My quirky weight-loss strategies, part 3 of 3

Another of my strategies is that I’m not afraid to skip a meal. I never, ever miss breakfast. And at lunch, because I always work out in the morning, I’m ravenously hungry. I don’t skip that either. But I often skip dinner, probably once a week on average. If I’ve had a big, late lunch, or a big late afternoon snack. Or if I’ve got a couple pounds to lose. It’s so good for your body to give it a rest.

I make sure I have at least a quart of green smoothie made FIRST THING IN THE MORNING. Then it’s made, so I’ll be sure to drink it since I’m not going to let it go to waste. And about 1 or 2 days a week, I have nothing for dinner except a green smoothie.

I go to bed hungry occasionally. Your body gets used to it. Your digestive system needs intermittent rests. (Don’t do this night after night, though.) It works best on a night that I’m really busy. If you’re really that hungry that you can’t sleep, eat a apple or banana (the magnesium in a banana will help you sleep). Or eat a big spoonful of chia seeds and chase it with a big glass of water. (It fills you up, for 40 calories and outstanding protein and nutrition.)

So, my second tip:

2. Skip dinner one or two days a week as needed, or have nothing but a quart of green smoothie. Have a day or two a week where you drink TWO quarts of green smoothie instead of one.

I virtually never eat after dinner, and I really try to avoid eating dinner late. (Eating late is only necessary occasionally because of a social situation.)

I drink a ton of water, most of it in the first half of the day. It helps your metabolism in countless ways. I drink a pint of water first thing, when I wake up. I don’t drink water with meals, but when I begin to feel just the tiniest big hungry, I drink a glass of water. Then I wait 20 minutes to eat a meal. That way the water is purifying, rather than being mixed with food and diluting gastric juices.

3. Don’t eat late at night.

4. Drink a ton of water.

I also never snack on sugar or processed foods by themselves. If I DO eat those foods, I don’t do it more than once a day and I do it only after a really good, 80%+ raw meal.

5. Don’t eat sugar/dead foods alone, only after a high-raw meal, and not more than once a day.

Finally, and this is a weird one, wear form-fitting clothes. ALL the time, even when you’re at home. The fastest way to lose track of how much weight you’re gaining is to do the baggy-sweats thing. Big, elastic-waist pants is you saying to yourself, “I’ve given up. Now I’m going to hide!”

They don’t have to be uncomfortable. On a day I’m working at home, in front of my PC, nobody’s around, like right now? I wear bike shorts or low-rise spandex pants and a very fitted t-shirt. If I’m up a couple of pounds, I’m annoying myself and I get serious about changing that situation.

6. Dress a little bit sexy. Even when there’s no one to impress but yourself, wear things that won’t let you get away with anything.

(Notice I said A LITTLE BIT. Please take this in the spirit it is intended, which isn’t to be provocative; it’s to wear things that keep you aware of any gradual onset of weight.) I never count calories, and I rarely get on a scale. This Strategy #6 keeps me honest.

You already know that keys to maintain a healthy weight are to rarely (if ever) eat animal proteins (and never processed meat), exercise regularly, and eat abundantly of whole, raw plant foods.

But these are my quirky, “works for me” habits that I believe lead to stable weight on the low end of the weight chart. I will be on a quest to learn more of these secrets that have served healthy people well, over a lifetime. Share your own tips here!

“what do you eat in a day?” [and more true confessions]

Every now and then I do a “what do I eat on a typical day” blog. It’s been a while! And I get asked this question constantly. So here’s what I ate yesterday, below. Since I’m doing True Confessions, here’s more. I don’t count calories, but long ago I did. I learned from logging everything I ate into DietPower, and also logging my exercise, that I need 1600 calories a day with NO exercise to maintain. I am just over 5’8″ and weigh 135 lbs. My body fat is 20%, and my BMI is also 20%.

I actually eat 2000 calories or more because I burn 400-800 a day doing 2 hours daily of cycling, running, playing tennis, doing yoga–and I’m finally back to weightlifting after an almost 2-year hiatus. (It went by the wayside when I started playing 4 seasons a year of competitive tennis.) (NO, you don’t need to work out that long! I do it because it makes me happy, as I’ve played sports since I was very young.)

Anyway, I give you all of this to compare, if any of those stats are relevant to you. For quite a few years, I have not gotten on the scale more than a few times a year. When you reach ideal weight, only addictions are going to get you into trouble. Sugar, white flour, caffeine, chocolate, meat, fried whatever, salt. Whole foods aren’t addictive, so generally you don’t overeat them. (Some people with heavily addictive patterns can overeat even complex carbs like oatmeal. Nobody really overeats greens, vegetables, fruits–hard to do!)

