My Subversive (Garden) Plot

Listen to Roger Doiron’s TedTalk, about how we take control of our food supply and change the world. This video is worth your time:

View Roger Doiron’s TedTalk HERE!

I’m a huge fan of growing your own food. It can truly change your life. It empowers you. It connects you to your food source. It gets you out in the sun with your hands in the dirt, which gives you the most important hormone/vitamin to prevent cancer, and grounds you to help eliminate the harmful electromagnetic frequencies you build up. It saves you money. It will make you feel happy, I promise.

Step 5 in 12 Steps to Whole Foods is all about how to grow an organic garden, in any amount of space, and use everything you grow. Thank you to Marianne, our new webmaster and a longtime GSG reader, for sharing this video with me.

Winter gardening, prunes at Disneyland, & I’m teaching in Utah this month

It doesn’t happen often that I’m home for 3.5 weeks. I have three local classes to teach before leaving for Malaga, Spain Jan. 22 to study at the Budwig Clinic.

 

This past week, I did not take one single photo of my trip to Vegas for outlet shopping, then Disneyland with my kids. The only photos were the one I took with GSG reader Leah from Boston, who came and got me for a photo shoot from a gas station, ha that was funny, and some readers at a California Whole Foods Market. So unless they send those, I don’t have a darn thing to show for the past week.

While I was gone, Utah reader Dr. Michelle Jorgenson emailed me that her boys made $1,500 selling my cookie mixes in the neighborhood (recipe and idea in Ch. 11 of 12 Steps–your kids can do it, too) and that her December greens garden is going crazy! See the attached photos–I’m so inspired!

Emma and I are the only ones in our family afraid of nothing at theme parks. My youngest son won’t do stuff where the bottom drops out, you go really fast, or you do flips in the air. Cade and Libby are braver, but not that brave. So Emma and I stand in line, by ourselves, for Tower of Terror at California Adventure, and the XCelerator at Knott’s Berry Farm. That’s 205 feet straight up, at 82 mph, then you flip upside down and accelerate nearly straight down. The ride lurches to a stop. We look at each other, yawn, and say:

“That wasn’t scary.”

Our biggest challenge was entering the 90-minute-long line, where to break up the boredom, we challenged each other to a competitive game of “Toxic Mud Pits.” You cannot let your feet touch the concrete (swirling whirlpool of hot poison mud), through hundreds of feet of serpentine metal dividers. If you do, you die. Or you lose. Or something like that. Hundreds of people standing in line either helped us, by removing their backsides from the barriers, or refusing to move. (“That’s okay, we can work around you!” we’d say.)

Another convo:

Emma:   Mom, we are the ONLY weird family eating prunes in roller coaster lines at Disneyland.

Me:   I know. I don’t care. I don’t like to do stupid stuff just because everyone else is doing it.

(I said this as I stood in a 60-minute line to get into a little box and hurtle down two tracks for 90 seconds at high speed with a lot of screaming people. The irony was not lost.)

I have lots of cool stuff coming up. A series on my CANCER research in California and Mexico last month. A series with Melinda Hughes on women’s hormone issues, and using bio-identicals. Lots more cool announcements. More classes in U.S. cities. A GreenSmoothieGirl certification program. My biggest-update-ever, 400-page, 12 Steps to Whole Foods manual with tons of photos and more recipes and information, on high gloss. Readers’ Favorites recipe books, Vol. 1 and 2, coming out.

Stay tuned! I am excited for 2012!

 

Kristin’s Tomato Confit

Do you have access to cherry tomatoes, in someone’s garden? There’s a huge field of them at the top of my street, abandoned by the grower because it’s too labor-intensive to pick them. So sad! My friend who owns the field and leased it out, just brought me a bucketful. If you’ve got access to some, this recipe of my site director’s will blow your mind.

My favorite thing to do with this stuff is dip brown-rice crackers in it (I get the Unsalted Plain or Sesame, no added oils or preservatives, brand Edward & Sons in the gluten-free section of my health food store). At the end of the recipe you can see the more traditional things Kristin does with it.

Kristin’s Tomato Confit (pronounced “cone-fee”)

Fill the bottom of a 8 x 13 pan with whole garden-fresh cherry tomatoes.   I also add yellow tomatoes for color if I have them.   You can also use chopped tomatoes fresh from your garden. Crush the cloves of an entire bulb of garlic and add it to the pan.   Add the leaves of two sprigs of rosemary.   Drizzle with olive oil and add sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste.

