Independence Day, part 1 of 2

Here are photos after my family’s annual 5K run at Provo’s Freedom Festival.

Runners in the photo are my dad, my son Cade, my brother Ben, my sister Betsy, and her husband Matt. (And my mom, who walked.)

Also here’s a random photo of my bro-in-law Matt and me doing a fashion shoot using my mom’s stylin’ bathrobes. (I went in her closet for a coverup because it was chilly after the race. My bro Ben said, “You’ve gone from cold to old.” Matt would like me to write that he is NOT pregnant–it’s the shape of the robe, not him.)

The race, on asphalt, exacerbated this horrific case of plantar fasciitis I’ve developed. On facebook, readers suggested these things that I am now trying: massage, Strassburg Sock at night, ice it, barefoot running, wearing shoes with supports in the house. I just gave up running, tennis, and Zumba for now, in favor of biking, Stairmaster, and weightlifting (ugh).

Anyone else get rid of it? If so, what did you do??

I ran it 5 minutes faster than I did 5 years ago. I beat everyone but Ben and my 16 year old son who has legs “up to here.” I’ve never beat my dad until this year. It’s fun to run with him because he talks about everything he sees as we go along (so, you have to turn your iPod down to chat with him). He turned 67 last month and guess what he did on his birthday. He ran 4 miles, just like he does every day!

My grandmother used to say, “It’s not what you do now and then, that will save or kill you–it’s what you do every day.” I believe my extended family’s excellent health is because of two things. First, the example we had and habit we formed of eating a primarily plant-based diet. Second, the example we had of being physically active. Breaking a sweat every day.

One of the most enduring memories I have of my dad is when I’d get up at 5 a.m. to practice the piano and go to seminary. He’d come home from his paper routes and his run, before work as an Air Force Lt. Colonel, Defense Intelligent Agent in the Pentagon.

I remember it well because he’d always want to talk: he’s Seinfeld’s infamous “close talker” and I have a sizeable “personal space” bubble. He’s the biggest patriot I know–a Vietnam veteran with a huge American flag cemented in his front yard. He’s one of those people who does the right thing, day after day, consistently. He’s my hero. In fact, I think I’ll tell a little story about him tomorrow.

Here are photos after my family’s annual 5K run at Provo’s Freedom Festival.

Runners in the photo are my dad, my son Cade, my brother Ben, my sister Betsy, and her husband Matt. (And my mom, who walked.)

Also here’s a random photo of my bro-in-law Matt and me doing a fashion shoot using my mom’s stylin’ bathrobes. (I went in her closet for a coverup because it was chilly after the race. My bro Ben said, “You’ve gone from cold to old.” Matt would like me to write that he is NOT pregnant–it’s the shape of the robe, not him.)

The race, on asphalt, exacerbated this horrific case of plantar fasciitis I’ve developed. On facebook, readers suggested these things that I am now trying: massage, Strassburg Sock at night, ice it, barefoot running, wearing shoes with supports in the house. I just gave up running, tennis, and Zumba for now, in favor of biking, Stairmaster, and weightlifting (ugh).

Anyone else get rid of it? If so, what did you do??

I ran it 5 minutes faster than I did 5 years ago. I beat everyone but Ben and my 16 year old son who has legs “up to here.” I’ve never beat my dad until this year. It’s fun to run with him because he talks about everything he sees as we go along (so, you have to turn your iPod down to chat with him). He turned 67 last month and guess what he did on his birthday. He ran 4 miles,  just like he does every day!

My grandmother used to say, “It’s not what you do now and then, that will save or kill you–it’s what you do every day.” I believe my extended family’s excellent health is because of two things. First, the example we had and habit we formed of eating a primarily plant-based diet. Second, the example we had of being physically active. Breaking a sweat every day.

One of the most enduring memories I have of my dad is when I’d get up at 5 a.m. to practice the piano and go to seminary. He’d come home from his paper routes and his run, before work as an Air Force Lt. Colonel, Defense Intelligent Agent in the Pentagon.

I remember it well because he’d always want to talk: he’s Seinfeld’s infamous “close talker” and I have a sizeable “personal space” bubble.   He’s the biggest patriot I know–a Vietnam veteran with a huge American flag cemented in his front yard. He’s one of those people who does the right thing, day after day, consistently. He’s my hero. In fact, I think I’ll tell a little story about him tomorrow.

double header Saturdays

Today I did what I’ve come to think of as quintessentially SPRING for me, for the past 10 years: DOUBLE HEADERS! One of my favorite things in the world is 4 hours of baseball on a sunny day.

My 16 y.o. Cade said something slightly snippy to me the other day about all those green smoothies he drank in the dugout that made him look like a “tard” in front of his friends. (I used to make his friends GS when they came over, too.) I reminded him that if it weren’t for GS and good nutrition in general, he might not be throwing 80 mph and hitting a GRAND SLAM this last week against Timpview HS and hitting 6’2″ on his 16th birthday. (Lowest ERA, by far, of all the pitchers, the most triples of all the batters–okay, I’m done bragging now.)

