Creative Health Institute, part 3 of 5

Here’s a video of Ed and me. He makes a living selling processed food, and he came to CHI because his mom paid for it and told him to go. He had no idea what he was getting himself into. I told him, “That’s because if she told you about the wheat grass implant, you wouldn’t have agreed!” He acknowledged this is likely the reason. That said, he’s glad he did.

I’m always looking for easy preventative nutrition habits that enrich my life and keep me well. I have MANY years of spreading my message, raising my kids, spoiling grand- and great-grandchildren, seeing the world, and tennis, biking, and skiing left to do! My takeaways, from CHI, for my permanent lifestyle so I look and act as young as Madeleine 23 years from now? Two new things:

First, I am going to add Rejuvelac to my habits. My first batch is just finished and sitting on the counter. It’s so easy, extremely inexpensive, and a habit I’ve decided is worth my time. Soak a cup of soft white wheat berries (or quinoa) in water overnight. Rinse and drain it twice a day, covered, for 2 days. Blend it with 8 cups water and let it sit, covered with a tea towel or in a jar with a mesh lid, several days. Then refrigerate it in jars and drink 2 glasses a day. I was a little afraid of it at CHI, but the taste isn’t strong and I acclimated quickly.

Madeleine had a fabulous idea that I use it instead of water in the base of my green smoothies. I might as well—it’ll put probiotics in the smoothie and my kids won’t even notice.

Second, I’m going to start rebounding again. I have a rebounder in my bedroom that I haven’t used in a long time. It’s so incredibly great to move lymph fluids–nothing else really compares. The lymph system is something we take for granted and rarely talk or think about, but if your blood delivers the groceries, the lymph system takes out the garbage. Even a few minutes a day is helpful, and add some lymphatic massage and EFT tapping during that same few minutes.

You’re wondering about this “wheat grass implant” business. It seems foreign at first, and some of the people at my session had NO idea what they were getting themselves into. The three-bag enema cleans anything out of your colon, and then you put 8 oz. of wheat grass into your colon with the enema bag. Best if you can KEEP it in. It is powerfully detoxifying, and it travels that rectal vein very quickly to the liver and cleanses it and opens the ducts for that all-important release of many toxins directly into the colon for elimination. This is a tough one to add to an everyday routine, but a week of wheat-grass juice implants, once a year, is a powerful preventative.

Tomorrow I’ll talk about people I met at CHI and how they’ve impacted my life and studies.

7 thoughts on “Creative Health Institute, part 3 of 5

Leave a Comment
  1. I really like the idea of adding the Rejuvelac as my green smoothie base, but I’m honestly totally freaked out to leave something perishable on my countertop in an unsealed container for several days. What are the chances that “bad bacteria” get in there and make me sick? I really appreciate any feedback you have. It sounds like a great opportunity to make green smoothies do even more for me, but I can’t get over the initial concept. Thanks!

    1. Well, Grace, I think it might help if I explain the concept a bit more. Fermented foods are part of your diet already, if you eat yogurt or sauerkraut, or even beer. The manufacturer had to let it sit at room temperature for a time, to grow the cultures.

      It’s a modern concept that everything we eat has to be sterilized—ancient peoples lived amongst billions of organisms very peacefully for thousands of years. So, it feels unnatural to you but only because we’ve gotten away from eating foods that nurture our gut’s need for healthy colonization. Just ONE course of antibiotics can change that internal terrain forever. Every culture of the world eats cultured foods. Some chew up a food and spit it, with their saliva, into an earthen pot, and drink it a week later. (I won’t be teaching you those methods, don’t worry.) There are literally hundreds of types of cultured foods, in traditional / indigenous peoples, and in people who have not completely adopted processed diets. (The most complete and well known work on this concept is Sally Fallon’s Nourishing Traditions, which has some good info but advocates for lots of meat and dairy and a very rich diet. My 12 Steps to Whole Foods program deals with it in a condensed way in Ch. 8 and uses what I feel are a do-able, moderate amount of probiotic foods that do not require us to purchase $10/lb. animal parts. My work focuses on culturing vegetables, optionally some raw, antibiotic- and hormone-free milk, OR coconut liquid.)

      My blog on 9/15 talks about learning vicariously through others—the examples I gave were learning from others’ health disasters. But you can learn from my health victories, too. Does it help you to know that I have had a quart or a half gallon of raw kefir, or yogurt, or coconut kefir, or sprouts, or Rejuvelac, or sauerkraut, on my counter, pretty much every day of my life for the past 17 years? We have had zero instances of problems, illness, food poisoning.

      It also helps if you understand the process. You can preserve foods a few ways. One, drying it to dramatically slow oxidation. Two, killing all its lifeforce (enzymes and vitamins) so that there’s very little to oxidize, and then sealing it against air and bacteria (canning). Third, utilizing lactobacillus and other beneficial organisms and lactic acid to break down the proteins and preserve the food. The way I make sauerkraut is that the unrefined salt preserves it for a few days while the (slower) lactic acid begins to take over. I have two-year old raw sauerkraut (that I preserved with whey from my yogurt/kefir) that has been unsealed (but covered tightly with a lid) that we are still eating. It’s too soft, and it’s better texture-wise at six months old. But it’s preserved, and the healthy bacteria help my family stay healthy.

      It might help to address the semantics. The word “fermented” has a negative connotation. (Although beer drinkers who woudn’t be caught dead eating fermented vegetables drink PLENTY of fermentation.) When you think of fermented, do you think of ROTTEN? We aren’t eating any rotten foods at my house. We could mentally replace that word with a much nicer one: cultured!

      So, don’t eat fermented foods. Eat cultured ones!

      My Rejuvelac ferments in a day. At CHI, they told me 3-5 days, but mine is plenty tart 24 hours after I blend the sprouts and water, and put it on the counter to grow (aka ferment, aka culture).

    1. You’re ahead of me, Tammie, right on! There was some controversy about Rejuvelac that I studied about 15 years ago, but I think it’s a habit that makes sense.

Leave a Reply