 

So this was my yesterday:

 

BREAKFAST:

Hot Pink breakfast smoothie (Ch. 10, 12 Steps–1 quart, about 400 to 450 cals., 10% protein, 10% good fats)

 

LUNCH:

Orange-Banana Squash (banana squash with orange juice, dates, cloves) (Junk Food Dude’s Yummy Healthy Recipes, not yet published, stay tuned)

1 pint green smoothie

Some black licorice (get a good kind at a health food store or Costco, sometimes you can find a brand with whole-wheat flour–the sweetener should be molasses only, no HFCS or sugar)

SNACK:

1 pint green smoothie

Hot cocoa” (coconut milk powder, really nutritious cocoa)

DINNER:

Green salad with romaine, tomatoes, cucumbers, orange bell pepper, sesame seeds, and Sun Drenchers Asian dressing

Big baked potato with some salsa and cashew-based “sour cream”

one of my favorite weekend breakfasts, pumpkin waffles

So my Breakfast class at the Zermatt Resort last week was great fun. Just one strange thing, I discovered after class when I went to sample the food: the chef apparently made my Pumpkin Waffles . . . without pumpkin!

Weird. But my newsletter with these recipes went out, and one reader immediately went out to find canned pumpkin and said “crop damage” means no canned pumpkin right now. Maybe that’s why! (I keep it in my food storage, so I didn’t know.) If you can’t get it in the store, hang onto this recipe, perfect for fall. Or used cooked pureed carrots, or your own winter squash or pumpkin, baked, outer peel removed, pureed.

Anyway, we love these dense, delicious waffles with raw applesauce from the apples coming out of our tree now (see the photo below of Tennyson picking them), and a little real maple syrup.

To redeem myself, here’s the recipe. It makes a big batch so you have leftovers, which you can freeze if you want.

Remember (read Ch. 9 all about this) that if you soak the liquids in the grains overnight, you neutralize phytic acids that may bind to minerals, making them unavailable to you. You also break down the proteins, making grains easier to digest.

PUMPKIN WAFFLES

2 cups whole-wheat flour (finely ground, soft white is my favorite for this)

2 cups regular rolled oats

1 (30 oz.) can pumpkin

¼ cup coconut oil (liquid)

3 Tbsp. Sucanat or unrefined coconut sugar

2 tsp. cinnamon

1 tsp. nutmeg

1 tsp. sea salt

1 ½ tsp. baking powder (no aluminum), reduce by ½ tsp. if you soaked grains overnight

1 cup yogurt or kefir

2 ½ cups water

2 tsp. vanilla

3 eggs (organic, free range) or 3 Tbsp. chia soaked in 9 Tbsp. water

Mix rolled oats in your high-power blender to break them down to a coarse meal. Mix the whole-wheat flour, oats, yogurt, and water together, then cover and let sit overnight (optionally). In the morning, add the remaining ingredients and mix by hand, but don’t overmix. Batter is dense, and baking time usually must be longer than waffle timer indicates. Top with Quick Raw Applesauce or plain yogurt, and real maple syrup.

Quick Raw Applesauce

4 large Jonathan or Fuji apples, washed/cored/quartered

1 cup water

1/3 cup lemon juice

2 tsp. cinnamon

½ tsp. nutmeg

1/3 cup (or more, to taste) maple syrup

Pulse all ingredients in high-power blender for a chunky sauce.

can you drink too much? (GS that is)

Q:Dear GreenSmoothieGirl: can you drink too much green smoothie?What time of day should I drink it?

A:I never have had “too much,” even when I want to “cleanse” a bit and have not much else but green smoothies for a week or more.You can go too fast for comfort at first (and suffer a cleansing reaction when your organs of elimination get overwhelmed).

Google “green smoothie experiment” to read, if it’s still there, about a woman who started over 500 lbs. and had nothing else for 5 months but green smoothies–and lost over 100 lbs.!

You’ll get bored before you get malnourished.

Drink it whenever you want–doesn’t matter.For me that’s lunch or late afternoon snack, often both.I frankly don’t WANT a green smoothie for breakfast or dinner.But lots of people are different, and I hear of people doing it for breakfast more often than anything else.

Eating right, even at Disneyland

Hi, Ben here—GreenSmoothieGirl.com’s webmaster. Robyn’s on spring break in SoCal, seeing Wicked and doing the theme parks with her family. But she left me her list of what she packed, to give you some travel ideas. She keeps her family’s energy high and digestion strong on vacation, while saving money on restaurants, by packing this stuff for breakfasts, lunches, and snacks.

Cooler:

Bags of baby carrots, sliced cucumbers, raw sweet potatoes

½ gal. homemade yogurt

2 bags Costco spinach

1 bag Costco frozen mixed berries

pint of soaked/drained sunflower seeds (to add to granola for breakfast)

quart of alfalfa/radish/clover sprouts (to add to granola for breakfast)

Box:

BlendTec

Plastic cups, straws, bowls, spoons, and baggies

Knife and cutting board for smoothies (I use it even on hotel room tables or vanities)

Lexan mugs for smoothies

Backpack for taking food to the parks

3 loaves whole-wheat bread

organic peanut butter-honey mix

gallon bag of homemade granola

3 boxes Rice Dream

gallon bag of soaked/dehydrated teriyaki almonds

Tonya’s “For Cryin’ Out Loud Dehydrator Onion Bread” (post to follow)

bananas (for green smoothies and to add to yogurt for breakfast)

bags of washed apples, pears, plums

 

5-gallon jug of filtered water