Independence Day, part 1 of 2

Here are photos after my family’s annual 5K run at Provo’s Freedom Festival.

Runners in the photo are my dad, my son Cade, my brother Ben, my sister Betsy, and her husband Matt. (And my mom, who walked.)

Also here’s a random photo of my bro-in-law Matt and me doing a fashion shoot using my mom’s stylin’ bathrobes. (I went in her closet for a coverup because it was chilly after the race. My bro Ben said, “You’ve gone from cold to old.” Matt would like me to write that he is NOT pregnant–it’s the shape of the robe, not him.)

The race, on asphalt, exacerbated this horrific case of plantar fasciitis I’ve developed. On facebook, readers suggested these things that I am now trying: massage, Strassburg Sock at night, ice it, barefoot running, wearing shoes with supports in the house. I just gave up running, tennis, and Zumba for now, in favor of biking, Stairmaster, and weightlifting (ugh).

Anyone else get rid of it? If so, what did you do??

I ran it 5 minutes faster than I did 5 years ago. I beat everyone but Ben and my 16 year old son who has legs “up to here.” I’ve never beat my dad until this year. It’s fun to run with him because he talks about everything he sees as we go along (so, you have to turn your iPod down to chat with him). He turned 67 last month and guess what he did on his birthday. He ran 4 miles, just like he does every day!

My grandmother used to say, “It’s not what you do now and then, that will save or kill you–it’s what you do every day.” I believe my extended family’s excellent health is because of two things. First, the example we had and habit we formed of eating a primarily plant-based diet. Second, the example we had of being physically active. Breaking a sweat every day.

One of the most enduring memories I have of my dad is when I’d get up at 5 a.m. to practice the piano and go to seminary. He’d come home from his paper routes and his run, before work as an Air Force Lt. Colonel, Defense Intelligent Agent in the Pentagon.

I remember it well because he’d always want to talk: he’s Seinfeld’s infamous “close talker” and I have a sizeable “personal space” bubble. He’s the biggest patriot I know–a Vietnam veteran with a huge American flag cemented in his front yard. He’s one of those people who does the right thing, day after day, consistently. He’s my hero. In fact, I think I’ll tell a little story about him tomorrow.

Here are photos after my family’s annual 5K run at Provo’s Freedom Festival.

Runners in the photo are my dad, my son Cade, my brother Ben, my sister Betsy, and her husband Matt. (And my mom, who walked.)

Also here’s a random photo of my bro-in-law Matt and me doing a fashion shoot using my mom’s stylin’ bathrobes. (I went in her closet for a coverup because it was chilly after the race. My bro Ben said, “You’ve gone from cold to old.” Matt would like me to write that he is NOT pregnant–it’s the shape of the robe, not him.)

The race, on asphalt, exacerbated this horrific case of plantar fasciitis I’ve developed. On facebook, readers suggested these things that I am now trying: massage, Strassburg Sock at night, ice it, barefoot running, wearing shoes with supports in the house. I just gave up running, tennis, and Zumba for now, in favor of biking, Stairmaster, and weightlifting (ugh).

Anyone else get rid of it? If so, what did you do??

I ran it 5 minutes faster than I did 5 years ago. I beat everyone but Ben and my 16 year old son who has legs “up to here.” I’ve never beat my dad until this year. It’s fun to run with him because he talks about everything he sees as we go along (so, you have to turn your iPod down to chat with him). He turned 67 last month and guess what he did on his birthday. He ran 4 miles,  just like he does every day!

My grandmother used to say, “It’s not what you do now and then, that will save or kill you–it’s what you do every day.” I believe my extended family’s excellent health is because of two things. First, the example we had and habit we formed of eating a primarily plant-based diet. Second, the example we had of being physically active. Breaking a sweat every day.

One of the most enduring memories I have of my dad is when I’d get up at 5 a.m. to practice the piano and go to seminary. He’d come home from his paper routes and his run, before work as an Air Force Lt. Colonel, Defense Intelligent Agent in the Pentagon.

I remember it well because he’d always want to talk: he’s Seinfeld’s infamous “close talker” and I have a sizeable “personal space” bubble.   He’s the biggest patriot I know–a Vietnam veteran with a huge American flag cemented in his front yard. He’s one of those people who does the right thing, day after day, consistently. He’s my hero. In fact, I think I’ll tell a little story about him tomorrow.

14 thoughts on “Independence Day, part 1 of 2

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  1. I had a problem a few years ago with my feet too, and what really helped was doing exercises in bed before I even stepped out. The doc told me to “write the alphabet in cursive” with each foot before I got out of bed. It is really a foot workout!

  2. What an awesome family tradition! I am kind of like the pioneer of health in our family. I want to leave a legacy of health for generations to come. The dis-ease mentality has to stop somewhere and I want my children, grandchildren, and so on to be achievers in their health, not victims. 🙂

  3. On recommendation of my podiatrist, wearing arch supports in my shoes, not going bare foot for long periods, and pulling my toes towards my knees several times BEFORE getting out of bed in the morning has greatly reduced my PF flair ups. I did receive one cortisone shot in my left foot, but not the right one, though, now I wish I hadn’t had that shot. My right does just as well as the left – even two years later! Hope your feet feel better soon…it’s a terrible condition!

