Can you believe this man is 57 years old?

frank K
Frank Kendralla

This is Frank Kendralla. I did my first-ever lecture in Pittsburgh, and he was the guy that, for most of the lecture, I could tell he already knew all this stuff. I reference many things in my lecture that are total eye-openers for 99% of Americans, and 90% of my audiences.

(Lots of holistic health coaches and practitioners come to my lecture tour. They’re a cut above, educationally. Many, though, come and are introduced for the FIRST time to principles of whole foods and a high vibration life. It’s news to most, why current practices in nutrition that obsess about calories and macronutrients, don’t tell the whole story. I talk about what matters most, in the decision of what to put in your mouth every day.)

That is, the vibrational energy of your food, micronutrient levels, and the quality and source of your proteins/fats/carbs. We go into detail on this, in my current lecture tour, How to Eat Right In the Real World.

Frank Kendralla came up to me after class and said, “I’m 57 years old.” I said,

“Shut. Up.”

(Sometimes the amount of time I spend with teenagers comes out of me. I’m not proud of it.)

He’s a grampa, and was there with his fit, lovely wife. When he was 16 years old, Frank read about Jack LaLanne. (Me too! One of my earliest heroes! Only I was about 8 year old, I think. My grandmother did his workouts!) LaLanne swam with weights attached to his shoulders, across huge waterways, in his 80’s, as I recall. He died just 3 years ago, at 96, and worked out the day before. He did vegetable juicing long before its time, and was an amazingly healthy man because he ate a mostly raw, plant-based diet, even though he was mocked for doing so, in the 1940’s and 50’s.  He was a high school athlete hiding from the team to eat his veggies and fruits and whole grains.

So after Frank read about Jack LaLanne, he told his very overweight, Italian family, “I’m going to eat healthy from now on because I don’t want to be fat like you.” Frank sheepishly admits that he has learned to communicate better, since then. The announcement didn’t go over big.

Frank had horrible nosebleeds when he was young. He got off dairy products and never had another one! He has made green drinks for 30 years. He has 1900 followers on facebook and doesn’t know most of them.

He hasn’t had a soda in 40 years. He never eats sugar or processed food. He isn’t a vegetarian, but he eats a mostly plant-based, extremely clean diet. He works two full-time jobs and has plenty of energy.

He kept telling me, “This stuff really works.” I don’t get to meet “the pure vessel” very often. But Frank is my new hero. What an inspiration!

Come detox with us, to start on Aug. 1, for a radical reboot you’ll never be sorry you completed (most later do it again). Come to my lectures if I’m in your city before the end of the year. The principles we teach really help us slow the aging process dramatically, like Frank obviously did.

You’re doing green smoothies? Great! Good start! Now jump in the deep end of the pool with us! My new lecture takes you to the next level, and 26 days in the GSG Detox is an investment in your most youthful, clean, high-energy self.

Questions and Answers about PROTEIN

Check out these common questions about protein, with my answers:

how much proteinQ&A

Question: What about “PERFECT PROTEINS?” Aren’t those the best?

Answer: No, not at all. A “perfect” protein just means it very closely matches human flesh. In fact, proteins from plants, where the body builds from the “raw materials” of amino acids (protein’s building blocks) yield more durable muscle mass. They aren’t “perfect” proteins, but that doesn’t mean they are inferior. Quite the opposite.

Eating the flesh of animals does “bulk you up” more quickly. It also breaks down more quickly.

boddy builderAnd eating the amount of animal protein that bulks up a bodybuilder also dramatically accelerates aging and increases disease risk.

(For a moment, stop looking at a bodybuilder or fitness competitor’s body, 99% of them who overload on animal proteins and whey protein powders. Look at their FACES. They look OLD.)

Question: Should I be worried about getting enough protein?

Answer:  Again, nope. The World Health Organization says 5% protein is adequate! Even an exclusively plant-based diet averages about 10%, especially if it contains decent amounts of greens, legumes, and nuts/seeds. Virtually no one in the world has a protein deficiency. We do, however, have deficiencies in many nutrients found in PLANTS.

R U sureWhat does the average American eat, relative to the 5% “adequate protein” recommended by the most legitimized health organization in the world? Fully 20% animal protein! This is more than any culture in the history of the world has ever eaten.

