How the mighty fall! And rise up again. Part 2 of 2.

After drinking bacteria-infested water at his baseball game, Cade took some colloidal silver and Dr. Christopher’s Immune Formula and went to bed.

From my tennis club next morning, I had this text exchange with him. (Text messaging is part of my “drip system” of parenting: say as few words as possible, but make each word count. Repeat messages in different words on different days. Intermittent conversations, texts, and others giving them opinions to back your good ones up!)

Me: How are u feeling, kid?

Cade: I’m terrible.

Me: I am coming home to make u a tonic that will blast those bacteria right outta there.

Cade: That sounds pretty nasty.

Me: Garlic, lemon, ginger, apple cider vinegar, cayenne.

Cade: I’m getting sicker just READING that.

Me: Yes. But u will feel much better much faster and it strengthens ur immune system. U gotta kill those viruses or bacteria before they multiply and cause more problems. All those ingredients kill the bad guys and leave the good guys alone (unlike drugs). Plus–think of your throwing arm–some of those ingredients are great anti-inflammatories too.

Anyway, he was feeling good quickly after drinking the “kinda weird lemonaid,” I called it as I gave it to him a few times that next day. (I had some, too, just for fun. It’s not bad. I blended all those fresh ingredients with a whole apple, and water and ice. Use as much cayenne as you can stand–it amplifies the effects of the other ingredients.) The following day, Cade went to his job all day working as a laborer.

Thanks, readers, for the reminders of quick ways to deliver the knockout punch.

GSG reader Katrina Mayer who is my “facebook friend” wrote this on her wall this week:

“My parents put solar panels on our house in the 70’s. They made me read the labels on everything I ate, drank, or put on my body. They had two organic gardens and a huge compost pile in our backyard. They grew most of our own fruits and vegetables. They taught me about recycling and reusing before it was the “in” thing to do. We never had junk food in the house. And today they drive a Prius. Thanks Mom and Dad! I didn’t appreciate how cool you were until I grew up!”

If you’re doing some of this stuff, your kids will remember it. They may roll their eyes now, but you’re putting roots in them that run deep. Someday, like Katrina, they will follow your example and marvel at your environmental consciousness, your health that is the reason you can enjoy your grandchildren on levels some of your peers can’t, and your general foresight and wisdom.

How the mighty fall! And rise up again. part 1 of 2

Every day the past week I’ve been working on editing the most exciting recipe collection we’ve ever had–right now, it’s a 265-page compilation of my readers’ favorite healthy recipes. With photography, it’s going to probably be TWO VOLUMES of amazing recipes. Main dishes, desserts, breakfasts, sauces, soups, dips, crackers, smoothies, and SO much more. I hope to hand it off to Deb, for the next level of editing, before I leave for Idaho Falls today.

I keep thinking, as I edit, “Ooh, I want to try that one!” Editing is making me HUNGRY! (Being the control freak that I am, I’m editing mostly to make sure there are no ingredients in recipes that I don’t approve of; I’m making substitutions where necessary. Then Deb will take another swipe at language—some of y’all are really chatty as you write directions, LOL!)

One recipe that I’d forgotten about, that I used to make, was that famous old “Lou’s Tonic,” which made an appearance in my life the next day.

I watched part of my 17-y.o. son’s baseball game Mon. night before I had to race off to another child’s team meeting.

He got home at midnight and came in my room to give me the play-by-play of how he pitched the entire game, with 14 strikeouts. He likes to physically act out how some of his more spectacular plays actually LOOKED. And how he’s now hit 90 mph on his fastball, and his curve was really working—“so dirty,” he called it.

(And, update: my former steroid baby is now closing in on 6’4″–I’m so thankful and gratified every time I think about the disastrous direction we were headed, that good nutrition averted.)

He was sitting on my bed holding my hand, and I said, “You’re shaking like a leaf! What’s up?”

He said, “I’m sick! I drank THREE bottles of water out of the cooler in the dugout before someone told me it had been sitting there for 3 weeks.”

