A FISH STORY: the food, and the oil supplements

The debate over fish, and fish oil, is to me one of the most interesting ones in nutrition in its complexity. We have to ferret out, from the debate, the sophisticated marketing of the fish industry, which capitalized on emerging data 15 years ago that red meat is bad for us. (But fish is good for us, they clamored—and scrambled to provide “data” that this is so.)

Then we must evaluate the sources of fish, in a planet where virtually every waterway is highly contaminated and fish retain mercury at high levels off the coast of every continent. (Canned tuna is one of the most high-mercury foods you can find. I recommend you eliminate it from your diet.)

Then we have to look at farmed fish—even more problematic because they are fed ground-up fish pellets, made of guts and skin and bones. (Also chicken feces and genetically modified corn, soy, and canola oil.) These fish products, then, actually containconcentrated environmental pollutants.

Farmed fish is well documented to be higher in PCBs, dioxins, and other carcinogenic chemicals than wild fish. Most of the fish consumed by humans is now raised in farms. Wild “free range” fish eat plenty of toxins, too—but not concentrated in “fish pellets” like on the farms. Fish in farms are fed chemicals to make them pink rather than their natural grey color, are low in Omega 3’s due to their lack of a natural diet, and are given antibiotics at a higher rate than any other livestock!

And we have to look at the nonsense about fish oil. Does it really prevent heart disease? Everyone accepted this quickly as “settled science” mostly because a few data points were being repeated by so many doctors and so many supplement companies. But now we have 20 years of data and those who look at longitudinal trends know that fish oil has saved us from nothing.

What if a fish died and was floating in the water? Would you eat that fish’s flesh, or squeeze oil from it to eat, even 12 hours later? Of course you wouldn’t. It would be rancid. So says Dr. Brian Clement, N.M.D. and PhD, with whom I spoke in Orlando and Ft. Lauderdale. What if it sat for days, and then you deodorized and purified it, highly refined it, put it in gelatin capsules, and put it into distribution so it sat another several months before you ate it?

You’ve noticed that you burp up rancid fish oil taste for hours after you take yours? Rancid oils are carcinogens. The pharmaceutical companies that produce the vast majority of the fish-oil pills will pacify you by saying, “But we deodorize the oil.” Ah, so they use petroleum products, like coal tar, to mask the rancidity. I ask again, do you want to refine a fish-oil product and cover up the obvious signs that it is putrefied and not appropriate as food?

This is not an effective way to get Omega 3 fatty acids in your diet. Especially when there are perfect plant-food sources that don’t cause you to burp up rancid nasty.

Flax, chia, and hemp seeds are fabulous sources of Omega 3 fatty acids. I recommend having all three on hand. I love sprouted flaxseed to add to green smoothies. (I know of 28 anti-cancer compounds in flax. And this product is sprouted, which increases not only fiber, but also explodes vitamin and mineral content. Flax has 7x more lignans than the next-highest source—these compounds are highly breast-cancer protective.)

You get no fiber in your rancid fish oil caps. I really don’t think it’s a good source for anyone, of Omega 3’s. Save your money and eat some good whole foods instead:  greens have Omega 3’s in small but highly bio-available amounts.

And chia, flax, and hemp are perfect green smoothie ingredients, but I eat them in lots of ways:  roll raw cookies in them or put them in baked products. I love chia drinks from the health food store (one variety of Synergy kombucha is full of it). A spoonful of chia seed at night, chewed well and swallowed, and chased with a big glass of water, will fill up your stomach and get rid of your hunger.

 

Become a modern-day hunter-gatherer! Dr. Wahls beats M.S. with nutrition!

I love this TedTalk by Dr. Terry Wahls, M.D., great data and slides about how she reversed multiple sclerosis. She talks about how she was wheelchair-bound with MS and on many drugs, and is now a healthy mom and doctor. She became a “modern-day hunter-gatherer,” because indiginous people’s diets exceed our RDAs by 200% to 1000%. Check out the chart in her slide show showing the percentage of Americans deficient in each nutrient. The top two answers were OMEGA 3 (85%) and IODINE (80%!). We’re also highly deficient in calcium, magnesium, and B vitamins. Dr. Wahls undertook to address her nutritional deficiencies, which over the course of just a few months got her out of the reclining wheelchair and onto a bike, eventually completely regaining her life.

Daily, she eats 3 cups green leaves (dinner plate), 3 cups sulfur-rich colorful vegs (broccoli, cauliflower, onion, garlic, mushrooms, asparagus, many more), 3 cups  colorful high-antioxidant fruits and vegs—yes, 9 cups! Also wild fish and organ meats and grass fed meat, seaweed foods. Now she has dedicated her life to teaching others about the benefits of the hunter-gatherer diet and doing clinical trials to document its effects.