And the China Study (Cornell/Oxford collaboration) found, by tracking 6,500 people in China, that eating 20% animal protein is highly correlated to cancer, heart disease, and other risks.

Question: What if I feel better eating more protein?

Answer: First of all, consider this. The research doesn’t say, only A blood types have high cancer and other disease risk if they eat a lot of meat. It’s ALL blood types who do. The New York Times called The China Study the Grand Prix of Epidemiology. It’s the biggest nutrition study in history, and its main macro implication is, high animal protein diseases lead to all the diseases of the modern age.

If you “feel better” eating more protein, it’s only temporary. It has nothing to do with your blood type. Or what your ancestors ate.  That diet has made its creator a lot of money, but it’s been very well and soundly debunked. (Sure, you feel better “eating for your blood type,” but that is because the diet eliminates refined carbs for ALL the diets. Virtually all Americans eat lots of processed carbs, and you will always feel better getting off them.)

The easiest way to explain why the Blood Type Diet is a sham is to ask you two questions and let you mull it over. Use your critical thinking skills. First of all, are ALL your ancestors from the same place? How do people whose ancestors are from different continents prescribe their diet according to A, O, or AB blood? And, why did every one of the ancient cultures the authors refer to have ALL THE BLOOD TYPES? That’s right, ancient Asians had O, A, B, and AB blood. Ditto ancient Europeans. Hmmm. Makes you scratch your head, doesn’t it?

If you feel better eating a lot of protein, it’s because when you shift to eating a plant-based diet, your body immediately begins to detoxify. That process often initially involves weakness and fatigue. That’s simply a transition.

vegan energyI felt the same way when I stopped eating animals, a temporary malaise. Now I virtually never eat any animals (a bite of red meat now and then makes me nauseous, which I couldn’t have imagined back in the days I ate a burger for lunch every day). And I have never had so much energy. In my 20’s, I was exhausted by the things I now do on a daily basis, and love every minute of it! When I was 22, I was exhausted by the time I rented skiis, drove to the resort, and strapped on my boots. I did it to be with my friends, but secretly I wondered, “What’s fun about this?” That was my attitude towards much of my life! Now I ski 2-3 afternoons a week, after working out in the morning and doing my job all day, and I still have plenty of energy for my evening.

I’m just a case study. My experience isn’t everyone’s. I get that. I’m just using my own experience as an example. The principles in this answer are a synopsis of much reading and research, and they are solid and well documented. Unfortunately some of the Food Cults of the past few decades have you legitimately confused, conflicted, and overwhelmed.

Give any shift towards nutrient dense foods TIME. Be patient with temporary reactions that aren’t always comfortable. Proteins are needed to build and repair. But excesses of them rob the body of minerals. Excesses of them radically increase risk of cancer and heart disease and auto-immune conditions, due to fragments of undigested proteins floating in the bloodstream en masse, far more than the body can metabolize.

If you do eat animal proteins, eat only range fed and organic. This will massively increase your grocery bill, whereas legumes and whole grains, with 10 percent protein (which is ideal for digestion) are very inexpensive.

eat bloodQuestion: What about “eating right for my blood type?” Aren’t O blood types supposed to eat lots of animal protein, and A types do well as vegetarians?

Answer: I have written more extensively on this subject on the site. ( read it HERE) Let me give you the nutshell version of why experts like Dr. Joel Fuhrman have thoroughly debunked the junk science that underpins this fad diet. Before you get emotional about this because you feel better “eating for your blood type,” let me point out that EVERYONE will feel better eliminating processed foods, and thankfully, the D’Adamos tell ALL of the blood types to eliminate processed carbs.

But the entire philosophy is based on where your ancestors came from. What to do about people whose mother and father are from two different continents / cultures? And what about the fact, just think about this, that ALL of those cultures had A, B, AB, and O blood types? It all falls apart here.

Certainly people are all different and there is no “one size fits all” diet. If you are very emotionally attached to meat, eat it. Just eat very little of it (there is NO “type” who shouldn’t eat disease-preventative, low-environmental-impact raw plant foods, none!). And eat clean meat. (It’s very expensive.)