The rest of this story tomorrow…..

dentists, and taking antibiotics

Here’s a letter I got recently from a wonderful dentist who reads this blog/site. I won’t give my own response until I hear some of yours. What are your thoughts?

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl:

I think you are pretty conservative and avoid antibiotics, but I had an interesting experience recently in my dental practice that I want to share with you.   You influence a lot of people to make better choices for their health, and if you agree with me and my position as a health care provider and trying to do what is in the best interest of my patients, maybe you can pass this on to your readers.   The AAOS (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons) currently recommends that persons who have had total joint replacements should take one dose of antibiotics one hour prior to high risk dental procedures (not a whole week of antibiotics, just one dose) to avoid bacteremias forming in the artificial joint and causing a systemic infection and possibly failure of the artificial joint.   I had a patient recently who refused to take an antibiotic before a procedure because she avoids taking antibiotics in general.

I contacted her orthopaedic surgeon, and the nurse from his office recommended the same protocol for her, and she still refused.   She walked out of my office informing me there was no way she was going to take the antibiotics and she would find another dentist who would do the work without making her take the antibiotics.   I worry about her health and the risks she is taking.   I also worry about the dentist she finds to treat her without following the standards of care, as his license may be in jeopardy for treating her this way if complications were to arise anytime down the road.

I try to avoid antibiotics whenever I can for myself, but there are times when it may be worth the major complications which could arise.   I am not willing to put my license and my career on the line to treat someone who refuses to follow the written protocols and standards of care for surgeries which they have had done in the past, which now place them in a higher risk category.   I don’t know if you understand what I am saying here, but let me know if you agree or disagree with me.

Taking stock of progress…part 2 of 2

Once upon a time, my whole diet was Ben & Jerry’s, pizza, French bread, Diet Coke, and a fruit or salad mixed in to make myself feel better about it all. I started to change one thing at a time. Sometimes I’d have periods of big progress, and other periods of slight backsliding.

It was almost imperceptible, the forward motion, but now I find my whole kitchen is full of…..

A container of sprouted flax crackers on the counter.

Bags of buckwheat, quinoa, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, oat groats, currants, and homemade sundried tomatoes in the fridge.

Coconut oil and extra-virgin olive oil in my pantry.

Jars of homemade raw sauerkraut in my food storage.

Always a quart or two of kefir growing on the counter.

The top shelf of my fridge full of young Thai coconuts. And pints and quarts of green smoothies.

Today I stopped to take stock and chose NOT to beat myself up because of how long it’s been since I made sourdough whole-grain bread.

Instead, I chose to be blissed out today because (a) I did a perfect headstand for the first time, and (b) my daughter asked me last night if she could have a handful each of pea sprouts and fresh blueberries in the fridge.

(There are lots of things to do WRONG as a mom, and there’s plenty of reminders of that when you’re raising teenagers! But apparently I’ve got some things right, and today I’m going to live in that spot, bask in it. They’ve developed tastes for good food, and I know how to shop for,  grow, cook, and store the good stuff.)

Sometimes when something stressful happens, Kristin and I remind each other, “It’s PERFECT!” This is our code for, “What just happened might not be what you wanted, what you would have chosen. But it generally works out to be better than you think. And it teaches you really cool stuff. Maybe even provides you something you wouldn’t have thought to want. So, it’s PERFECT in its ability to instruct and shape you. At a minimum, it gives you a story to tell and something to laugh at.”

Please, today, congratulate yourself on your progress. Let’s spend today ignoring anything we want to do in the future that isn’t part of our current reality, and just BE. When I’m fully present in my NOW, I’m far happier.

I’m so proud of you for being here, on this journey, to being a better you. To influencing people in subtle and positive ways to raise the bar for themselves. I’m just brimming over with gratitude for PROGRESS! Congratulations on yours–wherever you are in the journey! Feel free to share your own here, today and always.

this is what it looks like when I’m sick

True confession: I got sick on Tuesday. I did yoga and worked out with my tennis team from 8-11 after waking up feeling a little weird and weak. I went home and took colloidal silver, with some powdered Vitamin C mixed in, every few hours. I texted my massage therapist Kortni, who fit me in and worked on my neck/lymphatic system.

