Dr. Lodi on camera, OASIS part 10 of 13

 

Here’s my first video with Dr. Lodi, and I’ll post another one tomorrow.

I asked Dr. Lodi his success rate relative to allopathic stats and he said, “70% or 80% leave here with no cancer or very little cancer. But the 5-yr. marker is the telling statistic.” And it is very difficult for holistic clinics to know if patients who leave actually follow the nutritional protocol. Following the protocols taught by Lodi and other nutrition-focused approaches isn’t easy because it involves bucking cultural norms.

It may involve going against family traditions without the support of people close to you, if they don’t understand what you’re doing. You have to be a strong and committed person. It helps if you’re educated WHY you’re eating no sugar, no meat and dairy, and all raw plant foods.

But as Dr. Lodi said, and I’m paraphrasing: The thing that got rid of the cancer is also the thing that prevents cancer from coming back. If the lung cancer patient leaves and starts smoking again three months later, how can those statistics mean anything when the cancer returns?

It sounds crazy to say that some people would rather have junk food than their life. So I won’t say it. I believe that part of the problem is that people aren’t educated to realize that people who eat lots of sugar and excesses of protein are far more likely to get cancer. It takes a significant amount of focus and learning to be educated enough to understand the critical link between dietary choices and cancer.

Because most oncologists “play dumb” on that issue, patients are highly confused. (I say they “play dumb” because they “light up” cancer by feeding it glucose and then doing PET scans, so they know full well that sugar is the food of cancer. Why virtually none of them tell their patients to STOP feeding their cancer sugar, I can’t understand.)

A woman who lives a few blocks from me had a late-stage thyroid cancer a few years ago. Two years ago, after becoming weary from her medical treatment (she has to cover her tracheotomy with her finger to speak), she turned to a vegetable-juice diet. It sounds like the Gerson Therapy. I’ve not interviewed her yet; I just know her story from a friend of mine I served on the Planning Commission with of our town, years ago. This woman, Linda, is now healthy and fit, two years after beginning the diet.

Another woman in the same neighborhood was subsequently diagnosed with cancer. She went to her oncologist and he instructed her to go learn what Linda had done, and do it!

That’s great, but here’s my question. Why isn’t the doctor learning about it himself, and putting it into practice? If it works, and they can see it working right in front of their eyes, why aren’t docs ordering the books on Amazon, reading it as fast as they can, and getting life-saving info into the hands of as many of their patients as they can, every day?

5 thoughts on “Dr. Lodi on camera, OASIS part 10 of 13

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  1. Hi Robyn: Dr. Lodi says that people see cancer as an attack on the body and so they go to war against it. He instead sees sees cancer as the body’s way of maintaining homeostatis (sp?) Does he mean that cancer is the way the body is telling us that something is wrong in the way we are treating it? Could you explain this a bit more? Debbie

    1. I think he means that cancer occurs when the body loses homeostatis because it has to fight lots of war in the Dept. of Maintenance, and then he says Dept of Defense gets neglected.

  2. You’re quote: “. . .they ‘light up’ cancer by feeding it glucose and then doing PET scans, so they know full well that sugar is the food of cancer.”

    That was exactly what I thought when I had my first PET/CT scan. I’ll give you my opinion on why they “play dumb.” Some years back I talked to a doctor and his wife (who was my supervisor at the time) about a product that was helping people. I’ll paraphrase what they told me: Referrals are their “bread and butter” and if they started doing anything about actually using alternative therapies they’d lose their credibility with the [allopathic] medical community and the referrals would dry up and their income would dry up with it.

    In other words, these doctors have spent thousands of dollars and millions of hours to become doctors and then find that their ladder is leaning against the wrong tree, but they don’t have the courage to do something different. Often, the threat is real. Look at the case of Dr. Stanley Bryzynski (not sure of spelling). He has had the FDA breathing down his neck, trying with all the weight of the government to close him down because he has had the audacity to come up with his alternative (and effective) cancer treatment.

    Keep up the good work that you are doing, Robyn. You are a light to many of us.

    Warmly,

    Gloria

    1. Gloria, you’re exactly right. Any M.D. who steps outside the mainstream to offer alternatives to drugs instantly becomes a pariah in his community of doctors. Not only that, but the modalities he would offer aren’t covered by insurance, and that’s the “bread and butter.” It’s guaranteed humiliation and decreased status AND income for them. Easier to just look the other way. Tom Lodi just happens to not care what other docs think.

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