More pages for The Adventures of Junk Food Dude

Here’s the latest installment of illustrated pages (by Lori Sume) for The Adventures of Junk Food Dude. Thanks for the emails through the site, from those who are reading each installment to your kids. I loved it when Holly brought her 10-year old son over at my daughter’s soccer game–she’d read the pages to him. All feedback is helpful. Those of you who thought the first pages were too “achievement” oriented, I am going to address that. But I wonder if you feel somewhat differently as the story goes along . . . PLMK!

Radio chat with Carol–and more book illustrations

Great fun with Carol Tuttle on her radio show last night, listen to the recording HERE. At the end of it, she said, “It’ll be fun to keep connecting with you and see how this goes. Maybe we could play tennis sometime! But I think you might beat me.”

I said: “I plan to.”

LOL! Gotta love Type 3’s, right Carol?

 

Finally, here are the next 4 illustrated pages of my book, The Adventures of Junk Food Dude.

The Adventures of Junk Food Dude, illustrated

I’m just back from a 24-mi. Saturday bike ride in the beautiful Heber Valley, with GSGs Nicole and Angie. Nicole taught me about a “farmer blow.” (You don’t want to know. It’s for when you’re biking in the cold and don’t have a tissue. Don’t ride downwind of her, is all I’m sayin. Just teasing, Nicole–riding in your draft is awesome!) A flock of cranes, a flock of hot air balloons, the most beautiful red-and-orange scenery, made me whoop out loud.

I wanted to show off that my children’s nutrition book is well on its way to being illustrated. I’m so excited! Through the use of a narrative, children learn about not just principles of good basic nutrition, but they also learn their choices have power and impact in their own and others’ lives.

Lori Sume illustrated big posters announcing my four children’s births, that are framed and have been hanging on their bedroom walls their whole lives. She’s so gifted with art for this age group, 3 to 10.

So I just had to share some of the first pages with you. What do you think? Pre-order here for autographed copies when it comes out.

this is Dr. Campbell’s response

Tomorrow, on to other topics. Today, here is T. Colin Campbell’s response to Mercola’s missive:

Dr. Mercola raises so many questions that it would take me at least several weeks if not months to answer. He invents clever sayings and makes serious innuendos that are total nonsense–indeed slanderous. His questions are rhetorical, with meaning, and no matter what I say, the questions will always remain–without my answers.

But here are a few general comments that strike me as main points:

1. Dr. Mercola’s main mantra (business model) is Nutritional Typing. In some way (maybe with paid phone assistance from his staff), we are supposed to listen to our body to determine which of three dietary types best suit us. He then becomes more specific as to the importance of eating foods in the right order and of the right type. These recommendations, he claims, are science based.

This is a clever strategy for positioning his company in the marketplace. He casts a broad net to capture as many customers as possible for his many products that he sells. According to him, we fit within one of these three diet groups, ranging from 1) the high carb-low fat types vs. 2) the low carb-high fat types vs. (3) those in-between, thus capturing for his company a much larger customer base.

I deeply respect our personal freedoms to do as we wish (as long as it doesn’t harm others). But given the complex environment within which we choose foods, I cannot understand how we can reliably determine what dietary patterns and order of eating foods is best for our long-term health. I know that some people can recognize specific food allergies, but I also know that we tend to choose food for all sorts of reasons, not the least of which is convenience, avoidance of pain and sense of ‘pleasure’ or gratification (read the little gem of a book, The Pleasure Trap, by Lisle and Goldhamer to see how so many of us continually choose foods not in our best interests). His method defies common sense. He says that this is based on science but, if so, I want to see the evidence. I see none. To say that we can determine, with any certainty, which nutritional type, based on our personal but very nebulous assessment of our metabolism is hocus pocus.

On his claims about science, Mercola is out of his element–way out. He excuses his failure to document his professional experiences in the scientific literature because he (and his compatriots like Dr. Eades) don’t have time in their busy practice of medicine, as if public documentation of evidence is a bit of a luxury that is not really that important. This is an extremely lame excuse, exposing his fundamental misunderstanding of what scientific validity really means. Scientific evidence, as accepted by virtually everyone, is that which represents proper scientific experimental design and subsequent publication in the peer-reviewed literature.

