Radio chat with Carol–and more book illustrations

Great fun with Carol Tuttle on her radio show last night, listen to the recording HERE. At the end of it, she said, “It’ll be fun to keep connecting with you and see how this goes. Maybe we could play tennis sometime! But I think you might beat me.”

I said: “I plan to.”

LOL! Gotta love Type 3’s, right Carol?

 

Finally, here are the next 4 illustrated pages of my book, The Adventures of Junk Food Dude.

Dressing Your Truth

Local author Carol Tuttle contacted me several months ago. She’s author of four books, including “Discover Your Personal Beauty Profile” and “Remembering Wholeness.”

She asked me to meet her for lunch. She said she knew exactly what I am in her typing system to help you choose clothes, hair, and makeup to “dress your truth.”

I direct you to this because I believe this program allows you to live more truthfully, more grounded in your energy, personality, and unique way of operating in the world. It’s about far more than shopping-and-makeup (which are NOT generally interests of mine, and I explain why in my interview).

I let Carol’s team do a makeover on me! Check my interview out where I don’t quite seem myself:

Check out Carol’s program and sign up HERE

Not only did I arrive dressed completely as a Type 2 (I’m Type 3), but you won’t know me, I was so nervous! (Losing all control and letting a team of people cut and color my hair, put makeup on me, and dress me–in a word, SCARY!) In the initial interview–not only am I jittery, but I didn’t sleep well in anticipation, so I have bags under my eyes!

And here’s my makeover:

Check out Carol’s program and sign up HERE–I think you’ll enjoy it! In fact, you might get LOST in the web site, watching the transformation of many women “discovering their truth.”

Also, I’ll be on her radio show tonight, Sept. 20, at 7 p.m., talking about wholeness in nutrition and health–and wholeness in Carol’s world of truth, beauty, and fashion!

Log in HERE to either listen live (call in to ask me a question, and I’ll give away a few of my books)–or listen to a recording if you’ve missed it by the time you read this.

The Adventures of Junk Food Dude, illustrated

I’m just back from a 24-mi. Saturday bike ride in the beautiful Heber Valley, with GSGs Nicole and Angie. Nicole taught me about a “farmer blow.” (You don’t want to know. It’s for when you’re biking in the cold and don’t have a tissue. Don’t ride downwind of her, is all I’m sayin. Just teasing, Nicole–riding in your draft is awesome!) A flock of cranes, a flock of hot air balloons, the most beautiful red-and-orange scenery, made me whoop out loud.

I wanted to show off that my children’s nutrition book is well on its way to being illustrated. I’m so excited! Through the use of a narrative, children learn about not just principles of good basic nutrition, but they also learn their choices have power and impact in their own and others’ lives.

Lori Sume illustrated big posters announcing my four children’s births, that are framed and have been hanging on their bedroom walls their whole lives. She’s so gifted with art for this age group, 3 to 10.

So I just had to share some of the first pages with you. What do you think? Pre-order here for autographed copies when it comes out.

one of my favorite weekend breakfasts, pumpkin waffles

So my Breakfast class at the Zermatt Resort last week was great fun. Just one strange thing, I discovered after class when I went to sample the food: the chef apparently made my Pumpkin Waffles . . . without pumpkin!

Weird. But my newsletter with these recipes went out, and one reader immediately went out to find canned pumpkin and said “crop damage” means no canned pumpkin right now. Maybe that’s why! (I keep it in my food storage, so I didn’t know.) If you can’t get it in the store, hang onto this recipe, perfect for fall. Or used cooked pureed carrots, or your own winter squash or pumpkin, baked, outer peel removed, pureed.

Anyway, we love these dense, delicious waffles with raw applesauce from the apples coming out of our tree now (see the photo below of Tennyson picking them), and a little real maple syrup.

To redeem myself, here’s the recipe. It makes a big batch so you have leftovers, which you can freeze if you want.

Remember (read Ch. 9 all about this) that if you soak the liquids in the grains overnight, you neutralize phytic acids that may bind to minerals, making them unavailable to you. You also break down the proteins, making grains easier to digest.

PUMPKIN WAFFLES

2 cups whole-wheat flour (finely ground, soft white is my favorite for this)

2 cups regular rolled oats

1 (30 oz.) can pumpkin

¼ cup coconut oil (liquid)

3 Tbsp. Sucanat or unrefined coconut sugar

2 tsp. cinnamon

1 tsp. nutmeg

1 tsp. sea salt

1 ½ tsp. baking powder (no aluminum), reduce by ½ tsp. if you soaked grains overnight

1 cup yogurt or kefir

2 ½ cups water

2 tsp. vanilla

3 eggs (organic, free range) or 3 Tbsp. chia soaked in 9 Tbsp. water

Mix rolled oats in your high-power blender to break them down to a coarse meal. Mix the whole-wheat flour, oats, yogurt, and water together, then cover and let sit overnight (optionally). In the morning, add the remaining ingredients and mix by hand, but don’t overmix. Batter is dense, and baking time usually must be longer than waffle timer indicates. Top with Quick Raw Applesauce or plain yogurt, and real maple syrup.

