a recipe for you for Indian Dahl

This is something I like for dinner, and you can make it yellow or green depending on whether you use green split peas or yellow lentils.  It’s quick and easy to make.  I usually rinse the peas and rice and then soak overnight, then simmer them in two saucepans the next morning to eat that night.  It has both a grain and a legume–a “perfect protein.”  I explain why, in Ch. 6, you don’t need to worry about that like vegetarians did in the 1980’s and some still do.  (If you have OLD vegetarian cookbooks, you can see lots of obsessing about this.)  In a nutshell, your body has amino acids in a free-floating pool to draw upon for 24 hours, so you don’t have to put them all together in any given meal, for your body to assemble protein.  That said, some people feel that having grains/legumes together makes a more filling meal.

Enjoy!

Indian Green or Yellow Dahl

2 cups split peas or yellow lentils

1 1/2 cups brown rice

water

6 cloves garlic

1 tsp. ground coriander

2 tsp. kelp granules (optional)

1 tsp. salt (for rice)

1 1/2 tsp. sea salt (for peas/lentils)

1 tsp. red pepper flakes

1 tsp. turmeric

2 tsp. cumin

1 cup chopped cilantro

In separate saucepans, rinse split peas and brown rice well.  Cover each with fresh water and allow to soak several hours.  Drain well.  Add 3 cups water and 1 tsp. salt to the rice, and 4 cups water to the split peas, bring each to a boil, and reduce heat for 45 mins.  Add all seasonings except cilantro to peas/lentils, and mash with a spoon.  Serve dahl over brown rice and sprinkle liberally with cilantro.

swine flu prevention: should you worry?

I hope you aren’t worried about the swine flu.   Like you, I’ve been reading all about it.   I am simply not worried.   Not because I don’t understand the risk, but because by following a few simple practices, you minimize your risk, and the rest is in God’s hands anyway, where we would do well to leave the remainder.   “Do your best and forget the rest,” as Tony says in P90X, the extreme workout regimen I started this week.   Or, as an embroidery sampler said that my mother did, hanging on her wall as I was growing up, “God grant me the wisdom to change the things I can and accept the things I cannot.”

All that written, I got the devastating news last night that my beautiful 36-year old cousin I grew up with, who had no known health problems and was a normal weight, has passed away on the way to the hospital of cardiac arrest after contracting the flu.   (Swine flu is not suspected.)   My extended family is reeling and we are praying for her young family that includes three little boys.

I don’t think the answers lie in extreme precautions, running out and buying gas masks and paraphernalia.   Experts I have read say that the little germ masks won’t do us a bit of good against the swine flu.   Washing your hands well, not touching doorknobs and other things in public, and staying out of crowds is common sense wisdom.

Adding to your food storage some power foods and natural remedies against illness is wise.   Vitamin C, colloidal silver, oregano, garlic, sproutable seeds/nuts/grains, spirulina, cacao, goji berries, cayenne, aloe vera, and ginger.

Drink lots of water (half your weight in ounces), jump on a rebounder, get enough sleep, and get out in the sun at least 15 minutes daily for your Vitamin D–these four things are paramount to keep your immune system supported and lymph fluids moving and draining.   Minimize stress and maximize love in your life.   Don’t exhaust your adrenal glands with eating sugar, and nourish all the organs of your body with whole plant foods, mostly raw.

Thinking that because we’re healthy and have nourished our immune system should give us lots more confidence, but of course it was the healthy/young in the population who died en masse in the flu epidemic of 1918.   (Usually those with strong immune systems do well, and I see no evidence to the contrary so far with the swine flu.)   So observing the simple precautionary behaviors mentioned above would be wise as well.

Indulging in fear and panic is not wise, and it’s paralytic and unhelpful anyway.  My prediction is that this is not going to be a massive pandemic; it will go away soon, though we may have a Round 2 in the fall.   Most who get the swine flu will find that it’s no worse than the usual influenzas that some people contract in the winter.

If I’m right, that will give you some time to focus on preparedness, including a three-month supply of food so you could stay home if you needed to.

 

easy kale or collard “chips” you can make in your dehydrator

GreenSmoothieGirl.com reader Tonya C. donated  a recipe for yummy “chips” (I call them “crisps” because they’re really light and airy) made in the dehydrator. I have significantly  altered the recipe. Brewer’s Yeast is a good way for vegans to obtain Vitamin B12.

Cheesy Kale/Collard  Crisps

  • 1/3 cup cashews, soaked 1-2 hours (optionally)
  • 2 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 3 Tbsp. water
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/2  tsp. Original Himalayan Crystal Salt
  • ¼ cup nutritional (or Brewer’s) yeast
  • 2 green onions (including the green part)
  • ½ tsp. chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp.  cayenne
  • 1/4 tsp.  turmeric
  • 1  clove garlic

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Blend all ingredients well in Total Blender. Press one side of 20-30 small kale or collard leaves (stems removed) in mixture and dry them for 4-6 hours in Excalibur dehydrator (until crispy).

