Jeanette makes a healthy “black licorice”

My kids asked me, “What is that kid eating?” I told them it was licorice, and then I went home and created it for them.  This is what I came up with and it is SO GOOD! You’ll never want that other stuff that we all grew up eating.

Jeanette’s Licorice

10 very ripe persimmons

10 to 20 anise seeds or several inches of fresh leaves cut

Blend in BlendTec or Vitamix until smooth. Pour a thick layer onto dehydrator teflex sheet and dry overnight or until done at 105 degrees.

Cut in 1-inch thick slices and enjoy like licorice.

Thanks Jeanette!

 

We’re back from the Pacific Northwest! Part 2 of 2

Nona Springer send me this photo from my Portland lecture, with some of the many friends she brought with her, and she wrote this:

I went to Robyn’s last lecture in Portland and loved it.  I talked about 20 friends into coming to this one and they all loved it too.  Not everyone made it into the photo, but it was great fun to have Robyn stand in with us and be part of our excitement.

I have been green-smoothie-ing with my family for over a year and a half now.  We have never been healthier, and we made it through the year without a cold or the flu!  I changed my diet and with daily exercise was able to get off all diabetic and cholesterol medication!

My smoothies are the talk of The LDS Oregon Eugene Mission, and when we get new missionaries in town they come to my house to experience the phenomenon.  My last two children live at home and their college-age friends all come over and ask for green smoothies.  If I’m not home they look in my fridge to see if there’s a pitcher made up they can raid.  Wonderful!

Thank you for what you are doing.  I have been a promoter and demonstrator for the cause for at least a year and a half.  I have convinced many members of my gym to buy high-speed blenders and to make green smoothies.  I have some wonderful stories to share.  God bless you!

Nona Springer
Dallas, Oregon

Back row, left to right:  Judi Lambert, Marian Scadden, Robyn Openshaw, Roselle Mattern, Lynda Spencer, Annette Hurst
Front row, left to right:  Laura Dotson, Nona Springer, Laurel Woodworth, Nancy Rivers

All from Dallas, Oregon (except for Robyn, but we can claim her as an honorary citizen, right?)

Thank you Nona, for being an inspiration to so many people, and for giving me honorary citizenship, I accept! XOXO,

Robyn

update on the Sugar Bet

Do you ever stop and think about the ways karma just flows and flows?

When I was over six months into my year-long Sugar Bet, last February, I confessed that I’d screwed up, when I was in Hawaii.

I came clean immediately when I got home. Not just here on the blog, but I went to Matthew, handed him $1,000 cash, and asked him to let me finish the year. He, on the other hand, was legitimately released from his obligation.

He thought about my request for a WEEK, while I agonized. Then he accepted. He tried to give me the $1,000 back and I said no.

He said he was changing the rules. I got to have three weekend vacations where I could have sugar, for the rest of the year, while I finished it out through Sept. 18. (That’s the full year, plus a week as penalty.)

I did take advantage of that recently—on our trip to Portland, I ate sugar and Kristin was amazed. She said to her brother, “I don’t know who she is! She is usually in constant motion!” She was referring to how I’d lost my energy. I’d fall asleep in the car. I’d say I didn’t want to go out till late.

Sugar does that. It wrecks me. I hadn’t eaten it in a long time, and now I remember why it’s the devil. It trashes my adrenal glands and makes me a lesser version of myself.

I said, “On the rare occasion I eat like other people do, even for a few days, I feel like other people feel. Like, bleh. I don’t like it! I can’t wait to go back home, to juicing and green smoothies and salads and NO SUGAR.”

Anyway, I’m finishing out my year on the Sugar Bet—just one more month. (Actually, I’ve already found another friend to bet $10,000 for another year, more on that later.)

But some people on the blog and facebook took me to task. They said I took advantage of my relationship with Matthew, and that I should have paid him $10,000.

Well here’s the funny thing. Early in the year, I told him to look for a rental property for me. I told him what I wanted and that I was willing to wait.

Shortly before the Sugar Bet ended, Matthew’s realtor partner Drew took me to see a property, and I bought it.

Guess what the realtor’s commission is that I’m paying Matthew?

It’s $10,000.

That feels good, doesn’t it? I have learned to trust karma. I will have a big smile on my face writing that check to Armstrong Flinders and Associates at the closing.

I think we reap what we sow.  I have this card on my corkboard in my office that says, “ MAKE SOMETHING BEAUTIFUL OF YOUR LIFE.” It’s a statement of my belief that this is within my grasp—the ability to take hold of my existence on the planet and make meaning of it.

Ecclesiastes 11:1 says something like, cast your bread upon the waters and after many days it will come back to you.

What’s coming back to you? Good stuff?

As Abraham Lincoln said, folks are about as happy as they have a mind to be. We don’t get everything, but we tend to get out of life what we want most.

