat only food grown locally.   (If you live in Alaska, obviously this won’t be as easy as for people in California!)

 

Conservatives, beware: while this speaker/journalist is dead-on with  his facts (reads the same sources GreenSmoothieGirl quotes constantly), he’s the usual “liberal media.”    Of more concern is that  he doesn’t practice  what he preaches.   He doesn’t dare call for people to eat lower on the food chain, since he states multiple times that he eats plenty of meat and plans to continue, but he waters down his message saying that we need to be more “aware.”   Huh?   Aware that we are personally contributing to the profligacy of our generation, but do nothing about it?   If you’re aware meat and dairy is bad for you and consumes far more than your share of the Earth’s resources, why not change?

 

“You eat more plants, you eat less other stuff, you live longer.”

 

–Mark Bittman (a  speaker/writer who needs to lead by example)

tips for eating right inexpensively

Q:   Dear GreenSmoothieGirl, I can’t afford to eat the way you suggest. Any ideas?

A:   Most people base their purchasing decisions on taste, convenience, price, appearance, and shelf life.

Of course, what tastes good is dictated by our addictions, and you know if you read my blog that sugar is the most addictive substance on the planet.   Having to wash fruits and vegetables can’t compete, for convenience.   Organic produce doesn’t always look shiny and pretty.   And produce and most whole foods don’t last long on the shelf.   Nutrition is the loser in most buying criteria and decisions!   (If you don’t believe me,  take a peek at  what’s in virtually all grocery carts next time you’re in the store.)

I do have 11 tips for you to save money (and many more are in 12 Steps to Whole Foods):  

  1. Plan meals ahead of time and keep a shipping list to avoid impulse buying.  Along with your shopping list, keep a list of what constitutes “good” prices, as well as a calculator to take along on shopping trips. 
  2. Quit buying chips, soda, and packaged cookies and candy. Quit buying meat.   Quit buying fast food. These things are costing you more than you may realize.
  3. Instead, buy grains and legumes, which are higher in protein than people expect, inexpensive, and they keep in storage for years.   Try serving grains/legumes most nights a week instead of meat.      
  4. If you have a family, invest in a big freezer.   Put it in the garage.   Buy it used if you need to.
  5. Start learning what things cost, and buy larger quantities (5# or more) of produce, nuts, seeds and grains when they’re in season and on sale.
  6. Freeze on-sale fruits in small bags in the freezer.   Put greens in the freezer for green smoothies, if you can’t use them before they will go bad.   Freeze bulk-purchased nuts and seeds in freezer bags.
  7. Ask around and find the buying co-ops for local produce and health-food items.   Get on email lists for those co-ops.   You don’t have to buy huge bulk amounts for Azure Standard and other co-ops.
  8. Dig a cold-storage hole in the ground against your home, if possible, line it with plastic or wood or straw, and put a wooden lid on top.   Store potatoes, onions, carrots, homemade sauerkraut, nuts, seeds, and oils through the winter.
  9. Grow a garden.   Even if all you have is a patio or tiny backyard, you can grow a surprising amount of produce.   This will give you organic produce, and you can freeze whatever you’re not able to use, for fall and winter months.
  10. If organic produce is really expensive, buy conventional and just wash it well, with a veggie soap.   I use Shaklee Basic H.   A gallon of it lasts me a decade.
  11. Go shopping when you’ve just eaten, not when you’re hungry.   Then planning and intelligence informs your shopping decisions (not cravings and addictions).