After all, before I educated myself, he was on FIVE COURSES of liquid steroids before the age of 2. Read the intro of my book The Green Smoothies Diet: his pediatrician told me 5 courses “virtually guarantees stunted growth.” That’s when I “checked out” of the doctor’s office forever and took my family’s health into my own hands.

So it was Tennyson’s double header today. He’s 9. He hit several doubles as “cleanup batter” (strategically placed #4 in the lineup) and struck some guys out as pitcher. As 3rd baseman, ran to field a ball at the pitcher’s mound and tripped over the pitcher, but not before throwing the runner out at 1st.

Ah, so many memories of my boys drinking their pint of green smoothies in the dugout at Burgess Field in beautiful Alpine, Utah. I wish I had a camera, today, for the shot of Tennyson slurping his GS, next to a kid drinking a Gatorade, and two other kids on the other side who were munching on Cheetohs and drinking a soda. What a great photo that would be for the kids’ book on nutrition I’m going to write.

Ten said that the kids asked him for some of his green smoothie. I love it!

Who ever said that baseball, hot dogs, and apple pie are the ultimate Americana? I’m going to pick and choose in that lineup.

bodybuilding and green smoothies, raw food

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl,

I just wanted to thank you so much for inspiring me to try your green smoothies.   I am totally hooked on them and I’ve started to crave them as well.   I feel so much better and energized.   I just came off my contest season and I’m now in the off season and it takes me awhile for my body to adjust to adding in more foods, etc.   The green smoothies have made it so much easier and I’m so glad.   I’ve never eaten so many greens in my life.   I, obviously, needed them after dieting for nine months this year and maintaining a 9% body fat percentage through my contests.   I didn’t realize that the more green smoothies you consume the less you want animal products, meats especially.   I have more of tendency to eat raw foods.   My oldest daughter is a rawfoodist and she loves the green smoothies too.   It makes it a lot easier for her to continued success with her own plan.

Also, I am a personal trainer and a lot of my clients are choosing to give the green smoothies a try and loving them.   So, thanks again for your continued support.   I hope to meet you in person in the future.

Talk soon,

Carmen Demske

www.myspace.com/sportskickinc.com

www.sportskickinc.com

Age 41

National Level Figure Competitor

Mother of 2:   Catalina 17 and Maizee 15

September 2009

Carmen6

defending that my diet’s not all raw

I read the raw foodists all the time (Patenaude, Wolfe, Boutenko, and lots more).   I think their diet is fantastic.   Sometimes I go all raw, for a few days, weeks, or even months.   I wouldn’t criticize anybody for a minute who wants to do it permanently, as some of my friends do–they all enjoy excellent health.

 

So why don’t I eat 100% raw and promote it on my site?   I thought I’d lay out my defense of NOT being all raw.

 

  1. Yes, when man discovered fire and begin to cook his food, he altered it for the worse, killing the life force in the food.  But I think we’ve adapted biologically to thousands of years of eating whole, cooked plant foods, eaten as part of a diet containing lots of raw plant food.   I think 60-80 percent is usually enough to provide outstanding disease prevention and an ideal weight.   EVERY meal and snack should contain raw plant food.   What we’re NOT adapted to is cooked, REFINED foods or a diet heavy in cooked food.    
  2. I think that grains and legumes are good food.   They’ve been used for thousands of years by most of the populations of the world.   They provide good energy in the form of both carbs and protein, and the perfect amount of fat (which is to say, not very much).   Hundreds of studies say they prevent disease.
  3. Most people can’t afford to eat 100% raw.   Boutenko said several years ago that her family of 4 spends $1350 monthly ($45/day).   Because I feed my family highly inexpensive whole foods in the form of legumes and grains, I spend $800/mo. to feed 50% more people than Boutenko does.   In summary, my program is very do-able financially.
  4. It’s very hard to feed kids, especially teenagers, an all-raw diet.   Without grains and legumes to give them higher calories and faster food to prepare, moms can really burn out and teenagers get surly and . . . downright hungry.   I have tried it.   It’s really hard (nigh unto impossible) to feed a house full of competitive athletes and teenagers all raw.  
  5. On the other hand, it’s not very hard to eat 60-80% raw, at least after completing a learning curve (my 12 Steps to Whole Foods program is the learning curve, as I experienced it, flattened out for my readers to skip all the rabbit holes I chased down that were a waste of time).   It is, however, nearly a quantum leap, I’ve found, to go from 80% to 100%.   It’s like the effort differential between getting a B+/A- in college, and getting an A.   That difference is MUCH bigger than the difference in your effort, for instance, between getting a C and a C+.   A 60-80% diet is achievable for anyone, allowing for social events not to become a stress and excellent health to be achieved.

So don’t get me wrong: I love the raw movement.   But Boutenko writes about people going 100% raw and then swinging to almost no raw, back and forth.   I never eat no raw–always, always 60-80 percent, even while traveling.   (You can get salads almost anywhere.)