We look like what we eat, and what we spend our time doing. If someone bikes 100 miles a week and drinks carrot juice and eats a salad every day for lunch, you can tell. If we drink beer from Thursday to Sunday and eat T-bones and fries and chocolate cake, we look like it.

We have positive relationships if we’re generous, kind, and forgiving. If we laugh a lot, other people laugh when they’re in the room with us.

Examples of karma.

Occasionally bad things happen to good people. The bad guys get away with stuff sometimes. But I believe it evens out in the end. It’s a beautiful phenomenon. The universe’s need for homeostasis creates it.

We’re back from the Pacific Northwest! part 1 of 2

Just back from the Pacific Northwest, where our audience size has doubled each of the three times I have spoken there.

I had Couer d’Alene on the schedule so I could see my grandpa, but he died in May. We went anyway and spoke to nearly 150 of our friends, and then 230 in Seattle and 330 in Portland. Thank you all for coming; I always feel so honored that anyone would come, but especially those who drive a long distance!  Laura and Debbie will be back, the week after Labor Day!

Last year we promised ourselves that next time, we would stop for a few days to learn more about the area. We hung out with my college roommate, Paula, and Kristin’s brother and his wife, Todd and Lori. We went to a music-and-food festival downtown called The Bite.

We ran and biked along the Willamette; hiked in Seaside, Oregon; and picked blueberries in the beautiful Columbia River Gorge with its high waterfalls on Sunday on our way to the airport. In Seaside, the scenery got a lot better the second day we were there, when a whole lotta 6’4” and shirtless showed up for a huge volleyball tournament on the beach. Just as we were leaving.

Kristin and I were blown away by the hydrangeas in bloom everywhere, the easy public transportation, organic everything, and thousands of people on bikes…..we loved everything about Portland.

One morning I ran miles away from the downtown Marriott where we stayed. As I turned around to run back, I realized I was really hungry. Luckily wild blackberry bushes grow everywhere along the river banks and I had an amazing snack of huge, juicy blackberries, even if my arms and legs were covered with scratches.

What an amazing place. We are thinking of moving GreenSmoothieGirl.com there one day. (My only qualm is the lack of sunshine much of the year! But I discovered there are many tennis courts and clubs.) First we have to finish raising some kids here in Utah.

 

Antibiotics and dental surgery….do I agree with taking AB’s preventatively? Part 2 of 2

Answer:

Dr. Larson, I have always appreciated how conscientious you are in your practice, and in your ongoing study to legitimately find the truth. And I think it’s impressive that you stay open minded….plenty of docs wouldn’t even ask me what I think. Like I once did, they trust only peer-reviewed-journal-published clinical trials. Of course, the drug industry INVENTED the clinical trial, which hasn’t ever been tested.

There’s plenty of evidence that should be considered that didn’t go through a multi-million dollar drug trial.

I am aware that occasionally antibiotics may be necessary, in a life-threatening situation. Thank goodness we have them for meningitis!

But I also believe that preventative antibiotics lead to ever-downward-spiraling health problems. I just can’t accept that 20 men on a firing squad are needed to remove a splinter. Just one trained practitioner, with fine instruments, is needed for that. We have lots of natural options that work, outside drugs.

Antibiotics—just one dose!—destroy the vast majority of healthy gut bacteria that is the crux of our immune system. A healthy gut has more organisms flourishing than the entire body has cells! And one round of antibiotic can cause cascading problems for years, even decades. I believe that virtually everyone in North America now has gut issues, and impaired digestion. The reasons?

Number one, antibiotic use. Number two, processed and preserved foods. Number three, genetically modified corn and soy, and hybridized wheat.

I wish that medical professionals would talk about the OTHER side of that issue—the guaranteed health problems that result from antibiotic use—and let the patient decide. That seems fair and right to me, that “professional liability” (CYA) not trump patient best interests to the point that so many of us are just avoiding the medical professional altogether.

I realize none of this is your fault, nor any single practitioner’s. The system has become very broken, where the American tort system has terrified doctors and made malpractice big business.

But I am on the patient advocate side, and I always look at what is best for the whole organism, for the long term. And I know quite a few docs standing up against the codification of medical care to be a monopoly for drug approaches—docs who are so angry that they risk status and even license to “do the right thing.”

I listen to people every day. At my lectures in 50 cities annually, and in emails, facebook, and my blog, people detail the chaos and devastation from their broken immune systems that always starts in the gut.

How do they have a chance, if AB’s are prescribed for just EVERYTHING? The body is never trusted, by the authors of the “standard of care,” to send white blood cells to the rescue and to do its job.

The medical system in the U.S., unlike in Europe and most other parts of the world, absolutely refuses to use natural plant extracts (herbs, essential oils, etc.) to aid and nurture the body’s immune system.

Antibiotics are a good thing only if they’re used once or twice in a lifetime, at most, to deal with an absolute crisis.

Twenty years ago, many who are well educated about the ramifications of AB use were sounding the alarm bell about overuse for ear infections and every cold and flu symptom.  Nobody listened much.

