GreenSmoothieGirl’s weird opinion on soy

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl: Your information about soy is unfortunate, incorrect and not based on science or the latest research or studies!   [Writer then pastes a study out of Harvard on PRNewswire Mar. 28 of this year saying that eating soy nuts and soy protein “may improve many problems associated with metabolic syndrome” in postmenopausal women.]

 

Answer:   I might agree with you if this were the only study I saw.   I would also agree with you if a huge and growing body of evidence comprised of dozens of other studies have not become to be fairly undeniable about the danger of overconsumption of SOY ISOLATES.   In other words, when the soy industry convinced us that its refined products and even waste products were a “health food,” we began to see a shift toward hormonal problems in particular and widespread health effects overall.

 

Google “soy danger” sometime and you can read for hours about another point of view that simply demands to be considered.

 

Using whole soy products in moderation shouldn’t be a problem.   But soy lecithin and protein and many other soy products are ubiquitous in thousands of breads, salad dressings, canned and boxed foods, and so many items in the health food store as well.  Far too much of it in the food supply is causing widespread hormone imbalances.

 

For more information about my digest of research related to soy that requires reconsideration of the “soy as health food” position:

 

www.greensmoothiegirl.com/danger-of-soy-products.html

Storing green smoothies: BPA in plastics [part 1 of 2]

Dear Green SmoothieGirl: What should I store my green smoothie in?   I’ve read that certain chemicals in bottled water and other plastic items leach into my food.

Answer:   A government study by the nonprofit Environmental Working Group (EWG) in Washington, D.C. recently uncovered a surprising (and unnerving) finding.   The plastic lining used by manufacturers of metal food cans have more bisphenol-A (BPA) than plastic containers do.   BPA is an endocrine-disrupting chemical that is linked by research to breast and prostate cancer, diabetes, and neurological problems for babies exposed in utero, among other things.   Cans that test to have the highest BPA levels are chicken soup, infant formula, and canned pastas.   And, the FDA says the average American eats about 17 percent canned foods.   The longer a can sits on the shelf, the more leaching occurs in the food.   And when a container is heated, more chemical is released into the food as well.

What can we do about this?

I believe that eventually the BPA will be removed from cans.   But in the meantime, the first tip is that Eden Foods, a maker of organic items found mostly in health food stores, has BPA-free cans, if you can afford a pricier product.

Second, we can make more of our own food (like soups and beans) and keep cans around for only food storage and emergencies.   Cook the beans you use a lot and freeze them in 2-cup amounts for later use.   Some foods you buy in cans can be purchased in glass jars (spaghetti sauce, for instance).

Third, store your green smoothies in glass pint or quart jars.   I have always done this.   The downside is that if you drop it, glass shatters.   It’s not as convenient as some drink containers for taking in the car and putting in the car’s drink holder, either.   You can obtain stainless steel containers, too.   With either of those options, you will have no chemicals leaching into your food.   And keep in mind that the best way to keep your body removing toxins like BPA from sources we just can’t control is . . . to drink green smoothies.   The insoluble plant fiber in greens mops up several times its own weight in toxins and removes it from the body.

Fourth, you can google “BPA free” and buy baby bottles and other items free of toxic synthetics.  

More tomorrow about what to store green smoothies in, plastics, and the Sheryl Crow email.

take the poll–contribute to OFFICIAL GREEN SMOOTHIE RESEARCH!

Here it is, the official questionnaire, which will tabulate responses and be reported in my upcoming book.   Please take the poll now if you’ve been doing green smoothies for 30 days or longer.   If not, come back when you have!

Answer these questions completely honestly, thoroughly if possible, and THANK YOU in advance for helping advance nutrition science, GSG-style!   I will use your testimonials on the site, in my book, and to encourage others!   I’ll even post some here, LOVE YOU GUYS.

http://www.greensmoothiegirl.com/poll.html

p.s. Sorry I went off the grid for a few days–made a last-minute decisions to run to San Diego for a couple of days while I didn’t have my kids.   Sunny, fun, hiking, relaxing, watching movies, and . . . of course . . . taught my friends there how to make green smoothies, including 10-year old twin boys, who ran around in circles outside yelling, “MY EYESIGHT IS BETTER, MY EYESIGHT IS BETTER!”   I love how literal kids are.

Then I came home and made a pink smoothie for breakfast.   Problem is, I “lent” my ex my BlendTec several months ago and all I’ve had is my VitaMix.   The stupid thing came on for 30 seconds and died.   Permanently.   For no reason.   So I took the blenderful of strawberries and beets and carrots and stuff over to my ex-husband’s house, to see if I could dump it in his BlendTec and get my breakfast that way . . . but he wasn’t home.   When I called him, he informed me that he recalls things differently than I do and the BlendTec is HIS.   Permanently.

Not worth the conflict.   I went to the gym, still hauling around my unblended container full of pink smoothie.   Really hungry now.   After 50 minutes on the Stairmaster, I couldn’t take it any more.    I drove over to BlendTec, all sweaty, walked in and  said, “PLEASE GIVE ME A NEW MACHINE, AND FAST!” and handed over my credit card.

That’s at least the 7th time something has gone wrong with my VitaMix.   Pretty lame when you have to have two machines because it breaks so often.   Does a great job when it works, just wish it always worked.   I’m happy I just got myself another BlendTec.

