Tips for Getting More Greens in Kids’ Diets—besides green smoothies

A number of readers have suggested two ways to get more greens in your kids’ diets:

  1. Green smoothie popsicles
  2. Green smoothie fruit leather (in the dehydrator, on teflex sheets, dry until chewy, and roll)

Of course my other tip (besides green smoothies, obviously) is to make KALE CHIPS, and we have lots of recipes in Step 7 of 12 Steps to Whole Foods. One giant leaf of kale, dehydrated, is a small, yummy “chip” or more accurately a “crisp” that is easy to eat.

(With kale chips, or with fruit leather, always have your kids drink a glass of water with it, so the dried foods don’t “scavenge” needed liquids from the stomach, etc.)

Desiree sent me an Amazon link to this popsicle maker that is perfect to freeze green smoothies for little ones—or anyone who likes frozen treats. If you have more green smoothie than you can drink in 48 hours, this is a good way to preserve it, too.

 

and the oxalate controversy rages on……

We got lots of interesting email in response to my rebuttal to the wildly exaggerated and completely undocumented article posted by one “Sarah, the Healthy Home Economist” that tells people not to drink green smoothies and says they can “devastate” your health.

Heidi, a “low oxalate” blogger / site owner wrote a response. I like to look at all viewpoints and appreciate that she listed lower-oxalate greens for those who wish to concern themselves with this issue. She has eliminated some health problems by carefully reducing oxalates for 20 years. Those include turnip and mustard greens, dino kale, curly kale, romaine, cabbage, and collards.

Hopefully Heidi has been creative to keep lots of greens and raw roods in her diet while controlling for oxalates. If not, we eliminate one compound causing a problem and dozens of other compounds desperately needed and hard to find in other sources.

I disagree with Heidi that it’s a good idea to boil greens, as has been passed around the internet as a solution to the “problem.” George Mateljan surveys the literature well and concludes that this does not significantly reduce oxalates. And of course we know boiling destroys most of the food’s other best properties—enzymes, vitamins, and minerals.

I do not disagree that there are a few people who are not metabolizing greens well, and I absolutely agree that improving gut health is key to reversing many conditions. Greens have many critical properties that other foods do not, and these nutritional benefits are desperately needed by virtually everyone. So I’m very reticent to embrace the idea that we eliminate an entire class of foods—or we nuke them to death—because a few people have degenerative gut issues wherein an “anti-nutrient” becomes indigestible and even harmful.

As counterpoint, if you have become alarmed, you owe it to yourself and your health to read another viewpoint. Author Victoria Boutenko, my friend and companion in green crime, has written this extremely detailed, source-rich article on all the research that oxalates are FRIEND RATHER THAN FOE. I covered the more neutral ground of referencing the macro study that concluded the evidence does not support oxalates being harmful, nor does it support that cooking greens neutralizes that compound.

We had a few comments on facebook or on the blog that someone who drinks green smoothies got kidney stones. I know people who eat some whole foods and got cancer, too. It’s a major logical fallacy to leap to the conclusion that because you eat one healthy thing, that healthy thing is causing a disease. Even if you started green smoothies two weeks before you get a kidney stone, that doesn’t mean anything. Kidney stones take a long time to build up before they release and begin to cause pain—and possibly damage. Although I cannot rule out that a nutritious food played a role in oxalates binding to calcium, I think far more likely culprits for the vast majority are long-term indulgence in soda, salty foods, and animal proteins—and low water consumption. Please read George Mateljan’s meticulous reviews of oxalate research and conclusions, and/or Victoria Boutenko’s report below.

Before you change your diet to eliminate or massively reduce the highest micronutrient foods on the planet from your diet, the foods that are the crux of the primate diet worldwide (we share more than 98% of their DNA), you ought to read this documentation suggesting that greens may actually prevent kidney stones. We already know they prevent many, many other modern health risks.

Read Victoria’s report HERE.

Green Juice: Can It Be Yummy? I’m in Arizona to Find Out!

I’ve just checked into An Oasis of Healing to study what Dr. Thomas Lodi, M.D., does to help people. One of my readers, Inge, read what we’re doing and wrote about how much she loves Dr. Lodi, who has been helping her. She wasn’t the only one of our readers to write telling us they’ve been treated and greatly benefited by Dr. Lodi’s work.

I’ll be filming interviews and treatment there, and I’ll be participating too, myself, in a 5-day juice fast and the treatments that are safe for healthy people.

Inge wrote us that Dr. Lodi does wonderful raw vegan classes at his clinic, and that they have the best-tasting green juice she’s ever had.

I just bought a Norwalk Juicer. I’ve always been curious about it not only because it’s $2,500, and because the alt-cancer docs use it, but also because it’s quite a contraption and the best juicer available. I’ll do a video soon. It grinds the plants, then presses them in a second step. You get about 50% more juice from a Norwalk than the others (Champion, Omega, Jack LaLanne, etc.) and there is no damage to the plant or heat involved.

I discovered this week a huge patch of collard greens in my garden that somehow escaped use all summer. What to do with it all?! I made two quarts of collard juice, and added some of the yummy apples from my tree, and organic carrots. It was……not super good.

