HEALTHY CHOCOLATE MOUSSE

 

Here’s a recipe for CHOCOLATE MOUSSE, one version of a favorite and very common recipe among raw foodies. It’s so easy, and it might get you through a party where everyone else is eating shiz!

(Shiz is my kids’ latest word for ‘all things bad.’ I think they’re approximating a swear word in a way they get away with it?)

HEALTHY CHOCOLATE MOUSSE

1 ripe avocado

1 ripe banana

2 soft dates

3 Tbsp cacao powder

Splash of vanilla, pinch of sea salt

Blend till creamy, optionally chill for 1-2 hours, and enjoy!

Two great recipes and an awesome new ingredient!

I  recently gave a lecture in St. George, Utah, and in three other Nevada and Cali cities. In St. George, we stayed with my longtime friends, vegan raw foodists Denley and Jan, whose kitchen and fridge contents always inspire me.

Denley was raised on sodas and Twinkies, and eventually he was so ill that he discovered that he could recover his health ONLY when he eats vegan and virtually 100% raw. They have raised their six children on a plant-based diet. They made that shift when their twin daughters were born with cystic fibrosis. Now both are mothers of 6 and 7 children and are healthy vegans even though most with CF don’t live past 25.

Next time I stay with Jan, I’ll make a video of all her great nutrition habits and gadgets.

She made us a fabulous dinner when we pulled into town, and Kristin and I couldn’t stop eating apples dipped in the fruit dip, recipe below, that tastes like marshmallow cream. But it’s all raw, with no sugar, guilt free! (I can eat it without having to pay Matthew $10,000—we’re both going strong, by the way, after 3.5 months. Easy!)

Here’s the recipe I’ve adapted from Jan’s—she keeps a jar of Irish Moss gel in her fridge, which is a whole-food thickener, gel, and emulsifier. It’s the raw, nutritious form of “carageenan” that you’ve seen in ice cream, etc., You can get it on Amazon and many other places online or possibly in your health food store. Buy unbleached “Carageen” raw Irish Moss so you’ll get the sun-dried rather than bleached product. The Irish eat it with potatoes and cabbage!

In addition to its function, it’s a nearly flavorless seaweed that, like other algaes, is an excellent source of iodine, minerals, A and B vitamins, and protein. It is soothing to mucous membranes and thus may help with indigestion, constipation, and skin conditions. Some use it in water to ease coughing associated with colds, bronchitis, and pneumonia.

You’ll have fun using it for ice cream, shakes, puddings, and more…give it a try! I personally am so excited to discover this ingredient. Having enough ingredients and habits that you love is KEY in making a transition to raw plant foods easy and “deprivation-free.”

Fruit Dip / Topping

1 cup macadamia nuts

2 Tbsp raw almonds, sesame seeds, or cashews, soaked overnight and drained

6 Tbsp. water

¼ cup Irish Moss gel (see below)

1 Tbsp. coconut oil

1 tsp. vanilla

¼ cup raw, organic agave, or raw honey

1/8 tsp. Original Crystal Himalayan Salt

Blend almonds, sesame seeds, or cashews in water, in turbo blender until creamy, about 90 seconds. Add remaining ingredients and blend until smooth. Refrigerate for 1 hour or overnight, will last 3-4 days. Use as a dip for fruit, or as a topping for a pie.

Strawberry Shake

1/2 cup Brazil nuts

1 ½ cups water

¼ to ½ cup Irish Moss gel (see below)

1 cup frozen strawberries

8 drops liquid stevia, or ½ packet dry stevia

1/2 tsp. vanilla or pinch of a vanilla bean

Soak Brazil nuts several hours, drain and rinse. Blend soaked nuts in 1 ½ cups water for 90 seconds or until very smooth, in a high-speed blender. Add remaining ingredients and blend on high until creamy. This is a low-sugar treat your children will love and you won’t feel guilty about.

