Antibiotics and dental surgery….do I agree with taking AB’s preventatively? Part 2 of 2

Answer:

Dr. Larson, I have always appreciated how conscientious you are in your practice, and in your ongoing study to legitimately find the truth. And I think it’s impressive that you stay open minded….plenty of docs wouldn’t even ask me what I think. Like I once did, they trust only peer-reviewed-journal-published clinical trials. Of course, the drug industry INVENTED the clinical trial, which hasn’t ever been tested.

There’s plenty of evidence that should be considered that didn’t go through a multi-million dollar drug trial.

I am aware that occasionally antibiotics may be necessary, in a life-threatening situation. Thank goodness we have them for meningitis!

But I also believe that preventative antibiotics lead to ever-downward-spiraling health problems. I just can’t accept that 20 men on a firing squad are needed to remove a splinter. Just one trained practitioner, with fine instruments, is needed for that. We have lots of natural options that work, outside drugs.

Antibiotics—just one dose!—destroy the vast majority of healthy gut bacteria that is the crux of our immune system. A healthy gut has more organisms flourishing than the entire body has cells! And one round of antibiotic can cause cascading problems for years, even decades. I believe that virtually everyone in North America now has gut issues, and impaired digestion. The reasons?

Number one, antibiotic use. Number two, processed and preserved foods. Number three, genetically modified corn and soy, and hybridized wheat.

I wish that medical professionals would talk about the OTHER side of that issue—the guaranteed health problems that result from antibiotic use—and let the patient decide. That seems fair and right to me, that “professional liability” (CYA) not trump patient best interests to the point that so many of us are just avoiding the medical professional altogether.

I realize none of this is your fault, nor any single practitioner’s. The system has become very broken, where the American tort system has terrified doctors and made malpractice big business.

But I am on the patient advocate side, and I always look at what is best for the whole organism, for the long term. And I know quite a few docs standing up against the codification of medical care to be a monopoly for drug approaches—docs who are so angry that they risk status and even license to “do the right thing.”

I listen to people every day. At my lectures in 50 cities annually, and in emails, facebook, and my blog, people detail the chaos and devastation from their broken immune systems that always starts in the gut.

How do they have a chance, if AB’s are prescribed for just EVERYTHING? The body is never trusted, by the authors of the “standard of care,” to send white blood cells to the rescue and to do its job.

The medical system in the U.S., unlike in Europe and most other parts of the world, absolutely refuses to use natural plant extracts (herbs, essential oils, etc.) to aid and nurture the body’s immune system.

Antibiotics are a good thing only if they’re used once or twice in a lifetime, at most, to deal with an absolute crisis.

Twenty years ago, many who are well educated about the ramifications of AB use were sounding the alarm bell about overuse for ear infections and every cold and flu symptom.  Nobody listened much.

So we’ve gotten worse, rather than changing course. Now we prescribe antibiotics as PREVENTATIVES before every surgery, even dental surgeries. I worked on a mental hospital children’s unit where the kids were given MONTHLY antibiotics as preventatives!

I was told that endodontists would refuse to do a root canal on me, if I didn’t take a preventative AB. So I found an endodontist who didn’t have that policy. Perhaps he was stepping outside “standard of care.”

Or maybe he just looked the other way. (Later this month, I am having the tooth with that root canal, which failed 18 months later, removed. At the time I did not know how toxic the practice of fossilizing a dead tooth is. But now I do.)

Sure, on a rare occasion, there’s an infection that morphs to become something dangerous. But I take issue when doctors are alarmist about a possibility that is one in ten thousand. (That’s how docs got my mother to agree to AB’s every few months when I was a child—by telling them my strep could become scarlet fever.) I consequently spent a lot of my adulthood recovering my broken immune system.

Some of the risks of antibiotics are nearly 100%–yeast overgrowth and devastation of healthy flora in the gut, for instance.

In fact, on a rare occasion, an AB can be fatal too.

Most of the time, the body does its job after an insult like surgery, and the immune system is consequently strengthened.  My biological dentist has natural things to prevent disaster: before my oral surgery, I will have a high-dose IV Vitamin C. Dr. John Augsperger, who hosted my class in Colorado Springs last week, does the same, and he gave me his favorite dental hygiene product, the all-natural Tooth & Gum Tonic by Dental Herb Company.

I LOVE this stuff. No chemicals, alcohol, flavorings, preservatives, sweeteners, chemical poloxsamers or fractionated ingredients. It’s essential oils, herbs, all organic or wildcrafted. It’s the best mouthwash you’ve ever used, gum-disease preventative, and it’s really STRONG, too.

