New Yorkers are nice, and GSG.com just tells the truth

My daughter and I just had a big laugh this morning. She fulfills book orders for me of The Green Smoothies Diet. If you get the book, you’ll see her 14-y.o. handwriting on your package (but the autograph is mine, LOL!).

She just walked into my office and said, “That lady who asked for two free books because she’d already bought 12 Steps and then bought a blender, is so nice! We didn’t hear back from her so I didn’t send her the books, but a month has gone by and her email, reminding us, is so nice. I thought New Yorkers were mean, but she isn’t!”

I said, “Yeah, she is, and plenty of New Yorkers are very nice. And actually, people everywhere who read our site are actually THE BEST, even when we screw something up.” (I love that my daughter gets to do customer service and learn that people are lovely all over the world.)

But then I remembered a notable exception and told my daughter. A woman took the nutrition quiz on the site, which admittedly has a high bar. If you haven’t taken it, here you go:

http://greensmoothiegirl.com/get-healthy/quiz/

Those on my site who are already well down the path of getting away from the S.A.D. do well on it. Those who are newbies but feeling good about the fact that they are making a first step or two–quitting the coffee habit, starting green smoothies after a lifetime of S.A.D.–are sometimes frustrated by it. Sometimes they want to be told they get an “A” for those first steps.

But one woman wrote me recently and screamed, “I eat better than my co-workers and I got an F on your quiz! AN F!!! Fix your stupid quiz!” Well, I wrote her back a nice email. She wrote a week later and said, “I just looked at your quiz again and you haven’t changed anything! F*** YOU, GREENSMOOTHIEGIRL!”

Anyway, Emma and I ROFLOBO. That’s internet/text-speak for Rolled On The Floor Laughing Our Butts Off. (It’s the nice Mormon version of the more standard ROFLMAO.)

Please don’t have your feelings hurt because my bar is high here. Don’t slash your wrists if you get a bad score on the GSG quiz. We’ve strayed so far from good nutrition like billions of indigenous people have eaten for thousands of years, that the comparison (like what’s on my quiz) can be SHOCKING. If knowing what a phenomenal, disease-preventing diet looks like will upset you, please DON’T take the quiz and just start with Step 1 and enjoy the journey.

If I gave my college students an A for high-school writing, no one would try to write outstanding upper-division papers worthy of an elite business school at an outstanding university. That’s where you are if you’re reading this blog/site: I’m teaching you elite nutrition–on a budget for busy people.

I could certainly tell you a bunch of raw-food sites to go to, where the bar is HIGHER.

But this is, in fact, a high-bar kinda place. If I could find a way to TRUTHFULLY tell you that much of anything about the Standard American Diet is good, I would! You’d certainly love me more. (Ditto letting my kids sit around here watching TV without responsibilities–they’d think I’m nice, and fun, but my parenting would be lousy! It’s not going to happen.)

I’m going to just tell you the truth here at GSG. Unvarnished and plain though it may be.

raw food: here’s what’s in my dehydrator right now

You know I love my dehydrator, especially this time of year when I’ve got so much stuff coming out of the garden that I don’t want to go to waste. Right now I have all 9 trays full in my dehydrator with two recipes contributed by readers. (I love y’all! Thanks for your ideas and support of each other!)

Tonya’s cheesy kale chips are filling four trays and they are INCREDIBLE, hard to believe how much nutrition you’re getting just snacking. I just took them out and ate a bunch of them while I wrote this. Just press one side of your leaves of kale in the “sauce.” Doubling the recipe will fill your 9 trays.

Here’s my recommendation on the site, if you don’t have a dehydrator yet and want more info (plus one of my recipes for flax crackers): http://www.greensmoothiegirl.com/robyn-recommendations/dehydrators/

Tara C. gives this tip for using those baseball-bat sized zucchinis in the garden and I’ve got 4 trays of zucchini moons almost dry–just tried one, and I like them. Super easy

! Silly Dilly Zucchini Moons

Slice zucchini in half length-wise.