Irish Moss Gel

Keep the dry moss refrigerated in a sealed Ziploc bag or jar. Soak a handful in a quart jar full of water for 3-5 hours on the counter. Drain and rinse well (you may have to pick out bits of shell/sand). Blend ¼ cup soaked, packed Irish Moss, with 1 cup filtered water until smooth. Store in fridge in a glass jar for up to 2 weeks. Use in potatoes, gravy, ice creams, puddings, etc.

Young Vegetarians, share this with your kids, part 2 of 2

I like this YouTube video about another vegetarian athlete, Jake Shields, whose parents never served animals but didn’t talk about why. Now Jake converts other athletes, who are amazed at how endurance increases when they eat only plants:

Have your children look at all these world-class, famous athletes, including rocked-up bodybuilders, who don’t eat other creatures.

In addition to so many athletes, how about these brilliant vegetarians? Socrates, Plato, Pythagorus, Da Vinci, Newton, and Einstein! You know that song Adam Sandler did about all the famous people who are Jewish? Who wants to do one about people who don’t eat our friends?

Looking at that list of genius vegetarians, I hypothesize that freeing energy from digestion allows the mind and spirit to soar and creativity to be untrammelled. Either that, or people who think outside the box are willing to buck social norms to do what’s right and what logic dictates. Probably both.

Abraham Lincoln, Michael Jackson, Brad Pitt, Carrie Underwood, Mark Twain, Ann Hathaway, Natalie Portman, Pink, all of the Beatles, Billy Idol, Rosa Parks—all vegetarians.

Dr. Thomas Lodi has been vegan for 46 years. He can’t even eat in the presence of those consuming, as he puts it, “carcasses and animal excretions.” He points out that the human digestive tract is 30 feet long, like all vegetarians, whereas the carnivore GI tract is very short. (I became convinced by the “we aren’t built to be carnivores” logic 20 years ago by John McDougall.)

Therefore meat takes sometimes days to digest, and in your gut it does the same thing it would do on your counter: it putrefies. (Many of the healers I am studying point to the strong evidence that undigested proteins in the blood and gut lead to all the modern diseases.)

This is my paraphrase, with some stuff from me added, of what Dr. Lodi teaches people in their first group session with him at Oasis of Healing:

If we were carnivores, and a chicken walked in the room, we’d salivate. We’d pounce on it and tear it apart, eat its heart and liver out of its warm abdomen. We’d maybe swallow the sinewy eyeballs whole, and crunch on some bones. Everything but the feathers we’d tear apart with our long incisor teeth.

But we’re not carnivores. We don’t have long teeth. Because of our biology, we can’t stand to eat raw flesh. And after an hour, dead flesh goes into rigor mortis, and then we REALLY can’t stand to eat it. So we hang it for several days to “age” it (translation: allow it to rot), we cut the maggots and really disgusting parts out. And we STILL can’t stand to eat it. So we cook it. We might put some tasty cancer-causing nitrates in it, if it’s bologna, bacon, sausage, etc.

f you signed on for this gross-out lesson towards a plant-based diet and you are still reading….you might be more ready to give up eating our animal friends than you think you are!

If you need a final pinkie push, order Mike Anderson’s film called Eating. I’ll be amazed if you can watch the avalanche of data, and images of how animals are raised for eating in America, and not vow to stop contributing to it. Every plant eater should own a copy of it.

Young vegetarians! Share this with your kids….part 1 of 2

My 16-year old daughter Emma has been a vegetarian since age 11, and she loves to evangelize.  When there’s a debate in a school class (it always seems to revolve around “where do you get your protein?”), she comes to me and asks for verbal ammo.

Right now she and I are both writing on our computers. She’s writing a speech for her AP Government class on the issue of government subsidies of the meat and dairy industries.

I suggested the topic and told her she would be outraged to study how our government is using our tax dollars: to fatten the wallets of our farmers with the biggest operations, the ones who already have incomes far surpassing affluent Americans. We heavily subsidize meat and dairy in the U.S. Meat would cost about $20/lb. if there were no government support. This makes sense when you consider that it takes 1,000 gallons of water, and 20 lbs. of plants, to raise one pound of meat!