BUY BLENDTEC.   It’s pretty telling, don’t you think,  that the ONLY thing my  former husband  and I have had conflict over, property-wise, is that BLENDER!

Groundbreaking Green Smoothie Research . . . be a part of it

I want you guys to be thinking about something.

In about two days, I will have an interactive  questionnaire posted on GSG.   Be thinking about what the changes are you have experienced as a result of drinking GS regularly.   The questionnaire will automatically generate tabulations for me to use as research, to be published in The Green Smoothie Rx (or The Green Smoothie Diet . . . depending on the day,  based on my  conversations with the publisher).   (Any opinions on that, the title controversy?)

Be thinking about whether you’ve evangelized, teaching others about this easy, 10-minute step to get 1000% more raw plant food in the daily diet than most Americans are getting.

Be thinking about your chronic conditions or diseases that may have improved as a result of drinking GS.   I cannot and will not make claims about the curative effects, but I can certainly report testimonials and reports from my research.

Thus far, the only GS research out there is Boutenko’s Roseburg Study of only 30 people for 30 days!   I hope to get 1,000 responses (which will be less than 1/3 of my mailing list), so be prepared to be part of this.   At the end of the questionnaire, you’re asked to optionally write a GS testimonial, which will be published with part or all of your name, whatever you choose to give.   (You’re also asked optionally for a 12 Steps to Whole Foods testimonial.)

I am ESPECIALLY INTERESTED in the testimonials of mothers of children!   (But, everyone’s input is highly encouraged and valued.)   I want only those who have been drinking at least a pint, at least three times  a week, for at least a month.

Watch for an upcoming blog and be thinking about even the minor things you may not have noticed since you started drinking kale, collards, and chard after a lifetime of “greens deprivation.”   Thanks in advance for participating!

Food combining for “perfect proteins”

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl:  Do you have any information on what kinds of vegetables need to be eaten together to make a complete protein? Do they need to be eaten at the same time, or just within the same day, so many hours of each other, etc.

 

Answer:  This is an excerpt from Ch. 6 of my e-book 12 Steps to Whole Foods:

 

Most of the main dishes in this chapter are high in protein because I have designed the recipes to contain both a whole grain and a legume.  Together, their amino acids complete each other to make a “perfect protein.”  Recipes in this chapter that contain a grain/legume combination are identified with an asterisk (*), showing that they qualify as a “perfect protein.”  I include the “perfect protein” designations not because I think such food combining is necessary, but because others do and feel better knowing they have it in their main dish.

 

No wonder indigenous people used legumes and grains together for thousands of years—millions of people on this planet have subsisted primarily on the combination of beans and rice.  At dinner, everyone wants energy-sustaining food, and that’s a good way to get it.  However, don’t obsess about the “perfect protein,” feeling that the only true meal must qualify under this banner.  Many experts, including Dr. Robert O. Young, say that if you eat green food, your body has all the amino acids in a free-floating pool to assemble proteins, so you don’t have to eat all of them simultaneously to get enough protein.  The amino acids you eat are used over a 24-hour period, so you needn’t make rocket science of your eating habits.  Just eat lots of plant foods, especially greens. 

 

Because of the way amino acids in plant foods combine, the amount of protein in a legume or grain doesn’t give the whole picture.  Trust your body to manufacture enough protein, even if your food isn’t “quality” protein.  “Quality” only means that it matches human flesh closely, as animal protein does.  The building blocks of proteins are amino acids, and your body can assemble proteins when you give it all the amino acids found in dishes made of a variety of five natural, whole food categories: grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, and vegetables.  If you are imagining these foods being a limited menu, think again: you have a huge variety of highly sustaining foods to choose from!

what enzymes do to make food digestible . . . part 4

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl:   How can enzymes and eating raw food be so important when stomach acid would kill any enzymes that came with the food anyway?

Good one.   Some people think that the low pH of the stomach stops salivary and any other food or supplemental enzymes from working.   A number of experiments Howell writes about show this is not so.   Some enzymes are shown to work actively at two different pH ranges.   Another study shows that salivary and supplemental enzymes were re-activated in the alkaline duodenum and lower in the intestine after going through the stomach.   Hydrochloric acid in the stomach is not as strong as once thought to be and when used in in vitro experiments (outside the body).   A Journal of Nutrition-published study at Northwestern showed 51 percent of amylase from malted barley was intact when passed into the intestine.

Enzymes manufactured by the pancreas of a person or animal are sensitive to pH because they aren’t adapted to anything outside the restrictive confines of the body.   But, microbial-derived dietary supplement enzymes are very adaptive, since fungus grows in a variety of places and conditions.   These enzymes survive the acidity of the lower stomach.   These plant-based sources are the digestive enzyme supplements I prefer (more on that later).

As with so many other things in the human body, we’ve been provided with the ideal environment to digest food.   Problems occur when we alter our food instead of giving our body the kind of nutrition we were designed to digest easily, that people used to eat for thousands of years.

Dr. Howell says that we’re born with a finite ability to produce endogenous enzymes, and by middle age, most of that ability is gone.   (And he said this 25 years ago, before the modern diet worsened.   Some experts make even more dire projections, that Westerners are burning out enzyme capacity by age 35.)   The answer, of course, is to eat as much raw food as possible, and as little cooked or processed food as possible.

Tomorrow, raw meat and dairy.   After that, I’ll address whether you should take a digestive enzyme.