Scoop out inner core of seeds.

Turn over and slice thinly (about 3/8-inch thick).

Spread on dehydrator trays and sprinkle with dill. Dehydrate until crispy.

Enjoy plain or with a yummy, dilly dip.

Now that I’ve removed the kale chips, I’m going to use up the big boxful of cherry tomatoes my son hauled in yesterday, with this idea also from Tara C.:

Cheery Cherry Pizza Snacks

(My kids say these taste like mini-pizzas.)

Slice cherry tomatoes in half, toss with pizza seasoning (I get it from Azure Standard) and dry till crisp. Enjoy!

(Tara would like suggestions to improve on this idea.)

Here’s Tara’s last idea, which I’ll try next:

Gingered Zucchini Bites

Slice zucchini as above. Before dehydrating, soak for 30-60 minutes in pineapple juice mixed with 3 tablespoons grated fresh ginger, 1/2 cup agave, and a dash of cinnamon. Dry in dehydrator until crispy. These look lovely in your pantry stored in Mason jars with a little raffia tied on top–pretty enough to give away!

This morning at 5:30 a.m., I made some pesto from the basil, spinach, and tomatoes in my garden. See your Jump-Start collection on the site for that recipe–whole-grain pasta with pesto is one of my kids’ favorites. Then I made a variation on that, some zucchini pesto with barely steamed zucchini, basil, kelp, cayenne, walnuts, sea salt, olive oil, mustard seed, and Bragg’s. I put these two types of pesto in pint jars, labelled them, and froze them. I think I’ll share a pint with a few friends this weekend.

What to do when your kids go into the “real world”

In 2008, after being married for 20 years, I found myself a newly single parent.  I was on my own trying to achieve a high-raw diet for my four athletes in elementary and middle school.

At their dad’s home, my children get a salad with dinner, but also sugar cereal, Top Ramen, junk-food snacks, meat for dinner, and . . . no more green smoothies.

What’s a mom to do?  I know many of you have similar questions, because I get them filling my Inbox.

Some of my kids are asking for good nutrition on their own. My two daughters are vegetarians by choice and ask their dad if they can come to my house when he makes hamburgers. My healthiest child begs for Brussels sprouts and steams them after school for a snack. And all the kids notice they don’t like how they feel, eating junk at his house.  But others of my children will eat junk whenever they get the chance.

These are a few tips if you or a parent you care about is dealing with this or a similar situation.  Because even if divorce isn’t part of your life, your kids may go to the in-laws’ or grandparents’ home and encounter a set of standards different than yours.

–Make sure your kids leave for school (or for their dad’s or grandparents’ house) with excellent nutrition up until that point.

–Let go and know that after all you can do, God takes you the rest of the way.  You don’t have to be perfect, you just have to do the best you can.  My mom always said that she sent her eight children out into the world and said a prayer after us when we walked out the door.  Control the things that you can, that feel right to you, and let go of the rest.  It’s like my yoga teacher says: I’m going to show you ways to push your body outside its comfort zone, but do you what you can and call it good.

That’s not to say, of course, that we dive-bomb into junk food hell.  If you ever needed good nutrition, you need it most in crisis.  You can’t control the emotional devastation of many of the trials that confront you in life.  But one thing you can control, with a bit of effort, is how you treat your body.

Don’t let nutrition and exercise be the first things to go.  Keep up the standards you can reasonably achieve and you’ll feel so much better, traversing the tough times.

To Your Health,

–Robyn Openshaw

p.s.  If the only habit you maintain through your kids living apart from you part of the time is a green smoothie, you’re still nutritionally far ahead of 99 percent of Americans.  Remember that even a pint of green smoothie is 7.5 servings of greens and fruit!

What to do when your kids go into the “real world”

In 2008, after being married for 20 years, I found myself a newly single parent.   I was on my own trying to achieve a high-raw diet for my four athletes in elementary and middle school.

At their dad’s home, my children get a salad with dinner, but also sugar cereal, Top Ramen, junk-food snacks, meat for dinner, and . . . no more green smoothies.