That doesn’t sound yummy to you? Destroying my myelin sheaths and losing the ability to walk, and feed myself, doesn’t sound yummy to me. More and more of us have these kinds of dire futures if we don’t stop eating what you see in the photo with the family of four: a week’s worth of their food, which is almost entirely processed.

Tomorrow we will talk about Dr. Brian Clement’s teaching about whether fish oil is really a good source of Omega 3. (Hint: as I’ve said in my books and speaking, fish is highly problematic both as a food and as a supplement. We’ll talk about WHY, but fish in clean water is difficult if not impossible to find.)

Sign this petition against Monsanto

I would like to get behind any movement against the actions of monolith Monsanto. I believe the actions of this company, whose agenda is insidious, is damaging the health of virtually every American. It controls seeds, harms small farmers, genetically modifies our crops and breeds pesticides into seeds and sterilizes them, and repeatedly hybridizes crops….all to our detriment.

Please sign this petition against Monsanto. Small farmers just lost against the powerful giant company. We need to be like Europe and ban Monsanto’s practices. I have known people with severe gluten reactions who go to Europe, where they do not indulge GMO food, and they have no problems. I’ve also known Europeans who do fine eating even white bread in their country, who come here and suffer with terrible gastric disturbances eating our food, until they go home.

Also I’ve been asked for the link to the photoshopped image of me eating a burger and fries and a mug of beer. Check it out HERE. Lots of people post on the GSG facebook page, so scroll down to Mar. 2.

beautiful and young at age 70! three ageless examples show the value of good nutrition!

I often hear people judging the raw vegan movement, or its credibility as a lifestyle, because a particular raw vegan doesn’t look good.  In fact, it is often debilitating health conditions that started the person on the path to raw/vegan in the first place. So they may have a long way to travel out of the health/beauty morass they were in from a lifetime of eating the S.A.D.

It’s also confusing to newbies when people are overweight and say they eat raw or vegetarian. This leads me to believe they maybe aren’t practicing what they preach.  Or maybe they eat tons of nuts, seeds, fruit, and cold-pressed oils—and few of the low-calorie options that make a plant-based diet so healthful, like greens, vegetables, fruits, legumes. Greens and vegetables have to be the crux of a life-giving diet.

Or maybe they eat late at night, or they have no “off” switch. I don’t know. There’s a certain famous raw foodist who is beloved by many people, but who is extremely overweight. It’s not great role model stuff—so confusing for people—but it is possible to be overweight eating raw. Possible….but unlikely!

So don’t judge the folks who just got started last year. Take a look at these 3 women who are all about 70 years old. This first one of Annette Larkin, sent to me by my friend Ben, is ASTONISHING—check out what happens from the time you’re my age (45) till you’re 70, you eat all raw food. WOW!!!

(For a baseline of what she WOULD look like, just compare her to her husband, who has continued on the S.A.D. and looks and feels every bit of his 70+ years.)

And there’s Mimi Kirk, voted world’s sexiest vegetarian, who is over 70.

And there’s Donna Gates, author, who is about 65. She’s known for teaching about fermented, probiotic-rich foods and lots of sea vegetables are part of her diet. Long ago she was totally debilitated by candida.

I’m inspired. Are you?

It’s green smoothies for me till Jesus comes!

I thought you’d get a kick out of this short-but sweet email we just got from a reader:

Dear GreenSmoothieGirl: I’ve been doing green smoothies for one month, and I’m never going back….it’s GREEN SMOOTHIES for me till Jesus comes!

—Patty

Amen sistah.

On Friday 3/2, my friends Drew and Matthew posted a photo-shopped image of me drinking a mug of beer and eating a giant burger and fries. I have a large midsection and a shirt where I am nearly busting my buttons.

I think they were in their real estate office rolling around on the ground laughing hysterically from all the chicanery. You can see it on my personal page, where I read him the riot act. Later Drew noticed there are 300% more readers on my GSG page, so he posted it there too.  It’s not particularly believable with the giant man-hand holding the beer doesn’t really “go.”

This reminds me of the day my high-school friend Chuck posted a photo of me circa 1983 in my McDonald’s uniform, working  the drive-thru. Unfortunately THAT photo was real.

One time I went to In N Out Burger because my kids asked me to get their dad a gift certificate there for his birthday. Other than that, good luck getting a photo of me with a burger.