Bake at 300 degrees for an hour.   Smash coarsely with a potato masher once they come out of the oven.   Spread on bruschetta by itself, or with goat cheese or add to couscous, quinoa, or pasta as a sauce.

do you have garden squash coming out your ears?

If so, me too! Finding a new squash recipe we really like is so fun. I wonder what the recipe below would be like with ZUCCHINI. If you try it before I do, let me know. I found this recipe on Hallelujah Acres yesterday, because one of their employees wrote me to say hi. They’d asked in their forum who their favorite blogger is and my blog had been popping up. That’s nice, thanks H-Acres readers.

Yellow Squash Raw Hummus

2 medium yellow squash (peeled, sliced in 1″ pieces)

1/2 cup pine nuts (soaked 6 hours and drained)

1/2 cup raw almond butter

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

3 garlic cloves (peeled)

juice of 1 Meyer lemon

1 tsp ground cumin

1/4 tsp curry

1 tsp. Celtic or Himalayan salt (or to taste)

pinch of cayenne (or to taste)

pinch of paprika

1/4 cup fresh parsley leaves (minced)

1/4 cup kalamata olives (diced)

Place all ingredients (except parsley and olives) in food processor with an S blade and process until creamy. (If too thin, add more almond butter.) Spoon into bowl and stir in parsley and olives. Cover and store in fridge. It will keep refrigerated for several days.

Broken ribs, Thai Lettuce Wraps

Day 4. It turns out I have a couple of broken ribs. Good times! Ice and heat, ice and heat, and this morning seems a bit better than the past few days. But I am going to Boise and Twin Falls anyway, in 2 days!

One more recipe from Michelle’s garden to deal with the lettuce onslaught, one of my favorite things, Thai Lettuce Wraps:

Thai Lettuce Wraps

1 head lettuce – any kind, but a firmer leaf works better

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 thumb size piece of ginger, grated

1 red chili de-seeded and finely sliced (you can leave this out if you want it mild)

2 shallots, finely sliced

1 C firm tofu, chopped into small squares

1 carrot, grated

1 egg white, organic, free range

1/2 C shredded red cabbage

3 green onions

2 C larger sprouts (bean, sunflower)

3  T lime juice

2 T Nama Shoyu

2 T fish sauce (or more Nama Shoyu – but the fish sauce does make this taste really good!)

1 T agave

2 T olive oil

Put 1 T. oil into wok or large frying pan.   Stir-fry garlic, ginger, chili and shallot for one minute over medium high heat.   Add tofu, carrot, cabbage and green onions and the other T olive oil.   Stir-fry for one more minute.   Add lime juice, Nama Shoyu, fish sauce and agave while stir-frying.   Push ingredients to the side and add the egg white.   Mix in with other ingredients.   Add sprouts, stir and remove from heat.   Taste and add fish sauce or salt if needed.

Serve in lettuce leaves and eat by hand.

More garden recipes, and a bedside update….

Thanks for all your kind emails and Facebook messages. I’ve been sleeping 12 hours a night since my accident Saturday; still unable to walk or do much of anything without acute/stabbing pain in my lower back/hip, and I wonder if it’s nerve damage, as I landed approximately on my hip’s sciatic nerve. I am hoping to get a PT friend of mine to come over today and start thinking about a diagnosis. My tennis team forfeits tomorrow without me. I am so used to boundless energy; thus this has been humbling. (I still plan to be in Boise and Twin Falls this weekend!)

Now, more from Michelle Jorgenson’s garden creating:

“So, next in the garden is rhubarb.   My family loves rhubarb, but you can only do so many things with it!   I’m still working to perfect the healthy rhubarb crumble, so I’ll send that some other time.   But, I did come up with a tasty fresh fruit crisp and some rhubarb strawberry jam.”

Rhubarb and Berry No-Bake Crisp

1 1/2 C chopped rhubarb

1/2 C water

1  T agave

1 C strawberries, sliced

1/2 C blueberries

1 C oatmeal

1/2 C pecans or almonds

1/4 C wheat germ

1/4 C coconut oil

1 T honey

pinch salt

1 t cinnamon

Put chopped rhubarb , agave and water in a small saucepan to cook.   Bring to boil and cook until rhubarb breaks up- about 3-5 minutes.   Remove from heat and cool.    Mix oatmeal. nuts, wheat germ, coconut oil, honey,  salt and cinnamon together in a bowl.  Add strawberries and blueberries to the cooled rhubarb.   Serve berries topped with the oatmeal mixture.   Can put plain yogurt sweetened with maple syrup on top.