Question: Tell me one more benefit to not over-consuming animal protein, to pinkie push me into eating more legumes and nuts and seeds and greens!

Answer: I confess I made this question up. No one has ever asked it of me before. It’s a totally opportunistic fake question designed so I can tell you THIS:

food moneyWhen the economic bubble supporting meat and dairy bursts, you’re not going to be able to afford meat or milk. It takes 20 pounds of plant food to yield one pound of beef. That’s why no other culture in the history of the world has eaten as much meat as we do! (Yes, some cultures who lived on the water ate LOTS of fish, or whale blubber. But this was long ago, when fresh fish nutrition wasn’t heavily counterbalanced by terribly polluted waters.)

Do the math. If one pound of plants costs $1, then a pound of meat, with NO PROFIT for the rancher, should cost $20/lb.! Oops, we forgot to factor in that that same pound of beef also requires 1,000 gallons of water! You read that right. One thousand gallons.

So, when the U.S. government stops propping up meat and dairy with subsidies, people will be FORCED to stop eating it, unless they have a ranch with all the raw materials and can raise beef and pigs and chickens themselves.

We might want to just get used to eating low on the food chain now.

What to do about WRINKLES?

images-43After yoga, when I’m rolling up my mat, seems like often a GSG reader comes over to chat. Tell me their green smoothie experience, ask what to do to help a friend struggling with health problems, ask me when the group buy ends. Stuff like that.

Recently, Cheryl, a 53-yo, very fit breast cancer survivor, had a new one:

Cheryl: What do you do about wrinkles?

Me: Ummm. How about, you love them?

Cheryl’s not buying it. She doesn’t want wrinkles apparently. She wants to be 53 but look 33. She tells me that it’s easy for me to say, because I don’t have them. (Yes I do, around my eyes—they show up when I laugh and smile. Which I will continue to do as much as possible.)

I point out to her that, first, I’m younger than she is. And second, while I play tennis and don’t use sunscreen, I don’t have a half-acre, award-winning yard in the summer, and work as Ski Patrol all winter, like she does. Both of which cause year-round high sun exposure here in the Rockies where we’re 4200 feet above sea level and the air is thin.

She won’t want to hear that I don’t have some magic product, except organic, extra-virgin coconut oil, which I slather all over my face at night. I love it. I want to make a big vat of it and roll around in it. Its healing properties aren’t just something I read about in a book. My family and I have experienced them, and I’ve heard from hundreds of readers about what high-quality medium-chain fatty acids do for them.

I say this:

images-45“What if you took all the energy you’re giving to fretting about it, and put it instead into reflecting on all the great stuff in your life that gave you those beautiful lines?”

I mean, at the end of the day, we live a healthy lifestyle (which Cheryl does), and then shouldn’t we enjoy being the age we are? 53 is awesome, if you can do a headstand in yoga like Cheryl can, and most of the 33-year olds wish they had her loveliness. With lines or not.

If a much younger guy flirts with me (cougar hunting is all the rage), I confess that I feel insecure. If tell him my age, I’ve had a dozen say, “Who cares? A beautiful woman is beautiful at any age.”

Why can’t we just OWN that? When we’re 63, we’re going to look back at 53 and wish we’d enjoyed how young and beautiful we were.

I think women with experience-lined faces are gorgeous. Sexy, pretty, beautiful, and cute, too. (My friend Tim says there are five types of attractive women—the ones I just listed. My friends and I play a game of slotting celebrities and people we know into those categories according to Tim’s definitions and examples.)

images-46What you’ve accomplished and experienced in your life is written on your face. Why is that a bad thing? Why do we inject dead botulism into our face to erase that? To flat-line all expression?

Use plenty of cold-pressed coconut oil on your skin. Your skin, and then your bloodstream, just eats it up. It’s skin food. But let’s embrace the much-maligned “fine lines and wrinkles.” We’ve earned them. They’re only a “bad” thing if we let them be. It’s all in the mind. How much control are you going to give popular culture, over your heart and mind?

