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thoughts after Educ. Wk.: they’re teaching baloney (literally) part 3 of 5

So I went to the lady’s class and learned two interesting facts that I shared with you yesterday.   But that’s where the useful information ended.

 

I was hoping for some good tips since I’ve spent quite a bit of time assembling an arsenal of good information and great expert speakers for my upcoming 6-part teleseminar on Developing a High-Nutrition Food Storage.

 

Imagine my shock to spend an hour in this class on stocking a healthy pantry, and never hear any of these three important words: Vegetable (with one exception you’ll love, later in this paragraph). Fruit. Whole.   Not even any talk of grains or legumes. What I did hear was advice to stash things like creamed soup (full of MSG), Otis Spunkmaier cookie dough, cake mixes, canned anchovies, and “Krab” meat.   A long discussion of whether to freeze your meatloaf before or after you cook it.   Instructions to blanch all your veggies before freezing them to stop the enzymatic action.   The teacher laughing about how she never uses her oven because she adores her microwave so much.   A tip about a wonderful taco salad she eats often, full of chips, cheese, and hamburger meat.   A suggestion to use your canned chickpeas to make hummus, and don’t bother going to the health food store for tahini (raw sesame seed paste)–just use sour cream instead!

 

I could write paragraphs on each of these pieces of COMPLETELY BOGUS ADVICE.

 

The teacher put mypyramid.gov up on the screen, the U.S. government’s dietary guidelines.   She said this:

 

“Recently a man asked me, ‘Is there a better way to eat than the American diet? Like the Mediterranean diet, for instance?’”   The teacher pointed at the government’s pyramid, which prominently features meat and dairy and ignores raw plant food, and said this:

 

“I told him, ‘No.   This is more research based than anything in the world. It is the best diet anywhere.’”

 

I was astonished.   I got a book out to read until class was over, writing her off as being a rather ignorant grandma who was recruited to teach the class maybe because she was willing and maybe has a very organized year’s supply of food.   But then she mentioned being single and living alone, and a few minutes later mentioned, “When I was getting my PhD . . .”

 

PhD!   I put my book away.   Please, please, I thought to myself, don’t let her PhD have anything to do with nutrition.   Hundreds of people are sitting in this class learning falsehood from her.   Please, please tell me she is not influencing young people, the parents of the future, every semester on this campus.

 

I quickly flipped to the back of my Education Week magazine to learn her credentials, and this is what it said: “Association professor and dietetics program, director in nutrition, dietetics, and food sciences.”

 

So what did I do then?   I’ll tell you tomorrow.

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