Quick Raw Applesauce

4 large Jonathan or Fuji apples, washed/cored/quartered

1 cup water

1/3 cup lemon juice

2 tsp. cinnamon

½ tsp. nutmeg

1/3 cup (or more, to taste) maple syrup

Pulse all ingredients in high-power blender for a chunky sauce.

Does it help to visualize? Hit The Cycle!

GSG reader Alisa sent me her meditation CD for evaluation, and I was listening to it this morning. Over the sound of ocean waves, it says in a million ways, “I am choosing habits to lead me to my slender, healthy body NOW.”

Do you think it makes a difference to imagine positive outcomes in your life?

My son Kincade is a junior in high school. Today against Lehi High School, he hits a single, a double, and a triple. At Kincade’s last at-bat, Scooter Nelson says: “You gonna hit The Cycle, Cade?”

The Cycle is legendary in baseball. It’s happened ONCE this year in MLB. It never happened on the Thunder, the outstanding traveling baseball team Cade played on for 4 years before high school, coached by Dennis Smith, one of the best men to ever walk Planet Earth.

So Cade walks up to the plate with Scooter’s words ringing in his ears. On the first pitch, he smashes the ball 40 feet over the center-field fence.

The Cycle is a single, double, triple, and home run. See our celebratory photo after the game, below.

Every player comes out to body-slam Cade as he rolls into home plate, and Coach Nelson, of 4 state baseball championships, says, “That was psycho stuff,” and gives Cade the game ball.

He is batting 900 in his first three games of the fall, and he had 7 RBI’s tonight, winning a game against a very tough team.

How much does VISUALIZING positive outcomes matter? Imagine yourself healthy, with energy to spare, doing stuff you maybe haven’t done in a decade or more. It can happen. Not magically, but because actions start with thoughts–consistent ones that you nurture.

My 17 y.o. baseball player is the sickly, underweight, chronically wheezing kid taking five courses of steroids in his second year of life. The one whose story I tell on the site and in my latest book. Whose life did a 180 when we started eating whole foods and quit eating dairy, meat, and sugar.

[Oh, and what IS that shirt you’re wearing, you ask? I got grease all over my favorite white t-shirt and ripped a hole in it, extricating it from my bike chain today. So I let my two youngest kids “decorate” me with a bag full of Sharpie markers. Then I went to the gym in a tank top and everyone pointed out the Sharpie bleed-through all over my shoulders. BEING A MOM IS FUN!]

Change is good . . . or at least inevitable (part 2 of 2)

I once gave up another new sport I’d fallen in love with, kickboxing, when I peeled a tendon off my shoulder bone hitting the bag too hard. For 9 months, I couldn’t do the things I loved. Just like now. A friend of mine just invited me to do a 10-hour hike this Saturday and I had to say no, because of the injury.

Change happens. It’s not that it’s good or bad, although I think most change is a crucible that leads to growth. If we let it be.

It helps to quantify the changes and why the differences inspire and enhance my life. From tennis and running, to cycling? I now have different legs than I had before–biker legs instead of tennis legs. I like them. I liked my tennis legs, but the different, evolving muscle shape is awesome now too. I also get to be outside enjoying the most beautiful scenery in the world.

I went biking Saturday with my friend Kristin, and on the downhill she said, “This is like therapy!” I said, “I know! Sometimes when I’m up here, I start laughing, because it’s all so beautiful it blows my mind. And sometimes I pray. I say, ‘God, thank you for this!'”

And I feel thankful that change–something bad, actually–threw me into these discoveries and metamorphoses that feel like they are “meant to be.”

So why do we resist change so much? It’s scary, I know.

I watch so many people making the shift from the standard American diet, to the whole-foods, mostly raw program that I teach. And I see their reluctance, their fears, their excuses, in the beginning. I see their challenges and hurdles, their small successes, their building excitement, their health improvements and weight loss.

Change we have no control over, that seems bad at the outset, often leads us somewhere good.

Through my divorce, I gained or rekindled two new hobbies/skills (tennis and skiing), new friends, a lot of self-awareness, learning and growth–and it frankly made me a better parent. Because of plantar fasciitis, I’m now spending lots of time biking the beautiful Provo and American Fork Canyons in 20- to 50-mile rides.

Through my son’s illness, I changed my entire family’s health, with nutrition, and wrote books and developed this site to share with others.

Change has cost me a LOT of effort and angst, but it’s made me so much better.

So why don’t we make change that we know is going somewhere good, more often? I wish I could convince everyone to eat whole foods with me. I know sick kids whose parents won’t make dietary changes–because they fear change.

“I won’t get to eat foods I like.” “I won’t know what to make.” “I’m sure it’s too expensive.” “My family won’t support me.” Just some of the excuses to avoid change. I’ve heard from hundreds of people with those complaints, who took a leap of faith, and ended up with glow and energy and chronic conditions reversed.

I am learning to be a person who embraces change and sees the challenge and promise in it. Come with me.