  4. Thank you for your wonderful website! So, your foot or feet issue. I have seen many patients whose plantar fascia problems developed because of a toxicity issue and/or connective tissue weakness itself. It is commonly both with the toxicity weakening the tissue and making the pain worse and easier to trigger. Feel free to contact me and i will see if any of this might be the cause of your problems.

  5. Robyn,

    Congrats, great run. I have had plantar fasciitis and so has my wife. If you ask a podiatrist, they will tell you to get custom orthotics. I told you about this book before, but if you do any running at all, you have to read the book “Born To Run” by Christopher McDougall. You will love the running part of the book, and you will also love what he writes about diet and nutrition–totally goes along with what you do. From that book, I learned to take my feet out of “feet coffins” (shoes) and strengthen the muscles in the bottom of my feet. I do a little barefoot running, I go without shoes around the house whenever I can, and I don’t buy expensive running shoes with big huge heals and cushion everywhere. I am a total believer in this and it has totally helped me.

    Also, I do triathlons, and I just did the Echo Tri a couple of weeks ago without using a single GU or energy drink or stimulant. The olympic distance race took me just under 3 hours to complete, and I fueled up with green smoothie in the morning before the race, then had green smoothie in my bottle on the bike, and felt good enough to finish the run without taking any supplements. If you have ever done a triathlon, GU’s are considered essential to having the energy to finish a race. So I used to race before I changed to a plant-based diet, and I can’t imagine ever going back. My digestive system would be a mess on a long training run or for a race. Many people take immodium or other products to get through a race. I don’t have to do that. I feel great going into a race. Biggest difference for me though, is how I feel after a race. I am tired and hungry, but not exhausted and waisted. I’m rarely sore, and feel like I’m ready to run again the next day.

    If you have any suggestions on what to put in a green smoothie that will be used during a bike ride, let me know. I have to keep it pretty simple for easy digestion, but I’ve been doing a little spinach, a couple of bananas, maybe some strawberries, some orange juice, and chia seeds.

    1. Garon, I’m on it–I will order and read the book! Thanks, great stuff. I have planned to do some barefoot running, too, now that I’m back from my 2 wk. history trip. Congrats on your inspiring successes!

  6. Garon Larsen ,

    Since you mentioned about your plantar fasciitis, I would like to share about my heel spur..

    I also had plantar fasciitis, which also is called , Heel Spurs. I also had bone spur in my throat. The Dr. said that was caused from a car accident I was in over 40yrs ago !

    I had a cordazone (sp?) shot in my heel, that I did not agree too, besides being very painful, and not good for anyones body..

    Yes, the pain went away for about 8 months. Then the pain came back, and I could barely walk again.

    I was NOT going back to that Dr. as he wanted to give me another shot!

    Looking through the net, I found “Acid-A-Cal” which is a vitamin cap. (best price was Amazon)..It was not expensive, and got reviews that it took away heel spurs!

    I took it for about 6 weeks, and not as much as they recomended.

    I have No heel pain, and the bone spur in my throat is gone also..

    I stopped taking it after the 6 to 8 weeks.

    Its been over 8 months now, No pain…

    Take Care,

    Annie

  7. Robyn:

    I have a bad case of plantar fascitis and I am currently getting treatment from a chiropractor that uses the Graston technique which seems to be helping alot. You need to find a chiropractic that uses this technique to stretch out that tendon on both the foot and lower leg.

    Jennifer

  8. Hey Robyn,

    You should find a reflexologist to work the reflex points of your hands and feet. I have several clients who have had this awful pain of plantar fasciitis and me working on them has helped the condition.

    It’s non-evasive and isn’t some craziness of injecting something into the bottom of your feet. It will just help relax your body and let it do what it is suppose to do….heal itself.

    Many Blessings,

    Becky

    1. Becky, I will look into that. I’ve always wanted to learn about reflexology anyway. Don’t worry–I’m not injecting ANYTHING into my foot! Thanks for the tip.

  9. Hi Robyn,

    I developed plantars fascitis after we moved. Carrying heavy boxes up and down stairs did not agree with my feet. I friend taught me simple exercises that I did every morning for a few months, which have helped to strengthen my feet. One is lifting a marble with your toes repeatedly. Another is scrunching a towel across the floor toward you. Flexing and scrunching the feet before getting out of bed helps. I also bought a pair of Mephisto sandals, which I adore. Whenever my feet start to hurt, I wear those for a day and they are fine again. This blog thread is the first time I’ve heard that going barefoot would help. For me, it makes my feet hurt more to go barefoot for too long. It took my feet several months to heal, but now they are much better. I also express a lot of gratitude for my feet now and I think that positive energy makes a difference. You’re an inspiration, Robyn!

  10. Hi Robyn

    Hi Robyn

    I love my green smoothies and reading your web site.

    What I found very helpful with my plantar fascitis was rolling a golf ball under my foot. I would do this whenever I could. I also went to massage and had her massage my foot. Very uncomfortable but it helped. I also wore briken stock sandals all the time. Hope this helps.

    I have a nutriently question as well. I am a vegetarian and I include some diary in my diet. Is it better to take a b 12 vitamin on its own or a multiply b vitamin.

    Thanks Colleen

    1. Colleen, I don’t know. You may be just fine with your B12 levels if you include aloe vera in your green smoothies, eat garden produce, and/or use nutritional yeast. I have read a number of statistics that show more meat eaters to be B12 deficient than vegetarians. I don’t think the data is conclusive, but I also think panic over the B12 issue is totally unwarranted.

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