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The Essential GreenSmoothieGirl Library . . . part 3

Sorry I’ve been MIA (I somehow got locked out of my own blog, and my webmaster was off celebrating Diwali)!   Before we move on to more of my favorite books, announcements: tomorrow is the LAST DAY to order raw almonds in the group buy.   You must have your check postmarked tomorrow, Oct. 30.   To answer the two most common questions, yes, the nuts are shelled, and they will arrive to you mid-November.

So, three more of my “top shelf” nutrition  books, with the links to pick them up on Amazon if you like:

Dr. Joel Furhman’s Eat to Live contains excellent data about a plant-based diet versus meat and processed foods from a courageous medical doctor willing to recommend vegetarian lifestyle changes instead of drugs and surgeries.   The books contain a limited number of simple recipes at the end.   Possibly because many of Furhman’s patients are cardiac patients, he is preoccupied with “low fat” in Eat to Live, which I think unnecessary and even possibly harmful for  some people, but it’s a small criticism of a great book.

 

John Robbins’ The Food Revolution (as well as his earlier work Diet for a New America), a pivotal book with a compassionate voice for the Earth, the animals we abuse raising them for food, and the people of the planet.   The son of Baskin Robbins’ founder, John abandoned his destiny to teach people instead about the virtues of a plant-based diet, and you will be forever changed by reading his book that comprehensively documents why we should eat lower on the food chain.   The author is precise with data, and he covers all the data points comprehensively, from cancer and heart disease risk, to genetically modified foods, to global warming, to animal cruelty.

 

Mike Anderson’s The Rave Diet & Lifestyle is fun and fairly quick to read, because it pulls no punches.   It’s hard hitting and unapologetic in its promotion of the plant-based diet.   It’s jam-packed with information (that duplicates Robbins, Fuhrman, and Campbell), well written, and contains lots of easy recipes at the end.   My only slight quibble with Anderson (and Fuhrman) is that I don’t think people in normal weight ranges need to be afraid of fats, the kind found in nuts, seeds, and unprocessed oils.

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