“biological concentration”

I read a post by a 12 Stepper on the other blog on this site, expressing her frustration about the expense of non-organic food and even wondering if it’s worth it to eat a plant-based diet, with all the pesticides on vegetables and fruits.

Dr. McDougall says in The McDougall Program for Women (1999) that animals trap environmental pesticides and other chemicals in their flesh, organs, and milk.   Consequently, animal products are MUCH more concentrated with chemicals than the plant food sources they consume.  

He cites a study that women who eat animal products have 70 percent higher DDT concentrations (DDT being a particularly deadly pesticide known to cause birth defects in humans) in their breast milk compared to vegetarian women.

Young moms, I hope this is encouragement to you, to buy conventional produce if organic is cost-prohibitive to you, wash it well, and rest assured that what you’re doing for yourself and your children is  good and right, because the alternatives are unacceptable.

5 thoughts on ““biological concentration”

Leave a Comment
  1. Thank you for posting this! I have been so discouraged lately because of rising food costs and a large family and it is all I can do to put fresh produce on the table and many times I just can’t afford organic. During some of my ramblings through raw food sites, I have begun feeling so guilty and frustrated because I am doing my family a disservice by not buying organic.

    This gives me the freedom to continue providing what I can.

    Thank you.

  2. Thanks for this encouragement. My family has ten people in it and, though my husband has a great job and provides well for us, organic is usually priced over what I can afford. I already had decided that we’d eat our greens and veggies, even if they can’t be organic, but to hear it from you is reassuring.

  3. Getting organic where I live is hard, and what they do have is expensive. I have 8 people in my house. So I don’t buy organic, only sometimes. I figure that’s better than white flour, sugar and meat. My baby boy (he’s 2 in August) eats salad and loves it, my husband is on a 75% raw diet, going vegetarian (tonight he said no more red meat and pork, YEAH!) I want to share this with you, My husband comes from a severely obese family, mom and sister had gastric bypass, everyone is obese. He’s been obese as a child, he is 37 and for the first time in his life, he is breaking the habit, eatting good. I don’t want my children to grow up like him, I want to give them a start on life, and if non- organic is the way to teach them, it’s better than nothing! Can I just say again how cool it is that my husband is FINALLY changing his life!

  4. I totally get what you are saying here & do buy organic when financially feasible…. but I do have a question when it comes to raw fermented veggies. Everything I read says you have to use organic. In your opinion, do you think it is still ok to use what I can? I’m trying to pick through to find out what is someone else’s agenda & what is actually a health risk — thinking maybe non-oganics & fermenting may not work well together??? or again — maybe they are just of the belief that it is all or nothing organic. Thanks a bunch — I so value your knowledge 🙂

  5. I do still think you use what you can. I understand why so many take a hardline, black-and-white opinion that you absolutely must use organic produce. It’s because they’ve studied the issue and loathe the idea of eating pesticides. I sometimes find myself feeling the same way, but I don’t think those authors realize that the effect they may have is just sending people away from produce and back to eating meat and processed foods (which are higher, not lower, in chemicals, and without the properties to REMOVE toxins from our bodies like vegs and fruits have). I of course want to encourage you to get as resourceful as you can to find affordable organics, like in a CSA (or your own backyard) wherever possible. 🙂 And then otherwise use the conventional stuff, WASHED WELL.

Leave a Reply