Emma just came in my office to show me a graphic illustrating that only one-third of one percent of government subsidies go to fruit and vegetable growers. Over 75% of it goes to meat and dairy ranchers, and the rest goes to the wheat, soy, and corn that feeds the cattle and chickens.

Her thesis is that we could kill three birds with one stone, if you’ll forgive the pun. By eliminating subsidies on meat and dairy, the free market system will correct America’s health problems, the ways we grossly mistreat animals, and our obscene tax burden. Vegetables and fruits will cost $1/lb. and animal products will be exorbitantly expensive, so people will naturally begin to eat more plants and fewer animals.

Emma’s in love with this kid, the Vegetarian Athlete, and sent me this link.

This 21-year old college athlete is 6’6″ and has never eaten an animal in his life. He was taught from early childhood, “Animals are our friends, and we don’t eat our friends.” This became a core belief. Now he and his sister are adults and the idea of eating (pus-, antibiotic-,   steroid-, growth-hormone-, bacteria-tainted) meat is unthinkable to them. Check out the chart his mom shows in the video, that the top 5 highest-protein foods are plant foods!

Emma printed off the chart of high-protein foods and supplied it to a girl at school named Vanessa, whom Emma recently converted to a meat-free diet. (Many people WANT to be converted—they just need a little pinkie push, in the form of some compelling information.)

Apparently Vanessa’s mom was resisting her vegetarianism, telling Vanessa she had to eat meat to be well nourished. Vanessa presented her mom the list showing grains and legumes and nuts among the highest-protein foods. And that did the trick! (Vanessa’s mom was once a 4th grade teacher at my children’s elementary school and even though she’s a kind and dedicated teacher, I requested the OTHER teacher, only to avoid all the candy-as-rewards in her classroom.) Even the educated among us, I find, have little knowledge about health and how critical nutrition is.

 

Beet Kvass

I recently taught you how to make Rejuvelac. If, like me, you’re looking to increase lacto-fermented, probiotic foods in your diet, today I’ve got another idea for you. (Try to get at least two cultured foods in your diet every day! This is Step 8 of 12 Steps to Whole Foods.)

Have you ever heard of Beet Kvass? I recently had some when a vendor wanting me to sell his stuff mailed me samples. Too expensive to buy on the internet and ship—but I loved it. I am going to plant even MORE beets next spring. I have lots of jars of cultured beets in my food storage, which are 3 years old, but now I’m making them into a probiotic drink. I remember how shocked I was to learn that you could “put up” raw vegetables that “keep” for long periods of time, using lacto-fermentation. Now it seems common and easy, a “lost art” that people have done in virtually every culture of the world for thousands of years.

One of my employees, Melinda, said to me the other day about a pile of beets from my garden, “I love how beets look!” Kristin just saw this photo on my computer and made the same comment. ME TOO! They’re so ruby-red!

That juice staining your hands is potent pigmentation with high levels of carotenoid and other antioxidants that protect your eyes, normalize blood pressure, and cleanse your blood and your liver.

If beets make your urine pink, please read more detail about that in Chapter 5 of my 12 Steps to Whole Foods manual.

Cultured Beets / Beet Kvass

2-3 large beets

1/4 cup whey (the clear yellow liquid, separated from the milk solids in yogurt or kefir) or 1 pkg. Vegetable Culture from Body Ecology. Or, double the salt and refrigerate for longer to cut the saltiness.

2 tsp Original Crystal Himalayan salt

2 quart jars

water

Peel and chop beet in 2″ pieces. Place beet chunks in your jars. Add salt and ¼ cup whey (or 1 pkg. Body Ecology Vegetable Culture).

Add enough filtered water to fill the rest of the container, leaving 1″ headroom.

Stir well, cover, and let it sit at room temperature for 3-5 days. Put jars in fridge or cold storage. They will keep there indefinitely (I have kept my cultured beets for 2 years in cold storage, which is not nearly as cool as refrigeration).

Remove from fridge and blend in high-speed blender (with extra water if you prefer it to be thinner).

Enjoy chilled as a drink, mixed with a little bit of fresh lime juice,  or freshly ground pepper. You can use kvass in recipes to replace vinegar.

