New video: Eat Cancer-Fighting Chocolate Mousse!

Want to learn how chocolate mousse may be part of a cancer-reversal strategy? And by the same logic, a cancer-preventative one too?

In November, I studied with Dr. Lloyd Jenkins, who runs the Budwig Clinic in Malaga Spain, on the southern coast. He is the only doctor endorsed by seven-time Nobel Prize-nominated Dr. Johanna Budwig. She was a genius: a pharmacologist, cancer research scientist, biochemist, and physicist. Read about one of the most practical and high-impact habits Dr. Budwig used, studying at the Budwig Clinic, here on this video…..and/or read my report about it, and the recipe, below the video.

Dr. Budwig was Germany’s Senior Expert for fats and pharmaceutical drugs and came to be considered one of the world’s leading authorities on fats and oils. She wrote about animal studies showing that subjects who ate BAD fats (as most Americans do) greedily consume 5-6 times more food than animals fed a healthy diet with good essential fatty acids. That’s because the body craves more and more, trying to get the essential fats for healthy functioning. Obviously this contributes to our obesity epidemic, which occurs in animals fed bad fats, as well.

Dr. Budwig died ten years ago, at the age of 95, but her contribution to cancer treatment is primarily around her world-renowned studies of essential fatty acids. She collected and analyzed thousands of blood samples, from healthy people and cancer patients. What she found is that cancer patients were ALWAYS deficient in albumin, phosphatides, and one of the essential fatty acids, linoleic acid. Cancer patients all had a greenish-yellow substance in place of healthy red oxygen-carrying hemoglobin. If this continued, the cancer patient lost energy, become increasingly anemic, and died.

She discovered that the combination of a sulphur-based protein (“quark” in Europe—or cottage cheese in the U.S.), blended with linoleic acid in flaxseed oil, solved this problem and allowed patients to heal. The fats in combination recharge the electrical “battery” of cells more than the two separately can do. Dr. Jenkins was insistent that bonding of molecules takes place with a hand-held mixer such as the Cuisinart.

Dr. Budwig claimed to have worked with all kinds of cancer patients over a 50-year period with a 90 percent success rate. I do not personally believe that this kind of success rate would be achieved, in this modern age, with this diet alone (she also advocated for drinking lots of vegetable juice and a very clean diet). We have far more toxins and stressors in the environment than when Dr. Budwig was practicing medicine. However, I found that some European clinics offer this part of the Budwig Diet to their patients for breakfast. It’s worth a try! I’m adding it to my own diet.

Dr. Budwig had her patients first blend:

6 Tbsp. low-fat quark (in the U.S., organic cottage cheese comes the closest; yogurt does not work)

3 Tbsp. flax oil

Now, to add the whole plant food itself, all the nutritious parts of it, including impressive amounts of soluble fiber, add

2 Tbsp. freshly ground flaxseed.

Ideally, use a hand-held blender to mix the first two ingredients. (At the Budwig Clinic, they outfit the apartments patients stay in, with the Cuisinart Smart Stick, so I bought one for $30 on Amazon. But I imagine it’s no deal-breaker to use your Blendtec or Vitamix on low speed.) Using the Smart Stick method, it becomes light and airy. Then, add the sprouted ground flaxseed.

Then add and blend in:

a spoonful of raw cacao

a dropperful of liquid stevia (you can get toffee flavored, or other flavors, at the health food store)

Now you’ve got CHOCOLATE MOUSSE. It’s actually pretty yummy. Make it your dessert and you’ve got your fix—with no actual sugar!—and your essential fatty acids, plus some great fiber, lignans, and many other good things. I think a green smoothie, plus this, makes a great lunch! (You can blend in savory things, like herbs and sundried tomatoes, instead—or mixed berries and honey.)

Remember that the minerals in the greens in your smoothie are absorbed BETTER with some good fats. That lunch, green smoothie, and what I call the Budwig Mousse, is about the right amount of calories, very satisfying, and perfect for someone with a sweet tooth.