What’s a mom to do?   I know many of you have similar questions, because I get them filling my Inbox.

Some of my kids are asking for good nutrition on their own. My two daughters are vegetarians by choice and ask their dad if they can come to my house when he makes hamburgers. My healthiest child begs for Brussels sprouts and steams them after school for a snack. And all the kids notice they don’t like how they feel, eating junk at his house.   But others of my children will eat junk whenever they get the chance.

These are a few tips if you or a parent you care about is dealing with this or a similar situation.   Because even if divorce isn’t part of your life, your kids may go to the in-laws’ or grandparents’ home and encounter a set of standards different than yours.

–Make sure your kids leave for school (or for their dad’s or grandparents’ house) with excellent nutrition up until that point.

–Let go and know that after all you can do, God takes you the rest of the way.   You don’t have to be perfect, you just have to do the best you can.   My mom always said that she sent her eight children out into the world and said a prayer after us when we walked out the door.   Control the things that you can, that feel right to you, and let go of the rest.   It’s like my yoga teacher says: I’m going to show you ways to push your body outside its comfort zone, but do you what you can and call it good.

That’s not to say, of course, that we dive-bomb into junk food hell.   If you ever needed good nutrition, you need it most in crisis.   You can’t control the emotional devastation of many of the trials that confront you in life.   But one thing you can control, with a bit of effort, is how you treat your body.

Don’t let nutrition and exercise be the first things to go.   Keep up the standards you can reasonably achieve and you’ll feel so much better, traversing the tough times.

To Your Health,

–Robyn Openshaw

p.s.   If the only habit you maintain through your kids living apart from you part of the time is a green smoothie, you’re still nutritionally far ahead of 99 percent of Americans.   Remember that even a pint of green smoothie is 7.5 servings of greens and fruit!

What to do when your kids go into the “real world”

In 2008, after being married for 20 years, I found myself a newly single parent.   I was on my own trying to achieve a high-raw diet for my four athletes in elementary and middle school.

At their dad’s home, my children get a salad with dinner, but also sugar cereal, Top Ramen, junk-food snacks, meat for dinner, and . . . no more green smoothies.

What’s a mom to do?   I know many of you have similar questions, because I get them filling my Inbox.

Some of my kids are asking for good nutrition on their own. My two daughters are vegetarians by choice and ask their dad if they can come to my house when he makes hamburgers. My healthiest child begs for Brussels sprouts and steams them after school for a snack. And all the kids notice they don’t like how they feel, eating junk at his house.   But others of my children will eat junk whenever they get the chance.

These are a few tips if you or a parent you care about is dealing with this or a similar situation.   Because even if divorce isn’t part of your life, your kids may go to the in-laws’ or grandparents’ home and encounter a set of standards different than yours.

 

–Make sure your kids leave for school (or for their dad’s or grandparents’ house) with excellent nutrition up until that point.

 

–Let go and know that after all you can do, God takes you the rest of the way.   You don’t have to be perfect, you just have to do the best you can.   My mom always said that she sent her eight children out into the world and said a prayer after us when we walked out the door.   Control the things that you can, that feel right to you, and let go of the rest.   It’s like my yoga teacher says: I’m going to show you ways to push your body outside its comfort zone, but do you what you can and call it good.

That’s not to say, of course, that we dive-bomb into junk food hell.   If you ever needed good nutrition, you need it most in crisis.   You can’t control the emotional devastation of many of the trials that confront you in life.   But one thing you can control, with a bit of effort, is how you treat your body.

Don’t let nutrition and exercise be the first things to go.   Keep up the standards you can reasonably achieve and you’ll feel so much better, traversing the tough times.

To Your Health,

–Robyn Openshaw

p.s.   If the only habit you maintain through your kids living apart from you part of the time is a green smoothie, you’re still nutritionally far ahead of 99 percent of Americans.   Remember that even a pint of green smoothie is 7.5 servings of greens and fruit!