The most delicious carrot soup, you’ve gotta try this!

Here’s another fabulous garden recipe that is helping me thrive on my mostly-liquid diet. You will LOVE it, and it’s all raw! Thank you to Patty, who made it for me. I met her at CHI in Michigan a year ago, and brought her out to work for us full-time. I am so thankful, since I was killing myself with overwork, and my kids adore her and think she is the Raw Mary Poppins. It was hard to do, and it’s hard to admit, since I did EVERYTHING myself, from scratch, for 20 years. But because of my work schedule, I needed help. I’m telling you because you’ll see her all over my blog, I’m sure. I’ll share lots of recipes we’re developing.

Patty’s a Level III Raw Chef, which means not only is she very accomplished, but also, she can certify Level I and II. We just decided she’ll be teaching certification classes to locals around the first of the year, in my home. Get excited, because this girl can COOK! Or “arrange the elements,” as we like to say in the “raw” world!

Simply Elegant Raw Indian Carrot Coconut Soup

Ingredients:

  • One young Thai coconut
  • 3 cups Carrot Pulp (I save it from juicing — or you can shred carrots in your food processor or blend carrots with coconut liquid to make a pulp)
  • The juice of one lemon
  • The juice of one tangerine
  • 1 teaspoon Himalayan Sea Salt
  • 1 Tablespoon garam masala (Indian seasoning)
  • 3 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 cups fresh almond milk
  • 1/2  inch ginger
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 4 Tablespoons coconut nectar
  • Cayenne pepper to taste

Directions:

  • Crack the coconut and pour the coconut water in your high-speed blender. (Or use 1 ½ cups canned coconut water.)
  • Scoop the coconut meat and add it to the blender.
  • Juice lemon and tangerine in a citrus juicer and add to blender.
  • Add all other ingredients — except cayenne.
  • Blend until smooth.
  • Pour into bowl and dehydrate at 110 for three hours.
  • Ladle servings into a bowl and sprinkle cayenne pepper on top to suit your taste. (I like about 1/2 a teaspoon per bowl but that’s VERY hot!)

Green Juice: Can It Be Yummy? I’m in Arizona to Find Out!

I’ve just checked into An Oasis of Healing to study what Dr. Thomas Lodi, M.D., does to help people. One of my readers, Inge, read what we’re doing and wrote about how much she loves Dr. Lodi, who has been helping her. She wasn’t the only one of our readers to write telling us they’ve been treated and greatly benefited by Dr. Lodi’s work.

I’ll be filming interviews and treatment there, and I’ll be participating too, myself, in a 5-day juice fast and the treatments that are safe for healthy people.

Inge wrote us that Dr. Lodi does wonderful raw vegan classes at his clinic, and that they have the best-tasting green juice she’s ever had.

I just bought a Norwalk Juicer. I’ve always been curious about it not only because it’s $2,500, and because the alt-cancer docs use it, but also because it’s quite a contraption and the best juicer available. I’ll do a video soon. It grinds the plants, then presses them in a second step. You get about 50% more juice from a Norwalk than the others (Champion, Omega, Jack LaLanne, etc.) and there is no damage to the plant or heat involved.

I discovered this week a huge patch of collard greens in my garden that somehow escaped use all summer. What to do with it all?! I made two quarts of collard juice, and added some of the yummy apples from my tree, and organic carrots. It was……not super good.

I drank it all, but it took me three days and I felt a little nauseous every time I thought about it. So I was curious about the yummy green juice Inge told us about. So Clothilde in Dr. Lodi’s office gave me this recipe. Apple, lemon, and ginger seem to be what cut the “green” taste:

An Oasis of Healing’s Green Juice Recipe

Yields approximately 2 quarts of juice

Use only organic ingredients

10 stalks of Celery

1 to 2 Cucumbers (peeled if waxed)

2       bunches Kale

2       bunches Spinach

2       bunches Dandelion

1       Granny Smith Apple (Optional)

½     stalk Broccoli

1       Lemon (peel the yellow rind, being careful to leave as much white pith on the lemon as possible

¼ ” Ring of fresh Ginger Root, peeled

7 to 10 stalks of Parsley (Add last, after all the other ingredients have been juiced, because it tends to bind in the juicer)

This recipe makes approximately 2 quarts of juice depending on the freshness, ripeness and water content of the vegetables. Cut recipe in half to yield 1 quart.

Taste and adjust ingredients to your liking.

