why is everyone’s hair thinning? . . . part 1 of 3

Hugs and thanks and prayers back, for peace for you, everyone who commented on my last blog (and all you lurkers who emailed me, too).   Your kindness and prayers for my family mean more to me than I know how to express.

Onward and upward.   One of my biggest frustrations in helping people improve their nutrition is that even those of us who eat the healthiest diet sometimes still have mineral absorption problems, despite massively improved health.   That’s possibly thanks to decades of eating the wrong food before we got on the “straight and narrow.”   Helping someone with these specific problems involves getting really detailed and scientific about what is going wrong, and what is missing.   It’s a trial-and-error process.

Lately I’ve been a bit obsessed with studying why some people who eat right have thinning hair.   The next two blogs about iodine and sulfur, are meant to help one reader of this web site and blog, with whom I’ve become  friends.   She is a former Baywatch actress and Hollywood starlet in California, on a quest to find out why her gorgeous hair is dropping to the ground despite being 75-95% raw for some time now.

I’m not going gray, and I wouldn’t say I have thin hair, but it’s much thinner than it was before I had kids, and I am making myself an experiment as well, to see if I can change this.   I have found NO answers to the thinning and graying hair issue within mainstream medicine, and I’ve found no scientific studies on the issue, which is bizarre given the pervasiveness of the problems.   I wish I had the resources to undertake a truly scientific study on what might address this issue within nutrition, because many people are frustrated by hair issues.

So check out the next two blogs if these are issues for you.   I am synthesizing information on iodine and sulfur, but you can decide for yourself if one or both are worth a try for you.   I also think that addressing ALKALINITY has a strong probability of making a big difference.   That’s in Ch. 12, coming up in a couple of months for those of you who subscribe to 12 Steps to Whole Foods.

13 thoughts on “why is everyone’s hair thinning? . . . part 1 of 3

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  1. I’m sure this would relate to fingernails too, so I’ll pay attention. I’ve always had terrible fingernails – they are very weak, they split every which way, they are ridged and bumpy, etc. I was so excited to start GSG because everything says that fingernails will get stronger. Mine have definitely gotten weaker and more splitty. I haven’t intentionally cut anything out of my diet, but by concentrating more on vegetables, I have inadvertently cut out a lot of butter, cream, milk, eggs, and red meat. I haven’t been very good about eating the right kinds of oils (particularly flax seed) because it is so darn expensive! So maybe the loss of the fats is causing a problem for me?

    It’s so unfair — I look around at people who appear to make no efforts at nutrition, and they have the most beautiful, strong fingernails. Although I’m sure they have other unseen health issues.

  2. Robin,

    Thanks so much for addressing this issue! After the birth of my first son 9 years ago, my hair dramatically thinned at my temples. Although it got better, it’s still thinner than before having children. I’ve always hoped that switching to whole foods (which I am just now in the transition of doing) would help. So I am very interested in this topic.

    One question – how long have you been using the Himalayan salt in the form of Sole, and have you noticed a difference in your hair since doing it.

    Thanks so much for all the research you do for us!

  3. The best way to support weak adrenals, of course, is to get OFF SUGAR. And eat a whole-foods, plant-based diet. Weak adrenals are behind many of our issues, according to most natural healers. And guess what–the VAST majority of us have weak adrenals. And what burns them out? Processed sugars/meat/dairy, of course. Vicious cycle!

    Unfortunately I haven’t done a long-enough, dedicated-enough experiment with OHCS to answer that definitively, whether my hair gets thicker. I recommitted to DAILY use recently and will definitely have more to say on that later.

    Victoria Boutenko claims her whole family, even on a raw-food diet, saw their nails get stronger (and her husband’s grey hair come in dark again) when they began drinking green smoothies. Just in case you weren’t confused enough, Katie. You can get flax oil less expensively by using whole flax seed. And don’t forget your coconut oil, a more “functional” oil in its uses and less expensive in my group buys or through that link I provide in the store or coconut oil pages on gsg.com.

    Yes, that’s what I told my friend in Hollywood: I see obese people in terrible health with thick, glossy hair. (Not most, though–most have THIN hair.) I see longtime raw foodists with thin, breaky hair. Then, too, I have raw foodist friends who have the thickest, shiniest hair you’ve ever seen!

    Clearly individual issues are at play here, and addressing them is both art and science–or at least the trial and error I spoke of above. Best to do ONE new thing at a time, for a few months, to see if it helps your hair/nail issues, making your experimentation more scientific. What most people do is a whole lotta things at once, then nothing. Similar to that age-old “health kick” that we go on and fall off the wagon, right?

    Robyn

  4. “Victoria Boutenko claims her whole family, even on a raw-food diet, saw their nails get stronger (and her husband’s grey hair come in dark again) when they began drinking green smoothies.”

