Newsletter Sign-Up

Get Robyn's green smoothie
recipe free!


food for extraordinary health!

simple . affordable . delicious

Independence Day, part 1 of 2

Here are photos after my family’s annual 5K run at Provo’s Freedom Festival.

Runners in the photo are my dad, my son Cade, my brother Ben, my sister Betsy, and her husband Matt. (And my mom, who walked.)

Also here’s a random photo of my bro-in-law Matt and me doing a fashion shoot using my mom’s stylin’ bathrobes. (I went in her closet for a coverup because it was chilly after the race. My bro Ben said, “You’ve gone from cold to old.” Matt would like me to write that he is NOT pregnant–it’s the shape of the robe, not him.)

The race, on asphalt, exacerbated this horrific case of plantar fasciitis I’ve developed. On facebook, readers suggested these things that I am now trying: massage, Strassburg Sock at night, ice it, barefoot running, wearing shoes with supports in the house. I just gave up running, tennis, and Zumba for now, in favor of biking, Stairmaster, and weightlifting (ugh).

Anyone else get rid of it? If so, what did you do??

I ran it 5 minutes faster than I did 5 years ago. I beat everyone but Ben and my 16 year old son who has legs “up to here.” I’ve never beat my dad until this year. It’s fun to run with him because he talks about everything he sees as we go along (so, you have to turn your iPod down to chat with him). He turned 67 last month and guess what he did on his birthday. He ran 4 miles, just like he does every day!

My grandmother used to say, “It’s not what you do now and then, that will save or kill you–it’s what you do every day.” I believe my extended family’s excellent health is because of two things. First, the example we had and habit we formed of eating a primarily plant-based diet. Second, the example we had of being physically active. Breaking a sweat every day.

One of the most enduring memories I have of my dad is when I’d get up at 5 a.m. to practice the piano and go to seminary. He’d come home from his paper routes and his run, before work as an Air Force Lt. Colonel, Defense Intelligent Agent in the Pentagon.

I remember it well because he’d always want to talk: he’s Seinfeld’s infamous “close talker” and I have a sizeable “personal space” bubble. He’s the biggest patriot I know–a Vietnam veteran with a huge American flag cemented in his front yard. He’s one of those people who does the right thing, day after day, consistently. He’s my hero. In fact, I think I’ll tell a little story about him tomorrow.

Here are photos after my family’s annual 5K run at Provo’s Freedom Festival.

Runners in the photo are my dad, my son Cade, my brother Ben, my sister Betsy, and her husband Matt. (And my mom, who walked.)

Also here’s a random photo of my bro-in-law Matt and me doing a fashion shoot using my mom’s stylin’ bathrobes. (I went in her closet for a coverup because it was chilly after the race. My bro Ben said, “You’ve gone from cold to old.” Matt would like me to write that he is NOT pregnant–it’s the shape of the robe, not him.)

The race, on asphalt, exacerbated this horrific case of plantar fasciitis I’ve developed. On facebook, readers suggested these things that I am now trying: massage, Strassburg Sock at night, ice it, barefoot running, wearing shoes with supports in the house. I just gave up running, tennis, and Zumba for now, in favor of biking, Stairmaster, and weightlifting (ugh).

Anyone else get rid of it? If so, what did you do??

I ran it 5 minutes faster than I did 5 years ago. I beat everyone but Ben and my 16 year old son who has legs “up to here.” I’ve never beat my dad until this year. It’s fun to run with him because he talks about everything he sees as we go along (so, you have to turn your iPod down to chat with him). He turned 67 last month and guess what he did on his birthday. He ran 4 miles,  just like he does every day!

My grandmother used to say, “It’s not what you do now and then, that will save or kill you–it’s what you do every day.” I believe my extended family’s excellent health is because of two things. First, the example we had and habit we formed of eating a primarily plant-based diet. Second, the example we had of being physically active. Breaking a sweat every day.

One of the most enduring memories I have of my dad is when I’d get up at 5 a.m. to practice the piano and go to seminary. He’d come home from his paper routes and his run, before work as an Air Force Lt. Colonel, Defense Intelligent Agent in the Pentagon.

I remember it well because he’d always want to talk: he’s Seinfeld’s infamous “close talker” and I have a sizeable “personal space” bubble.   He’s the biggest patriot I know–a Vietnam veteran with a huge American flag cemented in his front yard. He’s one of those people who does the right thing, day after day, consistently. He’s my hero. In fact, I think I’ll tell a little story about him tomorrow.

Tags: , , , ,