Tips for success:

  • Strain fresh prepared juice to increase absorption and benefit to the body.
  • Store juice in glass jars with rubber seal.   Fill jar as full as possible, as extra air trapped in the bottle destroys nutrients.
  • The highest nutritional value is within the first 45 minutes after making the juice.   This is not always feasible; however, do not make your juice the night before.   At a minimum, make your juice each morning and evening.

Buy enough vegetables for a week’s worth of juices:

  • When you bring the vegetables home, wash immediately and dry thoroughly. Cut off root end of spinach and celery to separate, rinse thoroughly with water to remove all dirt.
  • Use salad spinner to dry spinach, dandelion, and kale.   Place all other vegetables on towels to air dry thoroughly.
  • Buy green stay fresh bags for vegetables.   Portion the vegetables out according to the number of juices you will make.   (i.e. Enough veges. for 1 qt of juice per day for a week, then portion & pack veggies in 7 bags)   Pack green veggies only NOT including cucumbers.   Cucumbers, lemons, apples, and ginger are prepared at time of juicing.   If using paper towel to dry and store veggies use chlorine free variety.

Broken ribs, Thai Lettuce Wraps

Day 4. It turns out I have a couple of broken ribs. Good times! Ice and heat, ice and heat, and this morning seems a bit better than the past few days. But I am going to Boise and Twin Falls anyway, in 2 days!

One more recipe from Michelle’s garden to deal with the lettuce onslaught, one of my favorite things, Thai Lettuce Wraps:

Thai Lettuce Wraps

1 head lettuce – any kind, but a firmer leaf works better

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 thumb size piece of ginger, grated

1 red chili de-seeded and finely sliced (you can leave this out if you want it mild)

2 shallots, finely sliced

1 C firm tofu, chopped into small squares

1 carrot, grated

1 egg white, organic, free range

1/2 C shredded red cabbage

3 green onions

2 C larger sprouts (bean, sunflower)

3  T lime juice

2 T Nama Shoyu

2 T fish sauce (or more Nama Shoyu – but the fish sauce does make this taste really good!)

1 T agave

2 T olive oil

Put 1 T. oil into wok or large frying pan.   Stir-fry garlic, ginger, chili and shallot for one minute over medium high heat.   Add tofu, carrot, cabbage and green onions and the other T olive oil.   Stir-fry for one more minute.   Add lime juice, Nama Shoyu, fish sauce and agave while stir-frying.   Push ingredients to the side and add the egg white.   Mix in with other ingredients.   Add sprouts, stir and remove from heat.   Taste and add fish sauce or salt if needed.

Serve in lettuce leaves and eat by hand.

Raw food weight loss

Raw food promotes weight loss in people who need to lose, and weight gain in people who are severely underweight from malnourishment.   Remember that unless you’re being excessive with nuts and seeds, raw food inherently is lower in fat and starch, which are what lead to weight gain.

To lose weight, following are a few ideas.   Put celery in your green smoothie.   It takes more calories to eat a stalk than you actually GET from it, so it’s bulk, to clean you out, bulk to fill you up, and great nutrition that actually nourishes the thyroid, which regulates metabolism.

Use cayenne, garlic, ginger, and cinnamon, too, to stimulate metabolism as you eat delicious raw food toward weight loss.   And don’t forget lemon juice in your water–it’s a great natural diuretic.

I got this great message on facebook recently from a Canadian reader named Karen.   She said she found GSG.com when googling 12 Steps for a friend in Alcoholic’s Anonymous!   As random as that seems, she called finding GSG “fate.”   She’s made some very significant dietary changes based on what she’s learned thus far, and has lost over 20 pounds.   She wondered if drinking a pint of green smoothie a day is enough.

Answer:   It’s enough for a wonderful first step!   Your body, mind, and spirit will tell you when it’s not enough any more, so listen to those cues and don’t stop your progress now.   My guess is you’ll want more sooner, rather than later.   Boutenko’s Roseburg study asked participants if they wanted to continue with their quart of green smoothie daily, and the vast majority said they wanted MORE, if anything.   I often drink THREE pints a day, though a quart is my average.

raw food: here’s what’s in my dehydrator right now

You know I love my dehydrator, especially this time of year when I’ve got so much stuff coming out of the garden that I don’t want to go to waste. Right now I have all 9 trays full in my dehydrator with two recipes contributed by readers. (I love y’all! Thanks for your ideas and support of each other!)

Tonya’s cheesy kale chips are filling four trays and they are INCREDIBLE, hard to believe how much nutrition you’re getting just snacking. I just took them out and ate a bunch of them while I wrote this. Just press one side of your leaves of kale in the “sauce.” Doubling the recipe will fill your 9 trays.