Today, wrinkles. Tomorrow let’s talk about scars.

dramatic testimonial from “the happiest grama on the planet”

We get a lot of wonderful testimonials, both in person when I teach, and via email on the site. Few are as dramatic as this one we got from Mary Kay:

Since hearing about your website six months ago, I have been drinking a quart of green smoothies every day. People I meet now ask me, “How do you look so good, how do you stay so skinny, how do you have so much energy?” I tell them about your website and they either walk or run to get a blender and start the practice for themselves.

I have had a profound personal healing experience. I was STUCK in an abusive marriage and lost my will to live. Luckily, I had a compelling reason to get out and now I live on my own. I was emaciated (5’9? and weighed 120 lbs), had daily anxiety, my skin was wrinkly and I had no color in my cheeks. My eyes were dull and bloodshot. My hair was mousy and lifeless. I had no energy and no muscle tone. I was achy and stiff and VERY constipated.

Six months later, my skin is glowing, my hair is shiny and my nails grow super fast. I am emotionally stable again, and I dance and sing and laugh. I have a challenging job and ride my bike to work. I am at my ideal weight again (130), which is what I weighed in high school. My digestion is vastly improved and I guess I just glow. I was recently at a family reunion and my aunts and uncles and cousins raved about how good I look.

I attended your class recently in Sandy and found it very inspiring and fun.

I have a hard time making only a quart of smoothie. I usually end up with the whole blender jar full, so I jump on my bike and take it to share with my daughter and my grandbaby. A Vitamix blender jar fits perfectly in my backpack!

–The happiest Grandma on the planet thanks to you!

We love the SOUTH! Part 3 of 3

Sometimes we meet readers who are just pure inspiration to us all. We got a letter from Annette before we left for Atlanta, telling us about her parents in advance of them coming to our class in South Carolina.

Mel and Julie Lacock are 78 and 73, spry and healthy, and they’ve been eating a mostly plant-based, whole-foods diet, for almost as long as I’ve been alive. Mel reminds me of my own daddy, who is 69 and still runs 4 miles a day.

Here’s what Annette said about Mel and Julie (edited version):

“My parents are two of my heroes, for the health choices they made 42 years ago, the reason I’m so passionate about eating a plant-based diet for life. You share in your lectures that if the young mothers today will embrace a whole-foods, 60-80% raw diet, and teach their children the same, then there is hope for America’s health.

“My parents returned from a mission in Taiwan and learned from a naturopath about the raw food diet. They maintained that for a while, on a missionary’s budget, feeding three small children. Eventually they embraced more cooked food, but retained a high-raw lifestyle. They ‘made’ us eat healthy.

“They didn’t have the aid of the internet, libraries, or a popularized vegetarian movement. I realize now how tenacious my parents were to self-educate and thereby protect their own health and pass a wonderful example on to their children.

“They are living WITHOUT MEDICATION, eating a plant-based diet of vegetables, fruits, grains, legumes and seeds from all over the world where they have lived.

“Two of their children have turned to the Standard American Diet, with exactly the effects you would predict. And my parents’ peers are dropping like flies and eating lots of medication—the contrast is stark.

“I have great health because my parents safeguarded it when I was young. I veered into the S.A.D. for a few years, but I returned and have never looked back.”

What a love letter! I got emotional when Annette sent it to me before we flew to Georgia. Then I met her lovely parents, and I found tears in my eyes again as I edited this condensed version of her tribute to them.

I hope my kids “get it” enough to write something like that, someday. Don’t you? Who needs it on a headstone! I want to read it on the GSG blog while I’m still living, hehe.

And Mel and Julie get to do that—read it on the GSG blog—because they’ve taken the path less traveled and changed the course of their daughter’s life.

If my grandmother were still with us, she and the Lacocks would be fast friends. I remember that when my grandmother learned that oxygen spells death for cancer, and that a raw plant-based diet has the power to starve it out, she became a little “out of balance” in life.

Very normal, of course, given her diagnosis and a doc telling her she was going to die. Most conversations with her were about food, and most people found her to be a little militant and dogmatic. She eventually balanced out, and returned to thinking about other things besides just food—but many of you know what I’m talking about here:

When your eyes are first opened, you’re astonished. You’re angry, even. You want to tell everyone. Then, you’re frustrated when almost no one listens. It may take years to find ways to talk about your lifestyle that more people are interested in, and will take at least baby steps towards it. They do it because of your example and patience. They never do it because you’re preachy, condescending, or strident.