Dr. Augsperger is a biological dentist. I’ve found lots of them who research far beyond what the ADA-controlled dental schools teach, to discover a whole world of different thinking. It’s exciting, it’s empowering, it has lots of innovative solutions….and it’s just way outside “standard of care.”

Outside just dentistry, there are lots of natural antibiotics for child and adult use, that are cell specific and don’t destroy gut flora or healthy cells.  Colloidal silver. Garlic. Herbs like goldenseal.

Antibiotics virtually guarantee yeast overgrowth. They virtually guarantee that viruses and bacterial organisms will bring the whole organism to its knees, over and over, because now its defenses are down.

My friend Ben got a sinus infection and now he’s on antibiotics over and over, I think about 6 times in 2012 already. He has tons of devastating consequences for this vicious cycle, including terrible digestive problems, that many people suffer with now, thanks to our sick love affair with antibiotics.

(Similarly, medicine uses steroids with even more devastating effects on immunity.)

Anyway, Dr. L, this is my opinion and my experience. Since I started refusing antibiotics completely 17 years ago and using alternatives, my family has gotten dramatically healthier, and I’m happier with my arsenal of options, rather than being dependent on pharmaceuticals and waiting to get in to see a doc who, in the end, is kind of a one-trick pony with the prescription pad.

The main one, of course, is to keep them eating a plant-based, high-raw, mostly alkaline diet. Then they’re strong and far less susceptible to the scary stuff.

Your thoughts?

Kristin’s Tomato Confit

Do you have access to cherry tomatoes, in someone’s garden? There’s a huge field of them at the top of my street, abandoned by the grower because it’s too labor-intensive to pick them. So sad! My friend who owns the field and leased it out, just brought me a bucketful. If you’ve got access to some, this recipe of my site director’s will blow your mind.

My favorite thing to do with this stuff is dip brown-rice crackers in it (I get the Unsalted Plain or Sesame, no added oils or preservatives, brand Edward & Sons in the gluten-free section of my health food store). At the end of the recipe you can see the more traditional things Kristin does with it.

Kristin’s Tomato Confit (pronounced “cone-fee”)

Fill the bottom of a 8 x 13 pan with whole garden-fresh cherry tomatoes.   I also add yellow tomatoes for color if I have them.   You can also use chopped tomatoes fresh from your garden. Crush the cloves of an entire bulb of garlic and add it to the pan.   Add the leaves of two sprigs of rosemary.   Drizzle with olive oil and add sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste.

Bake at 300 degrees for an hour.   Smash coarsely with a potato masher once they come out of the oven.   Spread on bruschetta by itself, or with goat cheese or add to couscous, quinoa, or pasta as a sauce.

Broken ribs, Thai Lettuce Wraps

Day 4. It turns out I have a couple of broken ribs. Good times! Ice and heat, ice and heat, and this morning seems a bit better than the past few days. But I am going to Boise and Twin Falls anyway, in 2 days!

One more recipe from Michelle’s garden to deal with the lettuce onslaught, one of my favorite things, Thai Lettuce Wraps:

Thai Lettuce Wraps

1 head lettuce – any kind, but a firmer leaf works better

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 thumb size piece of ginger, grated

1 red chili de-seeded and finely sliced (you can leave this out if you want it mild)

2 shallots, finely sliced

1 C firm tofu, chopped into small squares

1 carrot, grated

1 egg white, organic, free range

1/2 C shredded red cabbage

3 green onions

2 C larger sprouts (bean, sunflower)

3  T lime juice

2 T Nama Shoyu

2 T fish sauce (or more Nama Shoyu – but the fish sauce does make this taste really good!)

1 T agave

2 T olive oil

Put 1 T. oil into wok or large frying pan.   Stir-fry garlic, ginger, chili and shallot for one minute over medium high heat.   Add tofu, carrot, cabbage and green onions and the other T olive oil.   Stir-fry for one more minute.   Add lime juice, Nama Shoyu, fish sauce and agave while stir-frying.   Push ingredients to the side and add the egg white.   Mix in with other ingredients.   Add sprouts, stir and remove from heat.   Taste and add fish sauce or salt if needed.

Serve in lettuce leaves and eat by hand.

Garden recipes!

from Michelle Jorgenson (more this week)–congrats to her for being so creative and resourceful with her spectacular garden (which will be featured on the GreenSmoothieGirl Makeover TV show, which we are almost done filming):

I love summer eating, because I try and use as much from the garden as I can.   You can tell your readers that if they don’t have a garden, try talking to their neighbors who do.   Often crops get out of control and gardeners throw away produce before they can get to it.   I just found a neighbor that has a HUGE patch of spinach and leaf lettuce.   It’s farther along than mine, and they weren’t using hardly any of it.   I asked if I can keep it picked so it won’t go to seed as quickly.   So I go pick it every third day or so, and it covers us for green smoothie ingredients.

