Green Juice: Can It Be Yummy? I’m in Arizona to Find Out!

I’ve just checked into An Oasis of Healing to study what Dr. Thomas Lodi, M.D., does to help people. One of my readers, Inge, read what we’re doing and wrote about how much she loves Dr. Lodi, who has been helping her. She wasn’t the only one of our readers to write telling us they’ve been treated and greatly benefited by Dr. Lodi’s work.

I’ll be filming interviews and treatment there, and I’ll be participating too, myself, in a 5-day juice fast and the treatments that are safe for healthy people.

Inge wrote us that Dr. Lodi does wonderful raw vegan classes at his clinic, and that they have the best-tasting green juice she’s ever had.

I just bought a Norwalk Juicer. I’ve always been curious about it not only because it’s $2,500, and because the alt-cancer docs use it, but also because it’s quite a contraption and the best juicer available. I’ll do a video soon. It grinds the plants, then presses them in a second step. You get about 50% more juice from a Norwalk than the others (Champion, Omega, Jack LaLanne, etc.) and there is no damage to the plant or heat involved.

I discovered this week a huge patch of collard greens in my garden that somehow escaped use all summer. What to do with it all?! I made two quarts of collard juice, and added some of the yummy apples from my tree, and organic carrots. It was……not super good.

I drank it all, but it took me three days and I felt a little nauseous every time I thought about it. So I was curious about the yummy green juice Inge told us about. So Clothilde in Dr. Lodi’s office gave me this recipe. Apple, lemon, and ginger seem to be what cut the “green” taste:

An Oasis of Healing’s Green Juice Recipe

Yields approximately 2 quarts of juice

Use only organic ingredients

10 stalks of Celery

1 to 2 Cucumbers (peeled if waxed)

2       bunches Kale

2       bunches Spinach

2       bunches Dandelion

1       Granny Smith Apple (Optional)

½     stalk Broccoli

1       Lemon (peel the yellow rind, being careful to leave as much white pith on the lemon as possible

¼ ” Ring of fresh Ginger Root, peeled

7 to 10 stalks of Parsley (Add last, after all the other ingredients have been juiced, because it tends to bind in the juicer)

This recipe makes approximately 2 quarts of juice depending on the freshness, ripeness and water content of the vegetables. Cut recipe in half to yield 1 quart.

Taste and adjust ingredients to your liking.

Tips for success:

  • Strain fresh prepared juice to increase absorption and benefit to the body.
  • Store juice in glass jars with rubber seal.   Fill jar as full as possible, as extra air trapped in the bottle destroys nutrients.
  • The highest nutritional value is within the first 45 minutes after making the juice.   This is not always feasible; however, do not make your juice the night before.   At a minimum, make your juice each morning and evening.

Buy enough vegetables for a week’s worth of juices:

  • When you bring the vegetables home, wash immediately and dry thoroughly. Cut off root end of spinach and celery to separate, rinse thoroughly with water to remove all dirt.
  • Use salad spinner to dry spinach, dandelion, and kale.   Place all other vegetables on towels to air dry thoroughly.
  • Buy green stay fresh bags for vegetables.   Portion the vegetables out according to the number of juices you will make.   (i.e. Enough veges. for 1 qt of juice per day for a week, then portion & pack veggies in 7 bags)   Pack green veggies only NOT including cucumbers.   Cucumbers, lemons, apples, and ginger are prepared at time of juicing.   If using paper towel to dry and store veggies use chlorine free variety.

recipes to use your raw almonds

Those of you who subscribe to 12 Steps to Whole Foods (http://www.greensmoothiegirl.com/12-steps-to-whole-food-eating.html) have recipes to use raw, germinated  almonds in Ch. 7 and will have more in Ch. 11.   But here are two more recipes for you:

SPROUTED ALMOND PATE (WRAP FILLING)

2 cups almonds, soaked overnight and drained

3 carrots

handful of fresh basil, chopped

1 small yellow squash, diced

1 small yellow onion, diced

2 tsp. sea salt

2 tsp. kelp granules

Put almonds and carrots through the Champion Juicer with the blank (homogenizing) plate on.Stir in other ingredients well.Serve a generous portion in a sprouted-wheat tortilla with cucumber spears (and optionally, any homemade dressing from Ch. 3 of 12 Steps to Whole Foods).You can send this to school or work by rolling the wrap up tightly in plastic wrap.

SPROUTED CURRY ALMONDS

4 cups raw almonds, soaked overnight and drained

1 Tbsp. red curry

1/3 cup water

2 tsp. Original Himalayan Crystal Salt (or sea salt)

2 tsp. agave

1 tsp. kelp granules

1 tsp. cayenne

Dehydrate soaked and drained almonds for several hours until mostly dry.Blend remaining ingredients in a bowl, and stir almonds in well, allowing to sit for a while to absorb liquid.Dehydrate below 116 degrees until dry and crunchy.Keep in fridge if almonds will last you more than a week.

blending vs. juicing

I’ve had three people email me the past week to ask why you’d blend smoothies, rather than juice your fruits and vegetables.   So here’s why, for anyone else wondering.

First, on a practical level, if you’ve ever operated a juicer, you know what a mess the cleanup is.   Even those of us quite dedicated to our family’s health usually throw in the towel after a while.   Most of us “health fanatics” (myself included) have a Champion juicer collecting dust on the shelf.   It does come in handy for making almond butter, though.

Second, while juicing got us lots of antioxidants, vitamins and minerals, a glass of carrot juice is still the sugar of 6-8 carrots . . . but without all the great insoluble fiber that slows down  that sugar’s  impact  on the bloodstream.   (Studies show that even high-sugar fruits don’t lead to diabetes or blood sugar imbalances, largely because of the fiber and other elements in the whole food.)   With juicing, you’re throwing away all that fiber that your body needs for absorbing toxins, moving food and waste through the digestive system,  improving peristalsis, preventing colon cancer, and more.

With blended green smoothies, you’re eating  ALL the fiber that the old method of juicing threw away—and your food is broken down, partly predigested.   That’s why I call juicing “so 80’s.”   Drinking vegetable juice is great.   It helped my grandmother eliminate her deadly cancer—after all, they didn’t have BlendTecs back then.   (She also turned orange from consuming so much beta carotene!)   But the turbo blender we  can have in our kitchen now is a HUGE improvement in getting raw, whole plant foods in our diet.   Check out my “best blender” page for six reasons why I like BlendTec even better than its main competitor, VitaMix.