Here’s my recommendation on the site, if you don’t have a dehydrator yet and want more info (plus one of my recipes for flax crackers): http://www.greensmoothiegirl.com/robyn-recommendations/dehydrators/

Tara C. gives this tip for using those baseball-bat sized zucchinis in the garden and I’ve got 4 trays of zucchini moons almost dry–just tried one, and I like them. Super easy

! Silly Dilly Zucchini Moons

Slice zucchini in half length-wise.

Scoop out inner core of seeds.

Turn over and slice thinly (about 3/8-inch thick).

Spread on dehydrator trays and sprinkle with dill. Dehydrate until crispy.

Enjoy plain or with a yummy, dilly dip.

Now that I’ve removed the kale chips, I’m going to use up the big boxful of cherry tomatoes my son hauled in yesterday, with this idea also from Tara C.:

Cheery Cherry Pizza Snacks

(My kids say these taste like mini-pizzas.)

Slice cherry tomatoes in half, toss with pizza seasoning (I get it from Azure Standard) and dry till crisp. Enjoy!

(Tara would like suggestions to improve on this idea.)

Here’s Tara’s last idea, which I’ll try next:

Gingered Zucchini Bites

Slice zucchini as above. Before dehydrating, soak for 30-60 minutes in pineapple juice mixed with 3 tablespoons grated fresh ginger, 1/2 cup agave, and a dash of cinnamon. Dry in dehydrator until crispy. These look lovely in your pantry stored in Mason jars with a little raffia tied on top–pretty enough to give away!

This morning at 5:30 a.m., I made some pesto from the basil, spinach, and tomatoes in my garden. See your Jump-Start collection on the site for that recipe–whole-grain pasta with pesto is one of my kids’ favorites. Then I made a variation on that, some zucchini pesto with barely steamed zucchini, basil, kelp, cayenne, walnuts, sea salt, olive oil, mustard seed, and Bragg’s. I put these two types of pesto in pint jars, labelled them, and froze them. I think I’ll share a pint with a few friends this weekend.

swine flu prevention: should you worry?

I hope you aren’t worried about the swine flu.   Like you, I’ve been reading all about it.   I am simply not worried.   Not because I don’t understand the risk, but because by following a few simple practices, you minimize your risk, and the rest is in God’s hands anyway, where we would do well to leave the remainder.   “Do your best and forget the rest,” as Tony says in P90X, the extreme workout regimen I started this week.   Or, as an embroidery sampler said that my mother did, hanging on her wall as I was growing up, “God grant me the wisdom to change the things I can and accept the things I cannot.”

All that written, I got the devastating news last night that my beautiful 36-year old cousin I grew up with, who had no known health problems and was a normal weight, has passed away on the way to the hospital of cardiac arrest after contracting the flu.   (Swine flu is not suspected.)   My extended family is reeling and we are praying for her young family that includes three little boys.

I don’t think the answers lie in extreme precautions, running out and buying gas masks and paraphernalia.   Experts I have read say that the little germ masks won’t do us a bit of good against the swine flu.   Washing your hands well, not touching doorknobs and other things in public, and staying out of crowds is common sense wisdom.

Adding to your food storage some power foods and natural remedies against illness is wise.   Vitamin C, colloidal silver, oregano, garlic, sproutable seeds/nuts/grains, spirulina, cacao, goji berries, cayenne, aloe vera, and ginger.

Drink lots of water (half your weight in ounces), jump on a rebounder, get enough sleep, and get out in the sun at least 15 minutes daily for your Vitamin D–these four things are paramount to keep your immune system supported and lymph fluids moving and draining.   Minimize stress and maximize love in your life.   Don’t exhaust your adrenal glands with eating sugar, and nourish all the organs of your body with whole plant foods, mostly raw.

Thinking that because we’re healthy and have nourished our immune system should give us lots more confidence, but of course it was the healthy/young in the population who died en masse in the flu epidemic of 1918.   (Usually those with strong immune systems do well, and I see no evidence to the contrary so far with the swine flu.)   So observing the simple precautionary behaviors mentioned above would be wise as well.

Indulging in fear and panic is not wise, and it’s paralytic and unhelpful anyway.  My prediction is that this is not going to be a massive pandemic; it will go away soon, though we may have a Round 2 in the fall.   Most who get the swine flu will find that it’s no worse than the usual influenzas that some people contract in the winter.

If I’m right, that will give you some time to focus on preparedness, including a three-month supply of food so you could stay home if you needed to.