So here’s some of the stand out  harvest recipes so far:

Salvadoran Radish Salsa

1 bunch radishes – any kind

3 tomatoes

1 small onion

1 bunch cilantro

1/4 t salt

juice from 1 lime

Chop all vegetable and mix.

Can also add the following for a hearty meal:

1 can black beans, rinsed

1 carrot, chopped

1 red pepper, chopped

1 C jicama, chopped

1 cucumber, chopped

1 T rice vinegar

1 more lime juiced

Salt to taste

(I just planted a second crop of radishes just so I can make this!   Made up the second version and took to a family reunion – only thing on the table that was gone by the end of the meal!)

I was determined not to throw away anything, so I figure out this recipe from the radish leaves!

 

Radish Leaf Pesto and Noodles

2 large handfuls radish leaves (from 2 bunches radishes), stems removed

1/4 C Parmesan cheese

1/4 C Almonds or pine nuts

1 clove garlic, cut in four

2 T olive oil, or more to get consistency you like

salt and pepper to taste

1 package whole wheat pasta (penne or rigatoni is best)

Put all ingredients in a high powered blender and process in short pulses.   You will have to scrape down the sides to get it all mixed in.   Add more oil is it’s too thick.

Boil a package of whole wheat pasta.    Cook it  2 minutes less than the package says.   Drain noodles but keep some of the cooking water.   Put noodles back into pan over medium heat, and add pesto.   Stir to coat noodles.   If too dry, add some cooking water.   Cook until pasta is done- 1-2 more minutes.   (Your noodles will taste so much better this way!)

Also can put radishes into any salad or stir-fry.   You’ll be surprised at how mild they taste cooked.

Avocado-Almond Sandwiches

When I was in Portland last month, GSG reader Debbie made all this fabulous food for the road. Which was a good thing, since we did 3 lectures in 24 hours, sometimes with a 2-hour drive, so we had no downtime. (Now she’s setting me up with some speaking engagements in Hawaii for September. Anybody have a place that would like to host, on any of the three major islands? Speak up now before we commit to some others, okay?)

When we got home, Kristin and I craved those sandwiches Debbie made. They were mashed avocado, with chopped Smokehouse Almonds, on Dave’s Killer 21-Grain Bread that you get at Costco.

When I got home, we came up with this healthy, sprouted version of “Smokehouse Almonds.” (I googled the ingredients and made lots of substitutions.) I added lemon juice, kelp, and garlic powder to the mashed avocado for the sandwich filling. You can eat the almonds any way you want–you’re not limited to chopping them for this recipe.

I made the sandwiches for my kids for dinner tonight and they loved them:

Smoke House Almonds

1/4 cup coconut oil

2  TBSP chili powder

1  TBSP nama shoyu

2  tsp Original Crystal Himalayan Salt

2  tsp garlic powder

1/2  tsp basil

1/2  tsp onion powder

1/4 tsp cayenne

7-8 cups sprouted, dehydrated almonds (soak truly-raw almonds overnight, drain and dry in dehydrator until crunchy)

Mix all ingredients except almonds in a small bowl.   Add nuts; stir to coat.   Arrange on teflex dehydrator sheets and dry at 105 degrees until crunchy.

Raw food weight loss

Raw food promotes weight loss in people who need to lose, and weight gain in people who are severely underweight from malnourishment.   Remember that unless you’re being excessive with nuts and seeds, raw food inherently is lower in fat and starch, which are what lead to weight gain.

To lose weight, following are a few ideas.   Put celery in your green smoothie.   It takes more calories to eat a stalk than you actually GET from it, so it’s bulk, to clean you out, bulk to fill you up, and great nutrition that actually nourishes the thyroid, which regulates metabolism.

Use cayenne, garlic, ginger, and cinnamon, too, to stimulate metabolism as you eat delicious raw food toward weight loss.   And don’t forget lemon juice in your water–it’s a great natural diuretic.

I got this great message on facebook recently from a Canadian reader named Karen.   She said she found GSG.com when googling 12 Steps for a friend in Alcoholic’s Anonymous!   As random as that seems, she called finding GSG “fate.”   She’s made some very significant dietary changes based on what she’s learned thus far, and has lost over 20 pounds.   She wondered if drinking a pint of green smoothie a day is enough.

Answer:   It’s enough for a wonderful first step!   Your body, mind, and spirit will tell you when it’s not enough any more, so listen to those cues and don’t stop your progress now.   My guess is you’ll want more sooner, rather than later.   Boutenko’s Roseburg study asked participants if they wanted to continue with their quart of green smoothie daily, and the vast majority said they wanted MORE, if anything.   I often drink THREE pints a day, though a quart is my average.