Here’s a hilarious video of Tonya’s adorable 2-year old Emily making and eating the chips that her family calls “Emily’s Cheetohs.” They were disappearing during the night because Emily would wake up and wander into the kitchen to eat them:

http://raw100.ning.com/video/video/show?id=2170300%3AVideo%3A228864&xgs=1

Enjoy!

p.s. If you’ve been wanting an Excalibur dehydrator, here’s a link to another blog entry with another cracker recipe I really like, and a link to get a dehydrator.

another sprouted-almond recipe

This spicy variation on my sprouted, flavored  raw almond recipes for you comes from GreenSmoothieGirl.com reader Steve (and I wrote you back to say thanks, Steve, but emails always bounce back from you):

Spicy Almonds

10 cups raw almonds, soaked overnight and dehydrated at 105 degrees approx. 6 hours

½ cup dates

2 Tbs Himalayan Crystal Salt

2 Tbs agave

3 cloves garlic

2 tsp cayenne

3 habanero peppers

1 pasilla pepper

1 lime without skin

Enough water to blend

Blend all ingredients except almonds in BlendTec on high until smooth. Pour into a

bowl, add almonds and stir well. Let mixture sit for an hour to allow nuts to absorb

liquid, and then stir again. Spread nuts on teflex sheets in dehydrator. Dry at 105

degrees for about 16 hours. Place nuts on mesh sheets and dry again until crunchy

(about 10 hours).

Dehydrator Recipe . . . part 3 of 3

Sprouting (and dehydrating) is very frankly the most sophisticated nutrition principle I teach. For newbies, I start with lower level things: getting more fruits and vegetables in the diet, and eating whole grains, for instance. Most Americans are not prepared for the idea of sprouting and live foods. Some of my readers are so ambitious that they go ALL OUT and within weeks of leaving a processed diet, they’re already sprouting.

Others of you have been doing the first few steps in 12 Steps to Whole Foods. . . and you feel you’re in strange territory, but you’re ready to try.

If that’s you, ask for an Excalibur 3000 series dehydrator for Christmas to start making live snack foods from Chapter 7 (or the Crunchy Snacks recipe collection).

Here’s one of my favorite recipes for using the dehydrator to get get LIVE flaxseed in the diet. These crackers are easy to make, yummy, and filling.Remember with dehydrated foods to always drink water with them. (Otherwise they aggressively soak up all the liquids in your digestive tract, like stomach acids.)

Flax-Veggie crackers

  • Soak in 4 cups water for several hours:
  • 3 cups flax seeds (1/2 brown, ½ golden)
  • 1 cup raw sunflower seeds
  • Shred in food processor, or very finely dice
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 2 carrots
  • Puree in Blend Tec:
  • 4 tomatoes
  • 2 stalks celery
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1/3 cup nama shoyu
  • 1 tsp. sea salt
  • 1 Tbsp. chili powder

Mix all all three mixtures together well, by hand, and spread on plastic dehydrator sheets, about ¼” thick.Cut into cracker shapes and dehydrate at 105 degrees until crackers are dry on top, about 24 hours.Turn over, take off teflex sheets, and finish drying until crackers are crispy.

Tip: We like to eat these plain, but we also often put slices of avocado on top.

natural remedies for ear infections

I just met this cute blonde mom named Mary Jane, who was telling my friend about her little boy’s chronic ear infection that multiple courses of antibiotics just can’t eliminate.   She was saying that her son’s “cold” just keeps going—six weeks now of constant, thick mucous.

I sometimes just can’t believe that no pediatrician will do ANYTHING for an ear infection besides nuke it with antibiotics.   Limiting your practice to systemic drugs that hurt more than help . . . well, I guess you’d be a pariah in the community of M.D.s if you did anything different.   Oh, and also insurance companies wouldn’t pay.   (Minor detail, how could I forget?)

And yet their own medical journals are clear that more than 80 percent of ear infections are viral.   Therefore, more than 4 times out of 5, antibiotics won’t do a bit of good.   But they don’t have a clue if it’s that 1 in 5, so they give you an antibiotic because . . . well, that’s all they know how to do.

(I’m not trying to be mean.   I used to ask pediatricians point-blank: “Do you have any way to help me besides an antibiotic prescription?” and the answer is simply, NO.)

And even if it was a bacterial infection that isn’t antibiotic-resistant, with just one dose, you’ve wiped out ALL the healthy flora in the entire gastrointestinal tract.   That’s what was standing between your little one and the NEXT infection.   So now the little guy is down for the count, just waiting for the next bug to come along when he has no resistance.

I administered my last course of antibiotics well over a decade ago.   Moving on to natural treatments that work WITH instead of AGAINST the body has been so liberating that I just want to tell perfect strangers about it!

#1: Eliminate dairy products and refined sugar/flour.   (That all by itself might be enough to say goodbye to infections forever.)

#2:   Use warmed garlic/mullein drops in the ear (in an olive oil base) that you can get at a health food store.

#3:   Colloidal silver: use as directed for a week or two.

#4: See if you can get that kid to drink LOTS of water!

#5: If you’re frustrated reading this because you’ve already done the antibiotics and are in Mary Jane’s position, all is not lost.   Give your child good, homemade kefir or yogurt (in my recipes) every day—no sugar added, please—and you can rebuild a healthy colony of good bacteria in about 30 days.

#6: If you do want to use medical treatment, I actually believe that the simple ear-tube surgery (no general anaesthesia, 15 min. procedure) is much less invasive and harmful than ONE round of antibiotics.   And it’s actually very effective for most children, although you should keep their heads out of the water, which is hard if your kids like to swim or take baths.