So we’ve gotten worse, rather than changing course. Now we prescribe antibiotics as PREVENTATIVES before every surgery, even dental surgeries. I worked on a mental hospital children’s unit where the kids were given MONTHLY antibiotics as preventatives!

I was told that endodontists would refuse to do a root canal on me, if I didn’t take a preventative AB. So I found an endodontist who didn’t have that policy. Perhaps he was stepping outside “standard of care.”

Or maybe he just looked the other way. (Later this month, I am having the tooth with that root canal, which failed 18 months later, removed. At the time I did not know how toxic the practice of fossilizing a dead tooth is. But now I do.)

Sure, on a rare occasion, there’s an infection that morphs to become something dangerous. But I take issue when doctors are alarmist about a possibility that is one in ten thousand. (That’s how docs got my mother to agree to AB’s every few months when I was a child—by telling them my strep could become scarlet fever.) I consequently spent a lot of my adulthood recovering my broken immune system.

Some of the risks of antibiotics are nearly 100%–yeast overgrowth and devastation of healthy flora in the gut, for instance.

In fact, on a rare occasion, an AB can be fatal too.

Most of the time, the body does its job after an insult like surgery, and the immune system is consequently strengthened.  My biological dentist has natural things to prevent disaster: before my oral surgery, I will have a high-dose IV Vitamin C. Dr. John Augsperger, who hosted my class in Colorado Springs last week, does the same, and he gave me his favorite dental hygiene product, the all-natural Tooth & Gum Tonic by Dental Herb Company.

I LOVE this stuff. No chemicals, alcohol, flavorings, preservatives, sweeteners, chemical poloxsamers or fractionated ingredients. It’s essential oils, herbs, all organic or wildcrafted. It’s the best mouthwash you’ve ever used, gum-disease preventative, and it’s really STRONG, too.

Dr. Augsperger is a biological dentist. I’ve found lots of them who research far beyond what the ADA-controlled dental schools teach, to discover a whole world of different thinking. It’s exciting, it’s empowering, it has lots of innovative solutions….and it’s just way outside “standard of care.”

Outside just dentistry, there are lots of natural antibiotics for child and adult use, that are cell specific and don’t destroy gut flora or healthy cells.  Colloidal silver. Garlic. Herbs like goldenseal.

Antibiotics virtually guarantee yeast overgrowth. They virtually guarantee that viruses and bacterial organisms will bring the whole organism to its knees, over and over, because now its defenses are down.

My friend Ben got a sinus infection and now he’s on antibiotics over and over, I think about 6 times in 2012 already. He has tons of devastating consequences for this vicious cycle, including terrible digestive problems, that many people suffer with now, thanks to our sick love affair with antibiotics.

(Similarly, medicine uses steroids with even more devastating effects on immunity.)

Anyway, Dr. L, this is my opinion and my experience. Since I started refusing antibiotics completely 17 years ago and using alternatives, my family has gotten dramatically healthier, and I’m happier with my arsenal of options, rather than being dependent on pharmaceuticals and waiting to get in to see a doc who, in the end, is kind of a one-trick pony with the prescription pad.

The main one, of course, is to keep them eating a plant-based, high-raw, mostly alkaline diet. Then they’re strong and far less susceptible to the scary stuff.

Your thoughts?

Antibiotics and dental surgery….do I agree with taking AB’s preventatively? Part 1 of 2

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl:

I think you are pretty conservative and avoid antibiotics, but I had an interesting experience recently in my dental practice that I want to share with you.  You influence a lot of people to make better choices for their health, and if you agree with me and my position as a health care provider and trying to do what is in the best interest of my patients, maybe you can pass this on to your readers.

The AAOS (american academy of orthopaedic surgeons) currently recommends that persons who have had total joint replacementsshould take one dose of antibiotics one hour prior to high risk dental procedures (not a whole week of antibiotics, just one dose) to avoid bacteremias forming in the artificial joint and causing a systemic infection and possibly failure of the artificial joint.  I had a patient recently who refused to take an antibiotic before a procedure because she avoids taking antibiotics in general.

Hand holding pillsI contacted her orthopaedic surgeon, and the nurse from his office recommended the same protocol for her, and she still refused.  She walked out of my office informing me there was no way she was going to take the antibiotics and she would find another dentist who would do the work without making her take the antibiotics.  I worry about her health and the risks she is taking.  I also worry about the dentist she finds to treat her without following the standards of care, as his license may be in jeopardy for treating her this way if complications were to arise anytime down the road.

I try to avoid antibiotics whenever I can for myself, but there are times when it may be worth the major complications which could arise.  I am not willing to put my license and my career on the line to treat someone who refuses to follow the written protocols and standards of care for surgeries which they have had done in the past, which now place them in a higher risk category.  I don’t know if you understand what I am saying here, but let me know if you agree or disagree with me.

Sincerely,

Dr. G.L.