And I think that’s the most important thing: to be consistent about eating well, and keep your “raw” above 60 percent every day and always as high as you can, so you are providing lots of enzymes and not taxing and aging your organs.   I also recommend having periods of eating as simply and as close to 100% raw as you can–like a “detox week.”

GreenSmoothieGirl Law of Physics (how will I find the time?) . . . part 2 of 2

Back to how it can be true that if you spend energy, you get energy:

First, are you a parent of at least two children, or are you close to someone who is?   Many first-time parents are so smitten by their firstborn that when they begin to consider bringing another baby into their family, they fret:   “I’m not sure I can love another baby as much as I love this one.”   Surely this baby has claim to ALL my love, new parents think.

 

Our concrete, finite minds not used to “abundance thinking,” sometimes can’t at first bend around the principle that spending can yield dividends.   That is, there’s more to be had, good things multiply, scarce thinking breeds actual scarcity, and abundant thinking breeds actual abundance–in relationships and the world.   Give some of your love and your CAPACITY for love multiplies.  

 

And so, parents take the leap and find, virtually universally, that they can, in fact, love another child as much as the first.   So much love that it makes your heart nearly burst sometimes.

 

Second, with the Olympics going on, one might want to consider Olympic athletes as well.   We love Michael Phelps, of course.   But Dara Torres is my all-time Olympic hero: because she is my age (41), and she silver medalled twice as of this writing, all while nurturing her competitors and chasing a toddler and proving to all the disbelievers that she achieved her athletic prowess and physique naturally.   She had earned a few Olympic gold medals before at least one of her 2008 competitors was even born.   While I was in Paris, I watched her on TV take first place in her qualifying heat after delaying the race to help another swimmer (who went on to take second) with a torn swimsuit.

 

Do Olympic athletes have less energy because they give so much energy to their sports?   No, they are fireballs of energy because energy begets energy.   When they turn their attention to other things–volunteerism, media, business, family–they have plenty to give.   And it doesn’t stop there: thousands of others are affected by their energy.   I have a big photo ripped from a magazine of Dara Torres taped right next to my computer screen.   Her arms, holding her daughter, are ripped and beautiful, and inspire me to push myself lifting weights.

 

Third, if you’ve ever owned a real estate property or started a company, you know that spending money on improvements often brings more business and profits flooding in.

 

So it is, with the time you will spend in the kitchen preparing a GreenSmoothieGirl diet.   That time will give back.   It will richly bless your life.   It will make possible your achieving goals you’ve had on the back burner a long time.   Go make it happen, one recipe at a time, just one step to whole foods at a time!

http://greensmoothiegirl.com/12-steps-to-whole-food-eating.html

How much water should a person drink a day . . . part 1 of 6

My husband and father-in-law are both former college football players.   My FIL was told, while playing football, “Don’t drink water!”   My husband was told by his own coaches and trainers in the 80’s, “Don’t drink too much water!”   Every year a college or high school football player drops dead in the August heat during what every football player knows as “two-a-days.”

 

We have been collectively rather confused about water, for a long time.

 

F. Batmanghelidj, an Iranian medical doctor, was a true pioneer, ahead of his time, and probably the main researcher behind changing attitudes towards water.   Football coaches know better, now, than to give the advice my DH and FIL got.   Dr. B spent over 30 years of his life trying to get the attention of the National Institutes of Health, the FDA, and medical journals to take note of his documentation of free, life-saving cure for common ailments.     He addressed a phenomenon every bit as common as constipation in our culture: DEHYDRATION.   (And dehydration is related to our chronic constipation problem, too.)

 

Dr. B’s teachings have often been repeated with the slogan, “You’re not sick, you’re thirsty.”   But we are still dehydrated and unaware of the many symptoms and problems that occur from not being hydrated.

 

Dr. B’s first experience as a young doctor reminds me of Dr. Colin Campbell’s paradigm shift studying cancer in children in the Philippines–and, for that matter, many great discoveries, like Ben Franklin, the kite, and electricity.   That is, it was accidental and totally contrary to what he expected to find based on conventional knowledge.

 

Dr. B was called to tend to a young man curled up in the fetal position from a peptic ulcer, in acute pain.   The young man was lucky his ulcer didn’t perforate, as he had eaten an entire bottle of antacid with no relief.   Having no medication, Dr. B gave him two glasses of water, and the boy began to recover.   Twenty minutes later another glass of water was given, and the boy was up walking around the room, pain free.

 

From Iran, Dr. B was wrongfully incarcerated after medical school and nearly executed when they discovered he was a doctor and could help in the prison.   During his stay of execution, he found an “ideal stress laboratory” in which to test his water hypothoses.   He presented a paper to his executioners and they dropped the 32 false charges so he could continue his research.   His discoveries about water were published as an editorial in Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology and in The New York Times.   The Journal of Anticancer Research published the essence of his first book on pain relief and water–all in the 1980’s.   The vast majority of his efforts to get the attention of the medical profession and policy makers were completely unsuccessful.   But I believe the public is now much more aware of the importance of drinking water primarily thanks to him.   You can read his theories in his books Water Cures and Drugs Kill and Your Body’s Many Cries for Water.