Here’s a photo of me with Mel and Julie Lacock that they just emailed. I’m inspired by their long-time stamina and consistency in living the truth. That’s why they look so good. Kristin kept saying, “I can’t believe he’s 78!

Love to you all for being a part of this movement. I cannot do it without you. We continue to spend $0.00 on advertising, thanks to your spreading the love to people you care about. God willing, I’ll keep teaching the classes if you keep showing up with your friends and family who are sick and tired of being sick and tired.

Mortality, goodbye to my grampa, and taking youth for granted

Last weekend my grampa was in a hospital with pneumonia, his blood pressure 70/30 and they were unable to get an IV needle in him. We talk every day, my aunt or my dad, and I, about whether it’s time to fly to Couer d’Alene (via Spokane) to say goodbye. The crisis seems to be averted for now. My grampa has had dementia for many years, and doesn’t know me when I see him.

I want to go with them, since there won’t be a funeral or memorial service, per Grampa’s wishes. He’s a WWII vet and has paid in advance to be cremated, and his ashes spread over the Pacific.

Glen Alfred Openshaw has lived till 93 despite many years of alcoholism and chain smoking. His first wife, my grandmother, put a bullet in her brain when my daddy was just 12. My dad was a crossing guard assigned by the school, and was standing in the crosswalk holding children back to safety with his arms when a neighborhood friend ran up to tell him his mother was being removed from the home by ambulance. My dad stayed another 20 minutes to finish his duties—this tells you about the kind of human being  he is. Loyal, hard-working, duty-oriented.

I imagine, with the addictions he developed, my grampa was running from ghosts. However, he did kick both of those habits when I was young, and saved his fifth marriage and probably the last half of his life, in so doing.

Before we got the word about Grampa, I was in the stands watching Cade pitch another 11-1 game, so close to being another shut-out, against Orem High. My two youngest brothers were there, Spencer and Ben, whom I refer to as Spennie and Bennie. They are lifelong best friends. Spencer arrived with Dill Pickle flavored sunflower seeds, and we had this convo:

Me: Did you get those because it’s a baseball game and all baseball players spit seeds?

Spencer: No, I actually just had them in my car.

Me: Well, I don’t want to ruin your enjoyment of them, but did you know that flavor is loaded with MSG?

Ben: We know! That’s why we buy them! In fact I am looking to buy some EXTRA MSG sunflower seeds. It is my favorite food, MSG is. [Both my brothers laughing and eating seeds.]

Me: Okay. Well. Informed decisions are good. Now you’re informed.

That same week, I had a convo with my friend Sam who is a golfer, basketball player, and 4.5 tennis player and coach, an R.N.—as well as a smoker. Not for the first time, I told him how much I wish he would quit.

Much like I begged my grampa to quit smoking, when I was a little girl, and flushed his cigarettes down the toilet—my grampa did quit and never smoked or drank again.

In response, Sam said, “Here’s the thing. Nobody loves their life more than I do mine. But I don’t want to be 70 years old! I want to die before then.”

I said, “Yeah, but remember when we were 20 and we thought 40 was old? We figured, who cares if we bake in the sun, or get drunk and eat junk food! We won’t care when we’re 40 because old people are just OLD and don’t care about anything.”

Sam laughs and says yes. “So,” I continue, “what if it’s the same way when we’re 70? We don’t know, because we’re not 70 yet. But what if you GET there and you really WANT to keep living—not only living, but living WELL, for another 30 years?”

“Why do you want to make that decision NOW when you might be just as in love with life, at 70?”

I love the way we rationalize our way out of the consequences of our decisions with silly logic.

There’s another problem with Sam’s logic: what if you DON’T die, but are just sick, and smell awful, and have a hacking cough and black lungs—emphysema or lung cancer for years and years? What if you don’t die until 70, but you wreck the life you could have been living in the meantime?

I love that my grampa has lived 93 years. I wouldn’t want the last 15 years of his life, for myself, though. I hope to keep my brain free of metals and junk, so I’m clear as a bell till the end.

I want to go out like a light switch, not on a dimmer bulb. I want that for my family and friends, all of you, too.