Doing and reporting on peer reviewed research may not be a perfect solution for establishing truths (nothing is) but it is far better than listening to someone only telling us what he/she does or believes while giving us no way to evaluate such claims. Peer-review, the main engine of scientific validity, means that our research findings are subjected to the critique of professional colleagues before it is published in the professional literature. Even more to the point, in order for us to get the funding to do the research, especially from institutions like the National Institutes of Health (NIH) or the National Science Foundation (NSF), we are required to undergo a most serious and somewhat protracted exercise of defending our hypotheses before committees of professional peers that may include as many as 15 members (I know this, having been on several of these panels). The chances of successfully obtaining funding is, on average, only one in six. In short, peer review is rigorous both in getting the funding and in publishing the results. Anyone, like Mercola, who claims scientific validity for his personal/professional observations is really at liberty to say whatever pleases them–and their wallets. This opens doors wide for snake oil ‘science’.

2. He relies on the bogus idea that it is our individual differences in “metabolism” that makes it possible for us to determine which foods please our metabolism and guard us against future ailments.  He has no idea what is metabolism. It changes and responds continuously and it is an enormously complex system of digestion, absorption, transport, enzymatic synthesis and breakdown of intermediates and distribution, excretion and storage of metabolites, all in an effort to maintain homeostasis. Reducing this concept to a simple phenomenon of energy use, which we can assess for ourselves is more superficial than adjectives can describe.

Read the rest of this report here.

drink green smoothies all day and lose weight

You could literally drink green smoothies till you’re full, all day long, and still lose weight.

If you drank TWO GALLONS a day (that’s 8 quarts), you would get only 1500 calories. That 100 fewer calories than someone my height and weight needs, even if I don’t exercise, daily!

I’ve been accidentally saying the wrong thing in my classes. A quart of green smoothie doesn’t have 400 calories–it has 200! (Hot Pink smoothie from Ch. 10 of 12 Steps has 400 calories, perfect for breakfast.)

A quart of GS will fill up your stomach. I often get emails saying, “I can’t drink a quart in one sitting! How do you do it?”

Well, first, I’m just used to it. I burn 400-600 calories working out every morning so I’m really hungry at lunch time. Sometimes I save some of my quart for late in the afternoon, but often I drink it all at once–and I always have something else, too.) And sometimes when I have an extra pint in the fridge, I have another GS for dinner!

I also get this a lot: “I am hungry an hour or two after drinking my quart of GS. What’s up with that?” Well, what’s up with that is that it’s less than 200 calories.

I was filing stuff and found this DietPower breakdown of a quart of green smoothie:

¼ lb. spinach

¼ lb. chard

½ banana

¾ cup mixed berries

1 peach

Here’s what you get (with 1 ½ cups water and a pinch of stevia):

188 calories

84% carbs, protein 12%, fat 4% (That is a BEAUTIFUL macronutrient breakdown, by the way! If someone told you 20% protein is necessary, it ISN’T.)

Because this is the highest-nutrition, lowest-calorie thing you can eat, I outline a Detox plan (3 days) and a weight loss plan (30 days) in my book, The Green Smoothies Diet.

You also get, from this recipe:

More than 50% of your daily requirements of Vitamin C, Vitamin A, Vitamin B6, magnesium, copper, manganese.

Very significant amounts of fiber (31% of daily allowance), as well as niacin, Vita E, iron, calcium, potassium, and sodium.

p.s. I do recommend adding 60-100 cals. of flaxseed to your diet, and a GS is one easy way to do that. I buy sprouted flax on Amazon. It’s live and it absorbs less water in the smoothie since it’s already been soaked (and dried).

it was exhausting writing all those books

I got a call last night from my fulfillment company, saying we are getting low on 12 Steps: Complete Course, and I needed to autograph 200 books (The Green Smoothies Diet) and get them there by the next morning.

I was leaving for Cade’s baseball game and then Tennyson’s and wouldn’t be home till 11 p.m.

So I loaded several boxes of books in the car, took a couple of pens, and sat in the bleachers signing piles of books all night.

Tennyson came out of the dugout to chat with me at one point, and his buddy followed him over. I heard him whisper, incredulously, “Ten! Did your mom write ALL of those books?”

LOL! I love kids!

Speaking of, I have written a draft of Green Kids Rock Out Loud (or whatever the name ends up being). It’s a book about nutrition for kids age 3-9.

Two questions for you!

One, do you know a book illustrator who does colorful, fun illustrations? So far the ones I’m talking to need 9-12 months to do the work.

Two, would you let me interview your child who eats lots of healthy plant food, and is fairly chatty by nature? I’d do this by phone, asking just a few simple questions. If I use your child’s testimonial, you’ll get the book free. Even better, you’ll help get this book out. I was dismayed to survey the children’s literature on nutrition: not impressive. Thus this effort. I think it’s really needed.

If you know a book illustrator or want to participate in the testimonials, please write Jenni and Jackie at support123 at greensmoothiegirl.com. Tell me your phone number and your child’s name and age. J&J will forward it on to me.

Thanks!