Drink in small quantities with a meal, to facilitate digestion and build up healthy colonies of good bacteria in your gut. You can drink 8 oz. if you are used to probiotic foods and have a healthy diet. If not, start with just a few ounces and work your way up.

Thanks to reader Christy White for suggesting I write about beet kvass. Christy is a fan of Kristen Bowen’s site livingthegoodlifenaturally.com. Kristen recently wrote about beet kvass, and I have incorporated some of her ideas.

More info about Rejuvelac, part 3 of 3

Question: You said to use quinoa or soft white wheat berries. Can I use hard red wheat? What about other grains?

Answer: At classes I taught in Washington and Oregon right after posting the original Rejuvelac video, I had a few readers tell me they’ve been making Rejuvelac for years, with hard red wheat, triticale, and even rye! One reader told me that Rye Rejuvelac is the best!

I love the idea of rotating our grains, for a variety of nutritional profiles and tastes, just like we rotate our greens.

One reader, Monika, who went to Hippocrates 16 years ago, said she likes Rye Rejuvelac the best as well, and she barely pulses the sprouted grains into the water (per Dr. Max Gerson’s instructions many years ago) to minimize damage and oxidation of the grains. She also uses the sprouted-grain bolus over and over for a week, after straining off the liquid, to drink, after the first 2 days. Then she adds more water, and covers it, and the fermented mass makes more Rejuvelac in 24 hours, over and over, for a whole week. This tip makes the whole process even easier, quicker (about 90 seconds a day!), and less expensive, and it keeps the habitual process going.

Question: I followed your directions, and this stuff smells like #&!$!! Should I still drink it?

Answer: I am cracking up at the thought of so many GSG readers, skirting their new, weird drinky-food, poking it, sniffing it. Like cats. Your anxiety is related to unfamiliarity. (If you hadn’t been raised with bacon cooking on weekend mornings, and hamburgers on the BBQ for dinner, those smells would be unpleasant to you. BTW, they don’t smell good to me.)

I had never sniffed my Rejuvelac, so because we got a handful of this question (I answered it but it’s buried in a couple hundred comments), I made a batch and smelled it. Just for you.

You’re right. IT SMELLS AWFUL. But I tasted it and it was just fine. Luckily, it doesn’t smell at all like it tastes. The predigested proteins and sugars may fizz, and you may smell that process, and the gases that occur, but it’s just a new smell. (Raw sauerkraut, another fermented food, smells bad, too. It tastes good, though.)

Just think, normally that digestion and fermentation has to take place inside you! (Think gas. Think alcohol. Many people have degenerative gut problems, most of them undiagnosed—and they do not digest many foods effectively.) Drinking a probiotic-rich food should quiet your digestion of other foods.

Question: Will my homemade Rejuvelac be alcoholic?

Answer: Only very small amounts of alcohol (like 10% or less of what there is in beer), is produced by the fermentation of grain in Rejuvelac—as is the case with many foods. Your gut produces alcohol as a byproduct of digestion, and if you have candida, or eat a lot of sugar, or both, you’re producing more alcohol in your gut than you’d get from a can of beer anyway. If you have a lot of undigested proteins in your small intestine, as many people on the modern diet do—causing a multitude of inflammatory responses—you will be tremendously benefited by probiotic-rich, fermented foods. So the small amount of alcohol produced naturally with homemade raw probiotic foods is a non-issue, health-wise. And it cannot make you inebriated. In fact, cultured foods will cause your body to produce LESS alcohol.

NOTE FROM ROBYN: Keep in mind that I am learning this new habit, myself. I have been making Rejuvelac only about 6 weeks. I may not have it completely figured out yet and there may be better ways of doing it. For instance, one batch I made, just this week, gave me some intestinal disturbance, even though I never had that at CHI with their Quinoa Rejuvelac. I have read and listened to, with great interest, the comments of those who have been making it for many years. Thank you for any information you have for me—usually I do something for a very long time before I start talking about it here. As I learn more (for instance, if I figure out why a batch had that reaction for me despite it tasting normal), I will share it here.