This might be confusing since I don’t much advocate for dairy products. They cause inflammation. Cultured dairy foods like cottage cheese are an improvement, and very well may be worthwhile, because the proteins are not only broken down in the fermentation process, but they are also carriers of millions of probiotic organisms that build up a healthy intestinal environment. Dr. Buwig found that when she combined the electron-rich unsaturated flax oil, with cottage cheese, which is rich in sulfur protein, the chemical reaction of the two made the oil water-soluble and easily absorbed into the cell membrane.

Incidentally, the quark/flax oil combination is found at other holistic cancer treatment facilities I have visited, including Klinik Marinus in Germany and Paracelsus al Ronc in Southern Switzerland. But only at the Budwig Clinic have I found a dedication to the entire protocol to Dr. Johanna Budwig, plus additional modalities added as technology and knowledge advances.

Dr. Budwig also advocated strongly for eating unprocessed foods (lots of vegetables) and sunbathing daily. The body stores light energy to power the magnetic properties of the body for increased healing. We are bodies of frequencies, vibrations, and energies! She also felt that 95 percent of us need iodine supplementation.

14 thoughts on “New video: Eat Cancer-Fighting Chocolate Mousse!

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  1. Could you please clarify…in the video you do not show adding ground flax seeds but in the recipe printed below in the blog you blend the cottage cheese and flax oil THEN add ground flax seed? Do you add the ground flax seeds or no? Thanks.

  2. I’ve been eating this delicious recipe for the last couple of weeks, using organic low-fat cottage cheese. Then I saw the comment about carrageenan, Googled it, and found the below article by Dr. Weil. I am so disappointed! Yet another example of not being able to trust what’s in our grocery stores. Robyn, were you aware of the dangers of carrageenan? Maybe you’ve found a brand of cottage cheese without it? If you have, please share!
    http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/QAA401181/Is-Carrageenan-Safe.html

  3. I found a very simple recipe for quark on Hubpages. You simple put a quart of buttermilk in a covered baking dish in your oven overnight at the lowest setting. By morning it should be separated into curds and whey. Strain the whey out and you’ll have quark.

  4. I tried this with the cacao, which was good, then tried it with vanilla extract and the stevia drops – I actually like the vanilla version better. Tried it with the 2 tbls of ground flaxseeds, but it was too thick , so think I will add the ground flaxseed to my morning smoothie of almond milk/banana/blueberries/vanilla yogurt/plain kefir. Thanks for sharing this recipe! Love your videos.

  5. When I lived on the East Coast I had access to fresh, homemade quark from my Amish farmers. I never tried it, however now I am inspired to make it! There is a great little cheese making company on the East Coast that sells the relatively inexpensive culture needed to make quark at home. They also provide the recipe online. It doesn’t look hard at all (if all goes well, I will report back). For those interested in making quark, click on this link: http://www.cheesemaking.com/Quark.html

  6. Must one use the cacao for this to be beneficial? I have heard the cottage cheese and flax oil alone was beneficial. Appreciate your comments.

    1. It sounds to me like it’s the cottage cheese/flax oil that is beneficial, although I’m no expert. I tried the chocolate mousse, and I wasn’t a huge fan. However, when I made it into a “ranch” type of dip with a little bit of salt, dill, parsley, and garlic powder, I loved it!

  7. Dear Robyn, I have been blending flax seeds in my Blendtec and then mixing in raw goats milk kefir before I add all the rest of my smoothie ingredients. Do you think it should be separate? Also should I make sure to use cottage cheese along with kefir? I like raw kefir because of the enzymes. The dessert looks yummy. Thanks for the recipe.

  8. I’m wondering if you have any idea if this would be beneficial for someone with autoimmune issues. We generally avoid dairy because of the inflammation but are trying to boost omega 3s.

  9. I’m confused because in your recipe it calls for 2 Tbs of ground flax seeds to be added after you mix the cottage cheese and flax oil and if you read further down it says the ground flax seeds should be sprouted. So, do the ground flax seeds have to be added and if so are they to be sprouted?

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