Naturally Leavened Bread Made with Kamut

12 Stepper Darlene in Canada sent me these gorgeous photos of the whole-grain, 100% naturally leavened bread she made with Kamut rather than wheat, for her gluten-intolerant daughter.

Hope this inspires those of you working on Ch. 9 of 12 Steps to Whole Foods, or thinking about doing so!   I will tell you that Darlene’s bread looks better than mine!


Leavened bread - 1

Leavened bread - 2

9 thoughts on “Naturally Leavened Bread Made with Kamut

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  1. I recently made sourdough bread with Kamut and it is wonderful. The sourdough love it. However there is gluten in it, so maybe she meant her wheat intolerant daughter? That bread looks good!

  2. looks wonderful–kamut is controversial for it’s gluten content right now–but maybe her DD is wheat intolerant?

    does that mean that the starter from jim is safe for celiacs? (not grown on dairy or gluten grain? do you know?) thanks!

  3. Darlene, that looks like wonderful bread. Is it moist? I have never baked or cooked with spelt. Spelt has higher protein than wheat, doesn’t it? If I will be giving up meat, I must find something that is comparable in protein.

    Robyn, I have a question about the “bread starter.” BTW, that link doesn’t work for me. Did it work for all everyone else? Maybe it’s just my computer. Anyway, if we make our own starter, will it be bad for us, or not as nutritious? Or is it just more convenient to order a starter? I started one using freshly ground whole white wheat and warm water.

    Thanks to you Robyn and every one else who contributes to my understanding of raw whole food cooking. I’m excited about this adventure and want to make it a lifetime practice. My husband has cancer and I had it 17 years ago, so you can see its importance in our lives. Again thanks.

  4. I fixed the link and noted the date (June 8) of the blog entry on free sourdough starter.

    MarLou, you can make your own starter too! Welcome!

    Yes, I think she meant wheat intolerant. Thanks. Disclaimer: Kamut has some gluten. Some gluten-intolerant folks do okay with it, but not all. True celiacs probably will not!


  5. Darlene, your bread looks wonderful! It’s making me hungry just looking at it. Can you share the recipe that you used, please! I have never been a good bread maker, but I would love to try your bread recipe. Was it easy?

  6. I already posted this in the 12 step blog but I copied it here in response to the recipe question from Katie.

    There are only a few other 12 step blog entries about making sourdough bread and I think they mostly referred to the challenges and so I was very tentative about my results. It was truly astonishing that my first batch turned out so well. Since that time, I have made several batches and it looks the same every time.

    I spent quite some time working with my starter when I activated it. I started it off on soft white wheat, then spelt, and then kamut. It became a kitchen pet as I watched how it responded to different flours and other conditions. When I felt confident that it was doubling between feedings on a regular basis, I baked my first loaf.

    I dreamt of making my own sourdough bread for over a year now – when I first saw the recipe in Robyn’s collection – but I had so many health problems that I couldn’t actually complete the process. I finally got strong enough and tried it. In the meantime, I did all kinds of research. I found two sites to be very helpful. The first one supplies a vast amount of information on the trials and tribulations of baking bread. I followed the protocol on baking whole grain sourdough bread as laid out there.

    I wanted to bake bread that my whole family could enjoy and was quite excited when I found a recipe for 100% spelt or kamut.

    The results speak for themselves. Here is the recipe I used:

    Spelt or Kamut Sourdough Bread

    4 cups active starter

    2 tablespoons olive oil

    1 cup water

    2 teaspoons sea salt

    6 cups spelt or kamut flour

    I also added a couple of tablespoons of honey

    I used the process as laid out in the first link mentioned above because it called for longer resting times which enhance the sourdough flavour.

    Then I found a pita bread recipe that turned out perfectly!! I used the dough recipe from above but followed the baking procedure in the following link. Wow!

    That’s my bread story!


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