Sugar Free Strawberry Rhubarb Freezer jam

4 C chopped strawberries

3 C chopped rhubarb

2 C water

2 T orange juice

6 T honey

6 packets stevia

2 packages unflavored vegan gelatin

Sprinkle gelatin over surface of water in a saucepan and let sit for a few minutes.   While it sits, chop the fruit.   Add chopped fruit and juice and bring to a boil.   Reduce to a simmer and cook until rhubarb starts to break up – 5-10 minutes.   Remove from heat and add sweeteners to taste.   Transfer to canning jars and close with lids.   Cool, then put in refrigerator or freezer.   Will thicken as it cools.

Makes about 5 pints

Garden recipes!

from Michelle Jorgenson (more this week)–congrats to her for being so creative and resourceful with her spectacular garden (which will be featured on the GreenSmoothieGirl Makeover TV show, which we are almost done filming):

I love summer eating, because I try and use as much from the garden as I can.   You can tell your readers that if they don’t have a garden, try talking to their neighbors who do.   Often crops get out of control and gardeners throw away produce before they can get to it.   I just found a neighbor that has a HUGE patch of spinach and leaf lettuce.   It’s farther along than mine, and they weren’t using hardly any of it.   I asked if I can keep it picked so it won’t go to seed as quickly.   So I go pick it every third day or so, and it covers us for green smoothie ingredients.

So here’s some of the stand out  harvest recipes so far:

Salvadoran Radish Salsa

1 bunch radishes – any kind

3 tomatoes

1 small onion

1 bunch cilantro

1/4 t salt

juice from 1 lime

Chop all vegetable and mix.

Can also add the following for a hearty meal:

1 can black beans, rinsed

1 carrot, chopped

1 red pepper, chopped

1 C jicama, chopped

1 cucumber, chopped

1 T rice vinegar

1 more lime juiced

Salt to taste

(I just planted a second crop of radishes just so I can make this!   Made up the second version and took to a family reunion – only thing on the table that was gone by the end of the meal!)

I was determined not to throw away anything, so I figure out this recipe from the radish leaves!

 

Radish Leaf Pesto and Noodles

2 large handfuls radish leaves (from 2 bunches radishes), stems removed

1/4 C Parmesan cheese

1/4 C Almonds or pine nuts

1 clove garlic, cut in four

2 T olive oil, or more to get consistency you like

salt and pepper to taste

1 package whole wheat pasta (penne or rigatoni is best)

Put all ingredients in a high powered blender and process in short pulses.   You will have to scrape down the sides to get it all mixed in.   Add more oil is it’s too thick.

Boil a package of whole wheat pasta.    Cook it  2 minutes less than the package says.   Drain noodles but keep some of the cooking water.   Put noodles back into pan over medium heat, and add pesto.   Stir to coat noodles.   If too dry, add some cooking water.   Cook until pasta is done- 1-2 more minutes.   (Your noodles will taste so much better this way!)

Also can put radishes into any salad or stir-fry.   You’ll be surprised at how mild they taste cooked.

Are you gardening yet?

I hope those of you doing 12 Steps are ready to look at Chapter 5, to plant an organic garden and use everything in it!

Today Jenni told me about this cool online tool, very easy to use, where you can map out your garden just by dragging and dropping the crops you want in each square.

We are planting spinach, kale, chard, and some other fun stuff this weekend. Sometimes it doesn’t work out because it freezes hard here in Utah, right after the seeds sprout, but I’m anxious to get some greens going, so I’m going for it. Especially with the supply problem in Texas, Mexico, etc., I am reminded of the importance of self-reliance!

I love my compost pile: CAUGHT ON VIDEO

I like gardening, but I love composting. It’s a no-brainer. It’s one of those “life is an eternal round” things. Maybe I’m weird and the Depression-era mentality lasted three generations, in me. But I love “waste not, want not” and I hate the throw-away generation and attitude. Turn your food into food for your food. Does anybody love plant garbage like I do?

Check it out here:

It’s a Beet Monster

I’m not even sure what to say about this, that came out of my garden today. Technically it’s a beet. I’m not sure the photos let you appreciate just how big it is, about 12 in. tall. It looks like a replica of a human heart—blood color, to be sure, but also with the aorta and ventricles and stuff.

So here it is: I cut the skin off, and chopped it into chunks. Then baggies in the freezer. It’s now 32 days’ worth of Hot Pink smoothie that I’ve been obsessed with, for breakfast, for about 8 years now (beets, carrots, frozen strawbs, coconut liquid—see Ch. 10 of 12 Steps, YUM).