I drank it all, but it took me three days and I felt a little nauseous every time I thought about it. So I was curious about the yummy green juice Inge told us about. So Clothilde in Dr. Lodi’s office gave me this recipe. Apple, lemon, and ginger seem to be what cut the “green” taste:

An Oasis of Healing’s Green Juice Recipe

Yields approximately 2 quarts of juice

Use only organic ingredients

10 stalks of Celery

1 to 2 Cucumbers (peeled if waxed)

2       bunches Kale

2       bunches Spinach

2       bunches Dandelion

1       Granny Smith Apple (Optional)

½     stalk Broccoli

1       Lemon (peel the yellow rind, being careful to leave as much white pith on the lemon as possible

¼ ” Ring of fresh Ginger Root, peeled

7 to 10 stalks of Parsley (Add last, after all the other ingredients have been juiced, because it tends to bind in the juicer)

This recipe makes approximately 2 quarts of juice depending on the freshness, ripeness and water content of the vegetables. Cut recipe in half to yield 1 quart.

Taste and adjust ingredients to your liking.

Tips for success:

  • Strain fresh prepared juice to increase absorption and benefit to the body.
  • Store juice in glass jars with rubber seal.   Fill jar as full as possible, as extra air trapped in the bottle destroys nutrients.
  • The highest nutritional value is within the first 45 minutes after making the juice.   This is not always feasible; however, do not make your juice the night before.   At a minimum, make your juice each morning and evening.

Buy enough vegetables for a week’s worth of juices:

  • When you bring the vegetables home, wash immediately and dry thoroughly. Cut off root end of spinach and celery to separate, rinse thoroughly with water to remove all dirt.
  • Use salad spinner to dry spinach, dandelion, and kale.   Place all other vegetables on towels to air dry thoroughly.
  • Buy green stay fresh bags for vegetables.   Portion the vegetables out according to the number of juices you will make.   (i.e. Enough veges. for 1 qt of juice per day for a week, then portion & pack veggies in 7 bags)   Pack green veggies only NOT including cucumbers.   Cucumbers, lemons, apples, and ginger are prepared at time of juicing.   If using paper towel to dry and store veggies use chlorine free variety.

Dill Pickle Kale Chips

Kale chips are the best thing that dehydrators do, in my opinion. (Well, making crunchy snacks out of sprouted raw almonds is a close second, and flax crackers are a close third.) I’m sitting here eating some kale chips at my desk, right now.

Not only are they delicious and easy to make, but you get a GIANT leaf of kale, with its nutrition nearly intact, in just a few crispy, yummy bites. I have some good kale-chip recipes in Ch. 7 of 12 Steps to Whole Foods, where I teach you all about sprouting and dehydrating.

My kids sometimes eat an entire dehydrator full of kale chips in one day.

Here’s a recipe I developed this week, to deal with the huge crop of kale in my garden right now. (I love this time of year, and I dread that first frost when all the garden abundance ends! It’s okay, though, because my freezer is crammed full of greens, fruit, seeds, nuts, and grains.)

DILL PICKLE KALE CHIPS

¼ cup chopped onion

2 cloves garlic

1 1/2 Tbsp raw apple cider vinegar

1/2 tsp Original Crystal Himalayan Salt

1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

2 Tbsp. dried dill

1 C cashews

1 Tbsp. lemon juice

16 kale leaves

Blend first 8 ingredients in high-speed blender, adding a minimum of water to make it blend.  Pour into a shallow bowl and dip one side of kale leaves into mixture. Dehydrate kale chips, dipped side up, until dry and crispy, below 115 degrees in dehydrator. Do not seal in Ziploc bags or Tupperware, or they lose their crispiness. I leave them in the dehydrator racks or put them on a plate until they’re gone.

benifits of flax seed

Yesterday I wrote about the benifits of flax seed.   (I misspelled that word on purpose—long story.)   Possibly the very best way to get Essential Fatty Acids is in the form of flax and/or its oil.   However, two cautions are in order.   First, smell the seeds when you purchase them (and look at the expiration date to make sure that they are fresh).   You can usually tell if they smell rancid.   Grind them in your BlendTec right before using them, as they oxidize quickly and have a shelf life of only a few months.   Second, whole flax seeds pass through the intestine doing little other than absorbing liquid, if they aren’t broken down.   So chew flax very well if you eat it whole, or grind it instead.  

You can get your EFAs easily from high-quality flax oil, which must be purchased refrigerated in dark bottles at health food stores.   Barlean’s and Udo’s are excellent brands that use organic flax and refrigerate it from production to point of sale.   One tablespoon of flax oil daily provides an adequate quantity of EFAs with the ideal Omega 3:6 ratio.   Including the whole seed in your diet, as well, will be less expensive and will add dietary fiber.   We will focus on flax seeds again in Ch. 7 of 12 Steps to Whole Foods.

 In addition to flax, foods rich in Omega-3 fatty acids also include walnuts, pumpkin or sesame seeds, avocados, and leafy greens like kale, spinach, and collards.   Eating these foods may be even better than eating the oil, because their nutrition will be utilized by the body throughout the day.   I also like hempseed protein powder, which I add to virtually any breakfast (12 Steps to Whole Foods, Ch. 10, or the new recipe collection in my store).   Uses for pumpkin and sesame seeds are found in several chapters of 12 Steps and several of the recipe collections.

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