In the afternoon I felt a little feverish, so I climbed in bed and slept for a couple of hours. Then I got up and worked at my computer and took care of my kids, feeling about 50%. I watched TV for the first time in a year and slept 8 hours that night (which is 2-3 hours more than normal). I took a big spoonful of my friend Charlene’s Anti-Plague formula before bed, which is raw apple cider vinegar and raw garlic and 8 immune-strengthening herbs. (It’s based on a Dr. Christopher’s formula which you can buy.)

Then I woke up feeling fine and normal the next morning, went to the gym and ran 4 miles.

In my 20’s, I used to get sick a dozen times every winter. I’d go into a dark depression because I couldn’t seem to get healthy. I believe this happened because of MANY rounds of strep throat and antibiotics when I was a child weakening my immune system. Finally when I was 28, I got strep for the last time. I’d been reading a lot, starting into better nutrition, and becoming less enamored of medicine. Also, I was pregnant. So I refused to take antibiotics, and instead took the herb GOLDENSEAL. The strep disappeared quickly and has never returned.

I’ve never had any respiratory problems or sinus infections or bladder or yeast infections, ever—since abandoning the S.A.D. and drug interventions.

So often I hear people say, “I never get sick” as evidence that they are very healthy. I’ve known a number of people who suddenly have Stage 3 cancer even though they rarely got viruses. My point is just that whether or not you’re susceptible to viruses is only ONE measure–not even necessarily the most important measure–of how your immune function or even your overall health is. There are many functions of immunity.

That said….I now get sick about one day, every year or two, and even then I’m totally functional. If that were the ONLY miracle that occurred from our switch to a whole foods, mostly plant-based diet 17 years ago, it would still be one of the best decisions I’ve ever made!

And, your body flushing out with clear, thin mucous when you get a cold or slight fever is a POSITIVE THING. It’s necessary and it builds those immune-function “muscles.” Suppressing a fever is unwise. Read Dr. Robert Mendelssohn (who was a pediatrician and wrote How to Raise a Healthy Child in Spite of Your Doctor) on how utterly rare an out-of-control fever is, and how helpful and necessary it is for the body in resolving the illness.

What ISN’T healthy is when that mucous becomes thick, yellow, green, and/or stagnant. Thick, acidic mucous sitting in your throat, sinuses, and lungs is a breeding ground for infection and cascading problems. Lots of alkaline water, lots of green food, living plant food, and extra REST, are the best enemies of that condition.

A tip from Jacque in Alpine, Utah

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl:

I recently read in a comment that you are looking into gluten free recipes, etc.

I wanted to let you know about this 9 grain bread being sold at Alpine Food Storage. Maybe you’ve already heard about it, but I am really impressed since most of the gluten free alternatives consist of merely rice or potato flour. I was very pleased to look on the label and see words like quinoa, sorghum, amaranth, and buckwheat.

What a great feeling to know you aren’t just taking away gluten, but replacing it with nutrition-packed grains. I think Chirine at Alpine Food Storage does an amazing job finding quality products to supply in bulk and could give you more information. Right now, I think it’s just someone putting ingredients together right out of his home.

I’d love to see more people enjoy this kind of thing, but I hope they can keep the price low. It tastes like whole wheat to me and he even offers some that is not only gluten free but also corn free. For a lot of us who can’t tolerate gluten, most of the products we turn to are corn, which is pretty unhealthy as well. I am trying to minimize my intake of wheat and corn and really appreciate finding a bread recipe that can do that and help supply the grain in our diet. =) Thanks for all you’re doing on here, I love reading through everyone’s stories and ideas.

Jacque: Thanks for this. Many people are suffering with gluten intolerances, and I believe that number will grow, especially as people who are simply undiagnosed become more educated. Desi and I are going to develop a program that is not only gluten-free, but also whole foods.