    She is exactly who I was thinking of — The Boutenkos, you, the Happy Foody, The Sunny Raw Kitchen, etc.!

    Despite my interest in science and the scientific method, I am extremely bad at making health or body-related observations and doing them in a scientific manner. I do exactly what you said – try a bunch of things, then nothing. And I’m extremely unobservant and unaware of these issues in myself. Examples of conversations I’ve had (slightly exaggerated for effect):

    them: So, did you feel different when you were eating vegan?

    Me: ?

    them: So, when you started the green smoothies, did it make any difference?

    Me: ?

    them: So, what did you eat for breakfast this morning?

    Me: ?

    them: How are you feeling right now?

    Me: ?

    Over the weekend, my husband and I were asked how often our child was doing a certain behavior. My answer — twice per week. His answer — 5-6 times in the last 6 months! So one of is is incredibly unobservant, or our kid acts different around us (completely possible).

  5. “Victoria Boutenko claims her whole family, even on a raw-food diet, saw their nails get stronger (and her husband’s grey hair come in dark again) when they began drinking green smoothies.”

    She is exactly who I was thinking of — The Boutenkos, you, the Happy Foody, The Sunny Raw Kitchen, etc.!

    Despite my interest in science and the scientific method, I am extremely bad at making health or body-related observations and doing them in a scientific manner. I do exactly what you said – try a bunch of things, then nothing. And I’m extremely unobservant and unaware of these issues in myself. Examples of conversations I’ve had (slightly exaggerated for effect):

    them: So, did you feel different when you were eating vegan?

    Me: ?

    them: So, when you started the green smoothies, did it make any difference?

    Me: ?

    them: So, what did you eat for breakfast this morning?

    Me: ?

    them: How are you feeling right now?

    Me: ?

    Over the weekend, my husband and I were asked how often our child was doing a certain behavior. My answer — twice per week. His answer — 5-6 times in the last 6 months! So one of is is incredibly unobservant, or our kid acts different around us (completely possible).

  6. Katie, you’re so much more verbose in your writing than in your answers when people ask you questions! 😉

    Regarding your other question today (on a different post), the hormone clinics’ tests are as comprehensive as anything I’ve seen that is pretty mainstream. I don’t know of a way to test for all mineral deficiencies to ascertain how much you need of each one. Another amazing testing protocol that is WAAAAAY outside the mainstream is live blood analysis. I know someone who does that locally; they, however, sell InnerLight (MLM company all about the alkaline diet). Great test, very detailed, but you have to suspend some disbelief to participate in it.

    If I did the sulfur, I would be doing it for a short period of time to see if it made a difference in the areas I’d identified as being related to my potential mineral deficiencies. It’s not something I’d plan on doing for life, by any means. Once a deep deficiency or imbalance is corrected, it stands to reason that use of OHCS, and a diet rich in greens, would be enough.

    Robyn

  7. Also, Katie. Not everyone can feel a difference eating whole plant foods. But I’m a little worried that you couldn’t answer what you ate for breakfast.

    😉

  8. Do you mean I’m more verbose in writing than in person, or that I’m more verbose (in writing) when I’m initiating the topic (i.e., talking about myself) than I am (in writing) when I’m answering someone else’s question?

    The not remembering breakfast was slightly exaggerated 😉 hee hee

  9. Wait! Were you making a joke about my ‘?’ answers? If so, I get it now. 🙂

    Although I’m pretty much like that in real life. Half the time my brain shuts off when I have to talk to actual people 😛

  10. Robyn, I just heard from a friend whose daughter just came back from a mission from a third world country. While she was there she didn’t eat any meat because she was afraid it would be dog. By the time she came back home her hair was very thin and translucent.

    I remembered this discussion about this healthy life style and why some have thinning hair. Protein is extremely important. I wonder if some vegans aren’t as diligent in making sure they get there daily percentage of protein in? In order to prevent a difficientcy a women needs 46 grams. Meat eaters have no problem getting their daily need for protein in but for non-meat eaters I think it’s something they need be more cognitive of and diligent at.

    Your thoughts?

  11. 1 lb. of raw spinach has @ 12 grams of protein.

    Another thought: Aren’t there only certain vegetables, etc. that have ALL the amino acids? Perhaps some aren’t making sure they get all of the essential amino acids?

    Can you list some of the foods that do contain all of them? Or a simple way we can make sure we get all of our protein AND all the essential amino acids.

  12. Amino acids are in a free floating pool for 24 hours, so you don’t have to worry about eating them all at once. Your body can assemble those raw materials in building proteins even if it was a couple of meals ago that you ate, for instance, lysine. I’m just back from 4+ days out of town and am buried, so I’ll have to look up a better list than this for you later, but the foods I remember that have ALL the amino acids your body cannot manufacture are raw sweet potatoes, and cucumbers!

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